World of Coins

Modern Asian coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens => China, Taiwan => Topic started by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:22:48 PM

Title: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:22:48 PM
From Wikipedia:

Macau ("Bay gate"), also spelled Macao, officially known as the Macao Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is (like Hong Kong) a special administrative region on the southern coast of the People's Republic of China. Macau lies on the western side of the Pearl River Delta across from Hong Kong, which is about 64 kilometers to the east, and it is also bordered by Guangdong of Mainland China to the north and the South China Sea to the east and south. With an estimated population of around 636,200 living in an area of 30.3 km2 (11.6 sq miles), it is the most densely populated region in the world.

Below: Map of China, showing Macao and Hong Kong in the south-east.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:27:22 PM
Around 95% of the population of Macao speaks some form of Chinese as its first language. To compare it with Hong Kong, we see that Hong Kong has an area of 1104 sq km  and around 7.2 million inhabitants, so Macao is far smaller in terms of population (636,000) and area (30.3 sq km).

Below is a map of Macao and Hong Kong.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:30:15 PM
From Wikipedia:

Macau was administered by the Portuguese Empire and its inheritor states from the mid-16th century until late 1999, when it was the last remaining European colony in Asia under Portugal. Portuguese traders first settled in Macau in the 1550s. In 1557, Macau was rented to Portugal from Ming China as a trading port. The Portuguese Empire administered the city under Chinese authority and sovereignty until 1887, when Macau became a colony. Sovereignty over Macau was transferred to China on 20 December 1999. The Joint Declaration on the Question of Macau and Macau Basic Law stipulate that Macau operate with a high degree of autonomy until at least 2049, fifty years after the transfer.

Under the policy of "one country, two systems", the State Council of the People's Republic of China is responsible for military defense and foreign affairs while Macau maintains its own legal system, the public security force, monetary system, customs policy, and immigration policy. Macau participates in many international organizations and events that do not require members to possess national sovereignty.

Macau is one of the world's richest cities, and as of 2013 its GDP per capita by purchasing power parity is higher than that of any country in the world, according to the World Bank. It became the world's largest gambling centre in 2006, with the economy heavily dependent on gambling and tourism, as well as manufacturing.

Below: Map of Macao.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:34:44 PM
From Wikipedia:

The Macao pataca, Macau pataca, or Macanese pataca (Portuguese: Pataca de Macau; Chinese: 澳門圓; ISO 4217 code: MOP) is the currency of Macau. It is subdivided into 100 avos (仙; sin), with 10 avos called ho (毫) in Cantonese. The abbreviation MOP$ is commonly used.

Macau has a currency board system under which the legal tender, Macau pataca (or Macao pataca), is 100 percent backed by foreign exchange reserves, in this case currently the Hong Kong dollar. Moreover, the currency board, Monetary Authority of Macau (AMCM), has a statutory obligation to issue and redeem pataca on demand against the Hong Kong dollar at a fixed exchange rate and without limit.

 
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:35:57 PM
From Wikipedia:

The pataca was introduced in Portuguese Macau and Portuguese Timor in the year 1894, but only as a unit of account. The unit initially corresponded to the Mexican dollar, and it replaced the Portuguese real at a rate of 1 pataca = 450 reais. The name pataca derives from the fact that the Portuguese always referred to the Mexican dollar as the pataca mexicana.

At the end of the nineteenth century, there was no single currency in use in Macau, but the predominant circulating coins were the silver Mexican dollars, the British silver trade dollars of Hong Kong and the Straits Settlements, as well as the silver dollars and fractional coinage of the neighbouring province of Canton. In 1901, it was decided to have a uniquely Macau currency, and for that purpose, the Banco Nacional Ultramarino was granted exclusive rights to issue legal tender banknotes that were to be denominated in patacas.

On January 27, 1906, pataca notes in denominations of 1, 5, 50 and 100 were introduced and all foreign coinage was outlawed, the idea being to make the pataca paper notes the sole legal tender currency in Macau. However, the Chinese, being so accustomed to using silver for barter, were suspicious of this new paper money, and as such, the paper pataca always circulated at a discount in relation to the silver dollar coins. On the contrary, a similar action at exactly the same time in the Straits Settlements, and for the same purpose, had the different effect of putting the new Straits dollar into the gold exchange standard. Hence both the Macau pataca and the Straits dollar were launched at a sterling value of 2 shillings and 4 pence, but where the Straits dollar remained at that value until the 1960s, the Macau pataca fluctuated with the value of silver, just like the Hong Kong unit.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:37:03 PM
From Wikipedia:

In 1935, when Hong Kong and China abandoned the silver standard, the Hong Kong unit was pegged to sterling at a rate of 1 shilling and 3 pence, while the Macau pataca was pegged to the Portuguese escudo at a rate of 5.5 escudos. This meant that the Macau pataca was worth only 1 shilling sterling and was therefore at a discount of 3 pence sterling in relation to the Hong Kong unit.

The first exclusively Macau coinage was not introduced until the year 1952, which happened to be the year after the last pataca fractional coins were minted for East Timor. In that year in Macau, denominations below 10 patacas were replaced by coins.

Coins were not issued for use in Macau until 1952, with the 20 cent coin of Canton Province circulating. In 1952, bronze 5 and 10 avos, cupro-nickel 50 avos and .720 fineness silver 1 and 5 patacas were introduced.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:42:27 PM
Below you see the denominational side of the 5 avos coin that was introduced in 1952. The legend refers to the colonial power, Portugal.

From numista.com:

Metal   Bronze
Weight   2 g
Diameter   16.9 mm
Thickness   1.23 mm
Shape   Round
Orientation Coin alignment ↑↓
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:44:24 PM
Below you see the denominational side of the 10 avos coin that was introduced in 1952.

From numista.com:

Metal   Bronze
Weight   4.02 g
Diameter   20.3 mm
Thickness   1.53 mm
Shape   Round
Orientation  Coin alignment ↑↓
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 05:47:05 PM
Below is the obverse design of the 10 avos, which was common to the whole coinage. It specifies Macau and shows the then coat of arms of Macao, which included a Chinese dragon.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 06:02:25 PM
There was no 20 or 25 avos coin, but a 50 avos coin was issued. In contrast to the 5 and 10 avos, the side carrying the legend "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" now also carried the Portuguese coat of arms, and the denomination was moved to the side that specified "MACAU" in the legend.

From numista.com:

Metal   Copper-nickel
Weight   3.6 g
Diameter   20 mm
Shape   Round
Orientation  Coin alignment ↑↓
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 06:07:27 PM
Here is a closer look at the Macao coat of arms on the 50 avos.

See also: Dragons on coins (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,15897.0.html).



It is interesting to look at the other coats of arms within the Portuguese Empire of the 20th century. They follow a theme, each being similar, but with the upper right of the shield showing local symbols. See: Portuguese Empire: Coats of Arms of the 20th Century (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,16079.0.html).
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 06:14:13 PM
The 1 pataca coin of 1952 followed the pattern of the 50 avos, with the standard side showing "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA", whilst the MACAU legend side carried the denomination.

From numista.com:

Metal   Silver (.720)
Weight   3 g
Diameter   19 mm
Shape   Round
Orientation  Coin alignment ↑↓
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 06:17:52 PM
Finally, the 5 patacas coin of 1952 followed the format of the 1 pataca coin.

From numista.com:

Metal   Silver (.720)
Weight   15 g
Diameter   31 mm
Shape   Round
Orientation  Coin alignment ↑↓
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 06:22:51 PM
In 1967 the 5 avos and 10 avos coins were issued in nickel-brass, and with a slightly different weight and size.

5   avos: weight - 2.6 g; diameter - 17 mm.

10 avos: weight - 3.9 g; diameter - 22 mm.


The designs remained unchanged.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 06:27:27 PM
Meanwhile, from 1968 to 1975 the 1 pataca coin was issued in nickel instead of silver. Its weight was now 10.6 g and its diameter 28.5 mm, so it was larger and heavier. Its design remained the same, so I am not posting an image of this coin.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 08:06:50 PM
In 1974 Macao issued its first commemorative coin, a silver 20 patacas coin, 35mm in diameter and weighing 18 grams. It commemorated the opening of the Macao-Taipa Bridge. The reverse design shows a Chinese junk sailing under the bridge.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 08:08:57 PM
From Wikipedia:

The Governor Nobre de Carvalho Bridge also known as the Macau-Taipa Bridge, is a dual-lane two-way bridge connecting Macau Peninsula near Casino Lisboa and the island of Taipa at the northern slope of Taipa Pequena (Small Taipa Hill) crossing the Baía da Praia Grande. It is the first bridge in Macau, to connect the peninsula and Taipa. It is locally known as "The Old Bridge" (Chinese: 舊大橋).

Construction started in June 1970, during Portuguese rule. With a length of 2,569.8 metres (8,431 ft) and a width of 9.2 metres (30 ft), it was opened to traffic in October 1974. The middle of the bridge is raised, in the shape of a triangular arc, to allow vessels to pass through. The highest point of the bridge is 35 metres (115 ft) above sea level. Once the longest continuous bridge on Earth, it is named after José Manuel de Sousa e Faria Nobre de Carvalho, the Governor of Macau from November 25, 1966, to November 19, 1974. Due to the construction around Casino Lisboa, the bridge was temporarily closed in 2005. As of 2006, the bridge is open again, but only to buses and taxis.

The bridge is meant to take the shape of a dragon, with Casino Lisboa representing the dragon's head, and Taipa Monument on Taipa Pequena the dragon's tail.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 08:50:42 PM
Meanwhile, history was on the march in the colonial power of Portugal. From 1933 until 1968, Portugal had been governed by António de Oliveira Salazar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ant%C3%B3nio_de_Oliveira_Salazar), a right-wing authoritarian dictator. He was against socialism, communism and liberalism and was an old-fashioned traditionalist, in favour of Catholicism. Though his regime adopted something of a fascist look in the 1930s (using fascist salutes and fascistic uniforms), he was in fact against fascism. He despised Hitler, neo-paganism, the cult of youth, and the idea that "might is right". He also strongly disapproved of racism and anti-semitism.

Salazar was, however, a convinced imperialist. He believed that Portugal had a "civilising mission" around the world, and especially in its colonies in Africa, which he regarded as an integral part of Portugal. After the Second World War, unlike the other Western powers, he clung to his empire and refused to offer independence to his colonies. Eventually this caused wars of resistance in Angola, Mozambique and Portuguese Guinea, which put increasing strain on the Portuguese economy and military. It also alienated Portugal from her Western neighbours, who saw Salazar as an outdated and increasingly brutal dictator. After suffering a stroke in 1968, Salazar was replaced by Marcelo Caetano (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcelo_Caetano), who followed similar policies. Eventually, in 1974, the Portuguese military rebelled and overthrew the regime in a remarkably peaceful coup, known as the Carnation Revolution (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnation_Revolution). After two turbulent years, Portugal established a democratic government on April 25 1976.

From Wikipedia:

Shortly after Portugal's 1974 Carnation Revolution, which overthrew the Estado Novo dictatorship, the new government determined it would relinquish all its overseas possessions. In 1976, Lisbon redefined Macau as a "Chinese territory under Portuguese administration" and granted it a large measure of administrative, financial, and economic autonomy. Three years later, Portugal and China agreed to regard Macau as "a Chinese territory under (temporary) Portuguese administration".
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 08:57:07 PM
In 1978, Macao issued a new 50 avos coin, for that year only. Its design more closely matched the format of the 5 and 10 avos coins that had been first issued in 1952. The denomination was moved to the other side of the coin, and the Portuguese arms were replaced by Chinese characters showing the denomination.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:11:03 PM
In 1982 Macao issued a new design series. The lowest denomination was now 10 avos. The last 5 avos coin had been issued in 1967. There was now a 20 avos coin for the first time, but the highest denomination was still 5 patacas. The legends of "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" and "MACAU" were now brought together on the obverse, which showed a less elaborate version of the Portuguese arms.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:12:15 PM
The common obverse design of the new 1982 set.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:14:06 PM
The new 10 avos coin was brass, weighed 3.3 g and measured 19.1 mm in diameter. The reverse gave the denomination in Portuguese and in Chinese characters.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:17:02 PM
The new 20 avos coin was brass, weighed 4.7 g and measured 21.1 mm in diameter. The reverse gave the denomination in Portuguese and in Chinese characters.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:25:10 PM
The new 50 avos coin was brass, weighed 5.75 g and measured 23 mm in diameter. The reverse gave the denomination in Portuguese and in Chinese characters.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:29:59 PM
The new 1 pataca coin was copper-nickel, weighed 9.2 g and measured 26 mm in diameter. The reverse showed two carps associated with the goddess Mazu and symbolising harmony.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:34:58 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=15897.0;attach=89101;image)

The new 5 patacas coin was copper-nickel, weighed 10.7 g and measured 27.5 mm in diameter.

The reverse showed a dragon as a symbol of good luck.

 
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:37:23 PM
From Wikipedia:

The Chinese and Portuguese governments commenced negotiations on the question of Macau in June 1986. The two signed a Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration the next year, making Macau a special administrative region (SAR) of China.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:50:03 PM
In 1993 Macao released another new design series. The new obverse included a stylised bat as a symbol of good luck.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 09:56:48 PM
The 10 avos of 1993 features a traditional lion dance.

The new coin was brass, weighed 1.38 g and measured 17 mm in diameter.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:01:47 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=15897.0;attach=50426;image)

Macao, 20 avos, 1993.  Dragon boat.

The new coin was brass, weighed 2.8 g and measured 20 mm in diameter. Unlike the previous coin, it was 12-sided (dodecagonal).
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:07:56 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=15897.0;attach=60779;image)

The 50 avos of 1993 featured a traditional dragon dance.

The new coin was aluminium-brass, weighed 4.59 g and measured 23 mm in diameter.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:12:01 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9128.0;attach=89211;image)

Macao, 1 pataca, 1992.  The Guia Lighthouse.

The new coin was copper-nickel, weighed 8.9 g and measured 25.98 mm in diameter.  It was introduced in 1992, a year earlier than the lower denominations.

 
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:16:17 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=27363.0;attach=44640;image)

Macao, 5 patacas, 1992.

The single wall remaining of St. Paul's cathedral after the fire of 1835, a symbol of the city-state. The water and junk are a separate design element, as the cathedral was not on the water.

The new coin was copper-nickel, weighed 10.1 g and measured 27.5 mm in diameter. In shape it was dodecagonal (12-sided).  It was introduced in 1992, a year earlier than the lower denominations.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:22:50 PM
The Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:30:22 PM
The reverses of the 1993 set.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:34:54 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13600.0;attach=60784;image)

In 1997 Macao issued a bimetallic 10 patacas coin.  It featured St Dominic's Church, Macao.



From numista.com:

Metal   Bi-Metallic Copper-nickel center in Brass ring
Weight   12 g
Diameter   28 mm
Thickness   2.7 mm
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:35:26 PM
St Dominic's Church, Macao.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:43:19 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13600.0;attach=60708;image)

Macao issued its first 2 patacas coin in 1998. 

The coin was octagonal and made of nickel-brass. Weight: 9.5 g; diameter: 27.5 mm.

The reverse design featured Penha Church and Ama Temple.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 16, 2016, 10:47:35 PM
A Ma Temple and Penha Church, Macao.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 05:49:01 PM
From Wikipedia:

The Chinese government assumed formal sovereignty over Macau on 20 December 1999. The economy since then has continued to prosper with the sustained growth of tourism from mainland China and the construction of new casinos.

The Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration and Macau Basic Law, Macau's constitution, promulgated by China's National People's Congress in 1993, specified that Macau's social and economic system, lifestyle, rights, and freedoms would remain unchanged for at least 50 years after the transfer of sovereignty to China in 1999. Under the principle of "one country, two systems", Macau enjoys a high degree of autonomy in all areas except defence and foreign affairs. Macau officials, rather than PRC officials, run Macau through the exercise of separate executive, legislative, and judicial powers, as well as the right to final adjudication. Macau maintains its own currency (the Macanese pataca), customs territory, immigration and border controls and police force.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 05:55:39 PM
A new design series was issued in 1999, to celebrate Macao's return to China from Portugal.

10 avos.       Sun Yat Sen memorial park.
20 avos.       Convent of the Precious Blood, location of Macao’s Monetary Authority.
50 avos.       The Bridge of Friendship, between Macao and Taipa.
1   pataca.    Cultural Centre.
2   patacas.  Formula 3 racing car in front of the ruins of St Paul’s Church.
5   patacas.  Greyhound racing, with the Lisbon Hotel in the background.
10 patacas.  Government Palace.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:01:17 PM
The common obverse of the new set showed the municipal flag of Macao.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:04:27 PM
From: CRW Flags (http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/mo-mau.html)

Macao City municipal flag

The flag commonly used in the territory was the local flag of the capital: Cidade de Santo Nome de Deus de Macau. This flag is blue with the municipal shield in the center.

Jaume Ollé 07 April 1997

Strictly speaking this was the flag of the /Leal Senado/ (Loyal Senate), the municipal council of the City of Macau (that is, the peninsula portion of Macau) from 1583 to 1999.

The flag displayed a version of the coat-of-arms of the Kingdom of Portugal: it commemorated the Senate as the only place in the world to continue to fly the Portuguese flag, when the Portuguese Empire was under Spanish control (Iberian Union) from 1580 to 1640. For this feat of loyalty, the City of Macau was granted the title "Cidade do Santo Nome de Deus de Macau, Năo Há Outra Mais Leal" (City of the Holy Name of God of Macau, There is None More Loyal) by King John IV in 1654; a slightly shortened version of this title appeared at the bottom of the flag. The Senate itself was likewise granted the title "Loyal" by Prince-Regent John (later King John VI) in 1810.

Although the flag was technically only that of the /Leal Senado/ of the City of Macau, it was sometimes used as the flag to represent the whole colony of Macau, notably during international sporting events (such as the Asian Games). Nonetheless during Macau's handover ceremony to China in 1999, the announcers made it clear that it was the flag of the /Leal Senado de Macau/ that was to be lowered along with that of Portugal.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:10:08 PM
Portugal also issued a silver 500 escudos coin to commemorate the handover. It featured the famous Taipa bridge.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:17:57 PM
China also issued various coins in 1999 to commemorate the event.

Below: China, 10 yuan, 1999.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:20:43 PM
China, 50 yuan, 1999.  Gold.

Images courtesy of colnect (http://colnect.com/).
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:24:27 PM
The common obverse of the Chinese commeorative coins featured the new regional flag of Macau.

From Wikipedia:

The Regional flag of the Macau Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China (Chinese: 中華人民共和國澳門特別行政區區旗; Portuguese: Bandeira regional da Região Administrativa Especial de Macau da República Popular da China), is light green with a lotus flower above the stylised Governor Nobre de Carvalho Bridge and water in white, beneath an arc of five gold, five-pointed stars: one large in the centre of the arc and four smaller ones.

The lotus was chosen as the floral emblem of Macau. The Governor Nobre de Carvalho Bridge is a bridge linking the Macau Peninsula and the island of Taipa. The bridge is one of the most recognisable landmarks for the territory. The water beneath the lotus and the bridge symbolise Macau's position as a port and its role played in the territory. The five five-pointed stars echo the design of the flag of the People's Republic of China, symbolising the relationship Macau has with its sovereign state.

According to the Basic Law of Macau, the Macau Regional Flag is a green flag with five stars, lotus flower, bridge and sea water.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:26:57 PM
Even Sierra Leone got in on the act, issuing a commemorative dollar coin in 1999 to celebrate the handover.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:29:30 PM
Macao has issued some interesting commemorative pieces over the years. This 100 patacas coin of 1978 celebrates Macao's Grand Prix motor races.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:35:47 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=27363.0;attach=58909;image)

Macao, 100 patacas, 1988.

More fine designs, showing a junk and a racing car.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:36:39 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34821.0;attach=60713;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34821.0;attach=60714;image)

Macao, 100 patacas, 1995.  Opening of Macao's International Airport.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:39:47 PM
Macao, 20 patacas, 2013.  Year of the snake.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 17, 2016, 06:40:57 PM
See also: Hong Kong: Elizabeth II and the Return to China (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9872.0.html).
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: <k> on March 18, 2016, 11:41:35 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=15897.0;attach=33444;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=27363.0;attach=33502;image)

An interesting collector coin from Portugal: 200 escudos, 1996.  Discovery of Macao.
Title: Re: The modern coinage of Macao
Post by: quaziright on March 18, 2016, 09:12:30 PM
I had visited Macau while in China last year. Sad to say it was quite underwhelming and those monuments such as the Guia lighthouse and Saint paul's ruins look much better in the pictures than in real life (they are definitely not imposing in any sense of the word). Even the lago do senada (I'm not sure i spelt that right), was such a tiny street. In a few words, you don't visit Macau to see portuguese heritage. Worth going and seeing the Casinos though. Wouldn't recommend staying overnight in Macau though