World of Coins

Design and designing => Thematic collecting => Architecture and Landmarks => Topic started by: <k> on July 02, 2017, 10:50:40 AM

Title: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 02, 2017, 10:50:40 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13636.0;attach=62493;image)

Jersey, 50 pence.  The Gatehouse at Grosnez Castle.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13636.0;attach=62494;image)

The castle was built around 1330 and was probably demolished around the time of the French occupation of Jersey (1461–1468). The gatehouse is now the only substantial remnant of the castle.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13636.0;attach=62497;image)

A closer look at the gatehouse.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 02, 2017, 10:52:07 AM
Syria, 10 pounds, 1996, featuring the ruins of Palmyra.

Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 02, 2017, 10:53:16 AM
In 2003 an updated version of the coin was issued. The new version includes a latent image. It is also now beaded.



From Wikipedia:

Palmyra was an ancient Arabic city in central Syria. In antiquity, it was an important city located in an oasis 215 km (134 mi) northeast of Damascus and 180 km (110 mi) southwest of the Euphrates at Deir ez-Zor. It had long been a vital caravan stop for travellers crossing the Syrian desert and was known as the Bride of the Desert. The earliest documented reference to the city by its Semitic name Tadmor, Tadmur or Tudmur (which means "the town that repels" in Amorite and "the indomitable town" in Aramaic) is recorded in Babylonian tablets found in Mari.

Though the ancient site fell into disuse after the 16th century, it is still known as Tadmor in Arabic. There is a newer town of the same name next to the ruins. The Palmyrenes constructed a series of large-scale monuments containing funerary art such as limestone slabs with human busts representing the deceased.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 02, 2017, 11:31:32 AM
The Colosseum in Rome is on anyone list of stuff to see when in Rome.

Depending on your definition of ruined, the Castel del Monte (which is not the place where canned fruit originated) on the Italian 1 eurocent coin may also qualify: it looks pretty good outside, but the inside is stripped bare. Think of Bodiam castle in England for an equivalent.

Peter
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 02, 2017, 11:41:02 AM
Yes, by "ruined" I mean partially ruined. If they were totally ruined, they would not be recognisible.  ;)
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 03, 2017, 08:47:22 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13600.0;attach=62316;image)

This Isle of Man penny, from the year 2000, depicts St Michael's Chapel.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13600.0;attach=62317;image)

St Michael's Chapel is a Celtic-Norse twelfth century chapel built on the site of an earlier Celtic Keeill. The remains of the chapel are located on the south of St Michael's Isle.



According to Wikipedia:

Keeill is a Manx Gaelic word for a chapel. Archaeologically, it is used for a specific type of small simple chapel found on the Isle of Man and built during the early medieval period.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 03, 2017, 08:48:42 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13600.0;attach=62307;image)

The Manx 10 pence of the year 2000 features St. German's Cathedral.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13600.0;attach=62308;image)

St. German's Cathedral: the ruins of the original 13th century cathedral on St Patrick's Isle.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on July 06, 2017, 04:03:08 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34851.0;attach=60782;image)

Macau: the single wall remaining of St. Paul's Cathedral after the fire of 1835, a symbol of the city-state.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=15897.0;attach=33444;image)

Macau, 200 escudos, 1996.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34851.0;attach=60806;image)

Sierra Leone, $1, 1999.  The Portuguese returned Macau to China.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34851.0;attach=60809;image)

Macau, 20 patacas, 2013.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=27363.0;attach=44640;image)

Macao, 5 patacas, 1992.

The water and junk are separate design elements, since the cathedral is not situated by the water.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34851.0;attach=60807;image)

This 100 patacas coin of 1978 celebrates Macau's Grand Prix motor races.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 06, 2017, 11:44:57 AM
A huge collection of ruined buildings on this piece: Machu Picchu. Nobody who has ben there will forget the sight from the vantage point everybody goes to. This is one of a long series, many of which feature ruins. I don't think they circulated.

Pete
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on October 18, 2017, 12:53:19 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=29798.0;attach=72148;image)

Zimbabwe, $1, 1980.  The Zimbabwe ruins.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on November 14, 2017, 10:40:48 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40843.0;attach=77977;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40843.0;attach=77979;image)



The Slovakian 50 halierov was issued in aluminium in 1993, but in 1996 it changed to copper-plated steel. It depicted the picturesque ruins of Devín Castle.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40843.0;attach=77978;image)
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: Figleaf on November 15, 2017, 04:15:07 PM
the Castel del Monte (which is not the place where canned fruit originated) on the Italian 1 eurocent coin may also qualify: it looks pretty good outside, but the inside is stripped bare. Think of Bodiam castle in England for an equivalent.
Title: Re: Ruined buildings on coins
Post by: <k> on September 23, 2019, 01:31:47 PM
Libya, 100 dirhams, 2014.  Kasr Kabaw, an old fortress.