World of Coins

Modern Asian coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens => Indian subcontinent: Mughal, Princely states and colonial (1526-1947) => Mughal central government => Topic started by: abhinumis on April 22, 2018, 01:33:42 AM

Title: Muhammad shah dam, Aurangnagar mint
Post by: abhinumis on April 22, 2018, 01:33:42 AM
Hi all,
Here is quite a rare coin in chocolate condition. The mint name is Aurangnagar which is completely on flan.. Aurangnagar is the name of Mulher situated on the border of Maharashtra and Gujrat near Nashik.. Mulher was besieged by Aurangzeb during his first term as the viceroy of Deccan and on 15 January 1638 (28 Sh'aban 1047) the Mughals stormed the lower fort where the Raja and his family resided. A month later, on 15 February, the Raja of Baglana Pratap Shah sent his mother along with the keys to eight other forts to Aurangzeb to beg for truce. The truce was accepted and the Raja was "consoled with a commander-ship of 3000 and an estate at Sultanpur, north of Tapi river". On 4th June 1638 (21 Muharram 1048) he vacated Mulher and his kingdom was annexed."
The only date known is 1139AH which is off flan..
Obverse- Falus badshah Muhammad shah
Reverse - Julus xx, zarb Aurangnagar
Do comment
Title: Re: Muhammad shah dam, Aurangnagar mint
Post by: asm on April 22, 2018, 03:23:22 AM
The only date known is 1139AH which is off flan..
Obverse- Falus badshah Muhammad shah
I think I see some thing other than a 9 in the blue circle. A 2? Perhaps.

Amit
Title: Re: Muhammad shah dam, Aurangnagar mint
Post by: abhinumis on April 22, 2018, 04:30:09 AM
That is '3' of 1139.. The 9 is seen on the curvature of 'dal' on the 2 other specimen that I know of and is completely off flan here
Title: Re: Muhammad shah dam, Aurangnagar mint
Post by: Figleaf on April 22, 2018, 11:59:59 AM
Wondering why this coin is hard to find. No copper mint in Mulher before the siege started? Insufficient copper available (hard to believe)? Sufficient copper in the form of earlier coins and coins from elsewhere available in the fortress before the siege started?

The Raja's gesture of sending his mother is striking. If the mission was dangerous, why send his mother? If it wasn't, why not do it himself? If he didn't know if it was dangerous, why not have preliminary talks by underlings to get more information? Maybe his mother was a brave, diplomatically gifted person who could see her son wouldn't hold out against the Mughals and negotiated an early retirement for him. Whatever the case, she has my sympathy.

Peter