World of Coins

Design and designing => Thematic collecting => Architecture and Landmarks => Topic started by: <k> on March 26, 2011, 02:12:57 AM

Title: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on March 26, 2011, 02:12:57 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=26522.0;attach=72675;image)

Here are two designs of oil derricks. If they look similar, that's because they were both designed by Geoffrey Colley (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9492.0.html): a Nigerian 1 kobo and a 50 fils coin of the United Arab Emirates.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on March 26, 2011, 10:08:23 PM
Brazil, 20 centavos, 1978.
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on March 26, 2011, 10:31:01 PM
Colombia, 5 pesos, 1980.
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: Figleaf on March 27, 2011, 02:52:59 PM
Romania, 3 lei.  Cracker with drillers left. Train below. Wall to stop capitalist spies. Sociallist arrt.

Peter
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on March 30, 2011, 12:33:09 PM
Mozambique, 10 meticais, 1980.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: Figleaf on March 30, 2011, 12:58:19 PM
Another oil refinery.

It is no coincidence that you find many of these industrial complexes on coins of (semi-)communist regimes. The communist model of economic development puts much weight on heavy industry. The model didn't work, of course. Making energy and steel are not ends by themselves, but a means towards an an end: private consumption. This is lost on communist theoreticians, because they measure production, not wealth, let alone welfare.

There are AFAIK no factories on Chinese coins. There is a reason. When China became communist, it had an agriculture-based economy. Mao was quite unable to start a significant heavy industry. His solution was to encourage mini smelters for small-scale production. They proved to be highly inefficient and quite polluting, but if you measure production only, advantages of scale mean nothing. Only capacity counts.

I visited the German-built Baoshan steel plant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baosteel) in the early eighties, when it was gleaming new. It is a continuous casting plant, meaning that the heat of the smelting process is re-used. Starting up the plant is costly, but once it is started up, it is quite efficient. The plant was started up for the occasion of our visit. It ran for a few minutes, spectacularly producing an amount of metal and was shut down again. We were told unofficially, that when the plant ran, there was no electricity left for the area around it, including Baoshan district. The railroad wasn't finished and the port was even less finished, making it difficult to get ore into the plant and taking steel out. Such was the waste of large plants.

The story ends well; the plant now runs well, port and railroad are finished and heavily used. The Chinese government has discovered that its survival depends on private consumption, not production. That also means that it is unlikely we'll see a circulation coin with Baoshan on it.

Peter
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on April 07, 2011, 01:49:08 AM
Romania is very strong on this sort of theme.  5 lei, 1978.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=3277.0;attach=12655;image)
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: chrisild on April 07, 2011, 10:44:12 AM
Was. Actually the one you show us here is dated 1978, and that was the last one with such an "industrial infrastructure" design. After that, no new designs for regular circulation coins until 1990. Fortunately there is Transnistria to the rescue, even though it's only a collector coin. See Romanian coins (http://romaniancoins.org/ro10rt08_uzina_ribnita.html).

Christian
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on April 22, 2011, 01:38:25 PM
I believe there is an oil derrick to the left of the trees in this coat of arms. It appears on the obverse of the Romanian 5 bani coin of 1956.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on April 22, 2011, 11:59:24 PM
Poland, 2 zloty, 2003.  150th anniversary of the oil and gas industry.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on May 07, 2011, 07:59:44 PM
Canada, 25 cents, 2005.  Oil derrick, Alberta. Essential for allowing your cows and flowers to thrive, as you can see.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on May 19, 2011, 12:56:11 AM
Algeria, 5 dinars, 1972.  An oil drilling tower.
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on August 04, 2011, 03:47:37 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=89010;image)

Azerbaijan, 2007, 50 qapik.  More oil derricks.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: Figleaf on August 04, 2011, 04:24:49 PM
All these oil-related coins remind me of the half-explained, but very real fact that natural resources (whether oil, diamond, poppy or something else) tend to work negatively on development, especially when the population is relatively small. I think they create a lop-sided economy, with a sector awash in cash, the rest short of cash. Naturally, cash becomes cheap for those who profit from it, so it works out as corruption and government by maffia. The worst example may be Nigeria, a failed state floating on oil money. Crime has become normal, honesty is punishable, if need be by death. Refusing prostitution may get you hurt. Accepting an order may be the end of your company if you can't afford non-payment.

Developed countries are not immune, though. In the 1980's, there was much talk of the Dutch disease: spending income from non-renewable resources on entitlements. This is why Norway started its oil fund (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Government_Pension_Fund_of_Norway). I think the fund is basically a way to prevent the NOK from rising, making all other sectors of the Norwegian economy uncompetitive. Can you imagine what would happen if North Sea oil income would suddenly stop now that Britain is trying to build down its national debt? Natural resources look like a windfall, to be celebrated on a coin, but some countries may just have been better off without it.

Peter
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 06:10:44 PM
France, 10 francs, 1979.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: izotz on December 05, 2011, 04:28:19 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=11238.0;attach=73980;image)

Spain 50 pesetas 1957 (*64). 25 years of peace.

This was only a rare pattern. It never got into circulation. There are many fakes.  The Spanish Civil War lasted from 1936 to 1939. The issue date would be 1964, the date on the star. So, in case it had been issued, it would be 25 years of peace ("paz") since the end of the Civil War.
 
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on December 07, 2011, 01:45:55 PM
Iran, 50 rials, 1985.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on July 02, 2012, 12:05:19 PM
Argentina, 2 pesos, 2007.  Discovery of oil.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: Bimat on November 01, 2012, 02:54:20 PM
UAE, 1 Dirham, 2012 commemorative: 50th Anniversary of First Shipment of Oil.

Aditya
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: Miner on August 06, 2013, 06:08:57 PM
Mexico. Tamaulipas. Oil rig and capacity on the arms
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on September 17, 2013, 12:17:06 AM
Romanian, 1 leu, 1949.  Oil drilling tower.
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on September 17, 2013, 12:18:10 AM
United Arab Emirate, 50 fils, 1998.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on September 17, 2013, 02:42:53 PM
Iraq, 250 fils, 1973.  Oil nationalisation.
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on September 17, 2013, 02:43:22 PM
Iraq, 500 fils, 1973.  Oil nationalisation.
 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: SquareEarth on September 17, 2013, 04:50:03 PM
I visited the German-built Baoshan steel plant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baosteel) in the early eighties, when it was gleaming new. It is a continuous casting plant, meaning that the heat of the smelting process is re-used. Starting up the plant is costly, but once it is started up, it is quite efficient. The plant was started up for the occasion of our visit. It ran for a few minutes, spectacularly producing an amount of metal and was shut down again. We were told unofficially, that when the plant ran, there was no electricity left for the area around it, including Baoshan district. The railroad wasn't finished and the port was even less finished, making it difficult to get ore into the plant and taking steel out. Such was the waste of large plants.

The story ends well; the plant now runs well, port and railroad are finished and heavily used. The Chinese government has discovered that its survival depends on private consumption, not production. That also means that it is unlikely we'll see a circulation coin with Baoshan on it.

Peter

Baosteel was a part of broader economic scheme in 1978, nicknamed "foreign leap forward", which referred to the plan's hastiness and its reliance on imported machines. The name was definitely an overstatement as although large sum of hard currency was spent, it did not cause widespread devastation.

Furthermore, "Foreign Leap Forward" had a predecessor, the "Scheme 43": Mao's $4300000000 plan to import chemical fiber, petrochemical, fertilizer, steel, and electricity equipment from the west.

Park Sung Sang, Head of Bank of Korea under President Park Chung Hee, wrote that the initial stage of economic development require the government to build up infrastructure for steel, fertilizer, cement and electricity, because they are necessary to facilitate of economic development, and they are so universally needed that their mere supply generates its own demand. 

It would be hard to imagine China's economy without these infrastructure built in the 1970s (purchased from the west). Even in the 1990s, fertilizers, steel and electricity was in shortage everywhere.

(http://web.archive.org/web/20151110183248/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/23/wyol.png)
Here is a medal for the first produces of Baosteel.

Regards

Chuan.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: SquareEarth on September 17, 2013, 05:35:31 PM
I find it hard to comprehend why anyone can be proud of their oil because
1) God made it there, not human intelligence;
2) Oil can be more of a curse than a blessing.  It proliferates corruption, and invites foreigners to invade your country.

This country seems an exception:  Norway, Centenary of Independence
 (http://web.archive.org/web/20151110183212/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/30/ofy3.jpg)

Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on September 17, 2013, 06:55:15 PM
Romania, 20 lei, 1951.  An oil cracker with gas being flamed off. Left are two generic chimneys.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: Figleaf on September 17, 2013, 07:18:01 PM
Park Sung Sang, Head of Bank of Korea under President Park Chung Hee, wrote that the initial stage of economic development require the government to build up infrastructure for steel, fertilizer, cement and electricity, because they are necessary to facilitate of economic development, and they are so universally needed that their mere supply generates its own demand.

I would imagine that a survivor of the Park era would think that way. It is, however, dead wrong. Think of how Taiwan developed and you'll see what I mean. Development can be from the bottom up or from the top down or both. There is no standard recipe. India is developing a competitive service sector without having had an competitive industrial sector that it was based on.

I find it hard to comprehend why anyone can be proud of their oil

To poor countries, oil means economic and financial independence, a balanced government budget, financial space to develop a community, jobs. To rich countries, oil is geopolitically significant and an important cost item. Too often, oil turns out to mean corruption and an underpinning for mafia boss-like dictators, out to inflate their bank accounts.

Natural gas (quite similar to oil economically) caused the "Dutch disease", making the government feel richer than it is. Norway has avoided the trap by feeding its oil royalties into an "oil fund" (Government Pension Fund), a sovereign wealth funds (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereign_wealth_fund). While the solution is appropriate for developed countries, it often seems an instrument to keep current rulers in power in developing countries.

Peter
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on April 01, 2014, 01:49:00 PM
UAE, 1 dirham, 2007.  30th anniversary of Zakum Development Company.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on May 27, 2015, 12:04:50 PM
Egypt, 1 gunayh, 1988.  25th Anniversary of the Ministry of Industry.
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on March 20, 2016, 12:44:34 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=34879.0;attach=72624;image)

Kuwait, 2 dinars coin, 1976.  15th anniversary of independence.

The reverse design depicts the gate of the old wall of Kuwait City; a dhow - a traditional sailing boat used throughout the region; and an oil derrick, the main source of wealth for the country.

 
Title: Re: Oil rigs and refineries
Post by: <k> on January 16, 2018, 11:20:53 PM
Egypt, 5 pounds, 1986.