World of Coins

Design and designing => Thematic collecting => Architecture and Landmarks => Topic started by: Galapagos on October 28, 2008, 08:16:19 PM

Title: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Galapagos on October 28, 2008, 08:16:19 PM
Its description is: China Republic / East Hopei 1937 1 Chiao

and I just received it in the post today. I've only seen one other Chinese architecture coin that I like so much. Must hunt it down again - it's from a similar period, and also a puppet state coin, I believe, but this time in aluminium.
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: africancoins on October 28, 2008, 10:13:59 PM
How about this one ?

Thanks Mr Paul Baker
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 28, 2008, 10:31:59 PM
That's the temple of heaven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Heaven) in Beijing. The other three in the series are the temple of earth, the temple of he sun and the temple of the moon. A bit like cards in a tarot game ...

When I get my scanner back I'll post another Chinese building o a coin here.

Peter

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/TempleofHeaven-HallofPrayer.jpg/800px-TempleofHeaven-HallofPrayer.jpg)
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: africancoins on October 28, 2008, 11:18:03 PM
Here's another...

The reverse of a Republic period 20 Cents from Fukien Province.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 29, 2008, 01:30:02 AM
This picture comes from this site (http://www.drben.net/ChinaReport/Beijing/Landmarks-Hotspots/Fengtai/Tianning_Si-Tianning_Temple/TianNingTemple1.html), so next time in Beijing, you can find it ;D

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 29, 2008, 01:43:20 AM
Here's another...

The reverse of a Republic period 20 Cents from Fukien Province.

This is the Huang Hwa massacre memorial on Y388 and Y389. I found a pic on the net, showing that the design on the coin is pretty sloppy.

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 29, 2008, 03:27:08 PM
When I get my scanner back I'll post another Chinese building on a coin here.

The printer (which is also the scanner) will be out for at least another week. Here's the coin from km, as fixed up by me. I have been unable to find out which building is on the coin: Yunnan KM493, 20 cents year 38.

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: translateltd on October 29, 2008, 08:30:32 PM
I know nothing of the Chinese year system, Figgers. When was year 38 - and 1 or 0 ?

Dates start from the establishment of the Republic with 1912 as year 1, so add 1911 to Republican dates to get your actual AD.  The system is still used in Taiwan.
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 29, 2008, 09:34:28 PM
Oh no - that gives me 1949  - a combumist coin!

Not quite. The PRC wasn't established until October 1949. The last of the "official fighting" took place in 1950 and resistance in Yunnan continued until 1953.

South Korea is not China, of course, but the architecture is related. Since the end of the Korean war, the 10 won coins show Da Bo Tap pagoda, here on KM 33.1.

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 29, 2008, 09:37:40 PM
I had the pleasure of visiting the Bulguksa religious complex. I wasn't prepared for standing face to face with the building I knew so well from the coins, an Alice-in-Wunderland experience of walking inside a well-known picture.

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 30, 2008, 10:23:24 AM
Who can resist such encouragements? Let's cross over to Japan for another interesting building-on-a-coin. This may be the commonest coin in the world after the Lincoln cent, but like the Lincoln cent, it is too often taken for granted. Ladies and gentlemen (drum roll) I present you Japan Y 73a, 10 yen year 35 (1960) with the Phoenix hall of the Byodo temple in Uji (near Kyoto)

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 30, 2008, 10:33:02 AM
Kyoto was slated for total destruction in 1945, one of the targets of atomic bombing. The city owes its survival to the resistance of Henry Stimson, secretary of war, to that decision. Today, the city and its surrounding districts are a UNESCO world heritage site. Look here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historic_Monuments_of_Ancient_Kyoto_(Kyoto,_Uji_and_Otsu_Cities)) to see why.

The Phoenix Hall is in a pleasant, park-like setting. You approach it from its back, so you only slowly come to grips with the fact that the building can never be pictured on a coin, or even a picture in all its glory. It is so light and open to te eye, that it seems like a transparent, ghost-like phoenix, spreading its wings, ready to fly away.

Peter

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/Byodo-in_Uji01pbs2640.jpg/800px-Byodo-in_Uji01pbs2640.jpg)
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on October 30, 2008, 10:40:00 AM
I can't resist adding that, in spite of the throngs of tourists, the highlight of the area is the Kiyomizu complex (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiyomizu-dera) (please follow the link and look at all the pictures and realize that it's better in 3D). Not just for its breathtaking view and dazzling architecture, but especially for being a place that is sacred to three different religions, who just get along. Bethlehem, take note. It can be done.

Peter
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: translateltd on October 30, 2008, 06:36:21 PM
Gorgeous photos and interesting history - my only quibble would be that your coin would appear to be dated S.54 (1979) rather than 1960 :-)

Title: East Asian architecture on coins.
Post by: BC Numismatics on October 30, 2008, 09:06:47 PM
I'm not sure if the Shwe Dagon Pagoda appears on any coins from Burma,but I do know that is does appear on some of the banknotes from Burma,including the current notes issued by the 'Central Bank of Myanmar',along with the Chinze.

Aidan.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on October 30, 2008, 09:47:44 PM
We are moving South now and why not? This will open the thread up to the rich heritage of Thailand. Meanwhile, here's what Aidan was talking about in banknote form and a slightly different angle in reality, with a close-up added to do the pagoda justice.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Galapagos on November 01, 2008, 03:42:34 PM
Here is the Indonesian traditional Menangkabau house, as portrayed on the 1978 100 rupiah coin.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: ghipszky on August 03, 2009, 04:48:43 AM
Such beautiful buildings!!! I love bank notes because of the beauty and the colors. I love the architecture in that part of the world. This thread is very interesting.
Ginger
And how to count what yr the coin was minted could be learned.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 07, 2009, 03:57:31 PM
Thailand also has some great buildings on its coins, but I don't have a source for which buildings they are.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: translateltd on August 07, 2009, 08:32:53 PM
Thailand also has some great buildings on its coins, but I don't have a source for which buildings they are.

Peter

I haven't looked yet, but what about Schön?  His descriptions are usually pretty thorough.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 12:17:21 AM
No descriptions in my stone age edition. Malaysia (Parliament building) and Singapore (apartment block and airport control tower) didn't really fit the bill.

Here's one my daughter passed during a boat tour in Bangkok. The object of this coin is the royal barge, Suphannahong. However, to its left in the background rises the silhouette of the imposing Wat Aran.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 12:48:34 AM
Found another one. KM183, 1 baht 2538 BE (1995 AD), showing part of the Royal palace complex in Bangkok.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 01:17:11 AM
Back to Japan. This is Y85, 100 yen 1975 for Expo'75 in Okinawa. It features Shurei-no-mon, the gate to the Shuri-jo (Shuri castle). To see a tourist's impression of the castle (the gate comes into view after 2 minutes), go here (http://www.okinawa-information.com/content/shuri-castle-naha)

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 01:45:01 AM
A coin with two buildings. The big building is the Potala palace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potala_Palace) in Lhasa, Tibet. Unfortunately, this is a Chinese coin: Y96, 1 yuan 1985.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 02:32:38 AM
An interesting counterpoint to the previous one is this one. Taiwan, 10 yuan 54 (1965) commemorating Dr. Sun Yat Sen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Yat-sen). The obverse has his portrait, the reverse his mausoleum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Yat-sen_Mausoleum) in Nanking, which is in mainland China. The design is somewhat childish and the angle pretty impossible, but the designer had undoubtedly never been there. The two buildings on the coin don't figure together on any picture on the net, so they are presented separately. The building in the foreground is the gatehouse. The main building is in the background.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: ghipszky on August 08, 2009, 02:36:31 AM
Wow those coins are amazing Peter. Most Roman coins with architecture on them are costly. How much would the average coin that you have shown in the most recent posts costs if you found one to buy? Where do you buy these types of coins??
Ginger
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 02:54:46 AM
The coins range from extremely common (the two Thais, the Korean) to pretty hard to find, but still relatively cheap (the Taiwanese coin). Apart from the Taiwanese, you should be able to find a couple of these coins in rummage trays and the rest should be available from serious dealers in non-US coins.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 03:14:16 AM
The last one I found (also on a cheap coin) is from Mongolia, KM 124, 100 tugrik 1994 with the temple of Boddhisattva Avalokiteshvara at Gandantegchinlen Monastery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gandantegchinlen_Monastery). The dimension seem slightly incorrect. The character on the other side is the soyombo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soyombo_symbol), very well explained in Wikipedia.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Prosit on August 08, 2009, 03:25:15 AM
This is an EXCELLENT thread with a lot of wonderful images of coins and places.
Way to go!  Keep em coming.

Dale
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Bimat on August 08, 2009, 07:38:43 AM
What an amazing thread! Interesting places and coins :) I wish I could visit Thailand and see those places.(Where are you Richie? You must have seen few of those in your Thailand trip? ;) )
India issued a 1 Rupee commemorative showing our Parliament on reverse as well.
After seeing this thread,I can definitely say that this can be a good thematic collection :)

Aditya
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 08, 2009, 12:15:32 PM
I agree that this is coin collecting at its best; the coins as portals to more knowledge and beter understanding. It is difficult to come up with more, but I did find yet another one. Through several types, Thailand has put the Phra Pathom Chedi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Pathom_Chedi) on the reverse of its 5 satang coins. In spite of their very low denomination, these coins are somewhat difficult to find, since they no longer circulate in Thailand and dealers won't carry them because of their low catalogue quote. Since I don't have a copy, I borrowed one, date 2550 BE (2008 AD) from Wikipedia.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on November 08, 2009, 06:59:22 PM
Here's a coin my daughter picked up for me in Japan. It is one of a series of 47(!) pieces for each of the prefectures. This one is for Nagano prefecture. It shows Zenkoji temple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zenkoji) (no idea why the ox was added). Zenkoji is not attached to any particular Buddhist sect, making it a popular and relaxed attraction for pilgrims of all stripes.

The temple played a role in the Olympic movement. It rang its bell for the opening ceremonies for the 1998 Nagano Games as well as for the 1964 Tokyo Summer Olympics. However, in 2008 it did not want to be involved in the transfer of he Olympic flame as a protest against the Chinese mass killing of Tibetan Buddhist monks.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 08, 2010, 11:05:25 PM
A banknote (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,5402.0.html) triggered this one: Pashupatinath temple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pashupatinath_Temple) in Kathmandu. Not my coin, unfortunately.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: ghipszky on January 09, 2010, 11:28:40 PM
Really beautiful.
Ginger
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 10, 2010, 12:52:06 AM
Thank you, Ginger. This is one of my favourite threads. Nepal is another treasure trove of coins with Asian buildings. Here is the stupa of Swayambhunath (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swayambhunath) on a common Nepalese coin.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: RHM22 on January 10, 2010, 01:08:36 AM
This is an extremely interesting thread along with some extremely interesting coins. Your collection is very extensive, Peter. Very nice!

By the way, the last Thai coin posted appears to dated 2551 BE rather than 2550.
Title: Re: Beautiful Pagoda Design on China Puppet State Coin of 1937
Post by: Figleaf on May 16, 2010, 04:09:15 PM
I have been unable to find out which building is on the coin: Yunnan KM493, 20 cents year 38.

However, it looks like this building, the birthplace and residence (now a museum) of Chen Yun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Yun), in Qing Pu, now part of Shanghai. The house is pictured on Y1208. Except of course that neither the date, nor the issuing province make sense.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 12, 2010, 12:22:20 AM
Here is a spectacular pattern coin from Indonesia with Prambanan temple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prambanan), a UNESCO world heritage site. The coin shows one tower for more detail, but the site boasts more towers.

Peter



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9830.0;attach=73932;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9830.0;attach=73933;image)
 
 
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: andyg on July 12, 2010, 12:33:12 AM
Here is a similar building so far not mentioned, If you'd like to do the honours Peter...?
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 12, 2010, 12:51:04 AM
This is of course the central part of the famous Cambodian temple of Angkor Wat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angkor_wat), rising out of the jungle. The picture was taken from a different angle. The temple was much plundered during the "Vietnamese war", but it is now a major tourist attraction again. Don't miss the spectacular model of the site at the bottom of the wiki page.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: <k> on July 17, 2010, 12:50:17 AM
Vietnam, 2003.

1] 1000 dong. Bat De Pagoda in Hanoi.

2] 2000 dong. Highland Stilt House in Tay Nguyen.

3] 5000 dong. Chua Mot Cot Pagoda in Hanoi.

Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 17, 2010, 01:20:57 AM
Thanks E. M. U.

I haven't found a decent pic of this building in the Ly Bat De (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lý_Bát_Đế_Shrine) complex. It is in the background on the first picture.

The second picture is a communal house of the Bah Nar people (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahnar_people).

The third picture shows One Pillar Pagoda (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chùa_Một_Cột), one of the better known landmarks of Hanoi. I am a bit unhappy to see that the stately staircase is not on the coin.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: <k> on July 17, 2010, 12:47:04 PM
The second picture is a communal house of the Bah Nar people (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahnar_people).

Peter

Is there a purpose behind the disproportionately large roof?
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 17, 2010, 01:10:20 PM
I don't know, but my guess is that it was a combination of reasons. One was probably that they didn't have the technology to build multi-storied constructions, while roofs are easier because part of the weight of roof and (diminishing sized) floors is borne by the two sides of the roof, rather than the supporting walls. My guess is that the main purpose of the upper floors was storage of food. If so, heating at the bottom would have helped dry and preserve stored goods and the shape of the building would have guided the heat up to the right places, controlled by vents at the top of the roof. Compare the Oast houses (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oast_house) in Kent.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 19, 2010, 11:31:06 PM
Amazingly, Namdaemun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Namdaemun) (Main South Gate) never made it to a real coin, so here it is on a pseudo coin.

The city gate is one of the few old buildings left standing after the Korean war, becoming an instant symbol of South Korea. It burnt in 2008 and has since been completely restored. Its name was also used for a huge nearby open air market. Both the gate and the market attract many visitors and rightly so.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Prosit on August 19, 2010, 11:37:12 PM
I have always found open air markets very enjoyable.
Dale

...Its name was also used for a huge nearby open air market...Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 19, 2010, 11:46:45 PM
Try searching pictures in Google (http://www.google.com/images?hl=nl&rlz=&q=namdaemun%20market&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&biw=1040&bih=791) with namdaemun market. It takes hours to cover this one and you get lost continuously.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: <k> on March 12, 2011, 05:03:51 PM
Sri Lanka independence commemorative, 50 rupees, 1998.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on March 12, 2011, 07:35:14 PM
This is of course the temple of the tooth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_the_Tooth) of Buddha (Dalada Maligawa) in Kandy with the Pattirippuwa (Octagon) in the forefront. We are no longer in East Asia, but who cares? There are many more graceful buildings to explore in Asia.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: <k> on March 12, 2011, 08:44:30 PM
Back into East Asia now. From Thailand.

Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on March 12, 2011, 09:00:19 PM
The ordination hall (Ubosot) of Wat Benchamabophit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Benchamabophit) in Bangkok. As Wikipedia puts it: "Also known as the marble temple, it is one of Bangkok's most beautiful temples and a major tourist attraction."

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: goossen on June 22, 2011, 09:54:03 PM
Great post. Here is my collaboration:

Mongolia 200 Tugrik, with the Government Palace.

(http://www.paraguaycoins.com/fotos/1488.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: <k> on August 03, 2011, 04:44:45 PM
Cambodia, 1853, one tical.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 03, 2011, 09:07:34 PM
The Brtish Museum claims it is Angkor Wat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angkor_Wat). It is difficult to argue with the BM, but look at the picture: the towers are different, the roof is different and what is similar is pretty typical for many Cambodian temples. My problem is that I have nothing better to offer.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Prosit on January 08, 2012, 05:40:55 AM
Thailand 2 Baht

Is that 2010? 
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 10, 2012, 11:39:35 AM
That is Wat Saket (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Saket), the golden mount temple in Bangkok.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: adam on January 11, 2012, 04:54:39 AM
Any help with the date?
Dale
Quote
Thailand 2 Baht

Is that 2010? 

Yes. It is B.E. 2553 = A.D. 2010
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: <k> on November 28, 2012, 07:10:48 PM
Laos, 10,000 kip, 1975.  Wat Xieng Thong (Temple of the Golden City).
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on November 28, 2012, 08:11:13 PM
Wat Xieng Thong (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Xieng_Thong) in Luang Prabang.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:02:27 PM
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205400/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/829/vhlp.jpg)

Gyeonghoeru(Celebration and Reunion Building, Korean Royal Banquet Hall),
a part of Gyeongbokgung (Auspicious and Happy Palace, Korean Palace Complex)
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyeongbokgung (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyeongbokgung)

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ec/Gyeongbokgung-Gyeonghoeru-02.jpg/320px-Gyeongbokgung-Gyeonghoeru-02.jpg)

I fell in love with the place when I saw it on Korean old 10000won note.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/10000_won_serieII_reverse.jpeg)

Regards
Chuan
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:09:15 PM
Apart from the scientific value, I like the stone architecture in Korea. It's more aesthetic and Eco-friendly than brick architectures in China.
Cheomseongdae , or Satr-gazing Tower in Korean (Sino-Korean!) was a Korean Astronomical Observatory built by Queen Seondeok of Silla in the 600s.
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108204636/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img22/7273/k8wu.jpg)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheomseongdae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheomseongdae)
Lame people tried to point out it's for Astrology other than Astronomy, but I miss the days when Astronomy and Astrology was essentially one thing.

Regards

Chuan
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:21:53 PM
Korea, Independence Gate.
Initially as a symbol of independence from China, but later a symbol of the March 1st Independence movement, from Japan.
Here it is used as a reference to Korean independence in 1945.

(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205453/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/585/wo43.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:27:17 PM
Mogao Caves of Dunhuang.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mogao_Caves (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mogao_Caves)
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205215/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/35/m9l8.jpg)
Not quite an architectural Marvel, but known for the paintings inside.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a1/Mogao_Caves.jpg/320px-Mogao_Caves.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:36:02 PM
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205152/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/585/o32b.jpg)
It's a traditional cultural element used in architecture, that's it.
Quote
Huabiao  is a type of ceremonial columns used in traditional Chinese architecture. Huabiaos are traditionally erected in front of palaces and tombs. The prominence of their placement have made them one of the emblems of traditional Chinese culture.

Classical texts in China attribute the beginning of the huabiao to Shun, a legendary leader traditionally dated to the 23rd-22nd century BC...

The Huainanzi describes the feibangmu, literally "commentary board", as a wooden board set up on main roads to allow the people to write criticism of government policies.

In the Han Dynasty, the bangmu became merely a symbol of the government's responsibility to the people. These were erected near bridges, palaces, city gates and tombs; the name huabiao arose during this time.

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huabiao (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huabiao))

Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:38:37 PM
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205126/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/12/j2ff.jpg)

Tsinghua University Centenary
Tsinghua Main Gate

I like the depiction of the gate (iconically) as well as use of the text as frame, but the text itself again fails me. Someone used Microsoft Yahei as the font?
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0e/TsinghuaUniversitypic2.jpg/320px-TsinghuaUniversitypic2.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 02, 2013, 07:49:08 PM
This picture belongs with reply 61. The memorial is not as old as it looks, but it has much emotional value. It is not easy to be situated between China and Japan. Read more here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Gate).

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 07:51:53 PM
South Korea, Seoul's Great South Gate, officially known as the Sungnyemun (Gate of the Exalted Rites).
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205101/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/600/6t61.jpg)

This coin commemorate the restoration of the gate after it's burnt down by an arsonist.
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/73/Sungnyemun_restored.jpg/320px-Sungnyemun_restored.jpg)

Sad, sad people. But it's a beautiful coin.

Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 02, 2013, 08:00:02 PM
Here is the huabiao (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huabiao) on Tienanmen that apparently served as an example. There are amazing similarities between the huabiao and totem poles. This picture goes with reply 63.

Peter
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 08:25:53 PM
Here is the huabiao (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huabiao) on Tienanmen that apparently served as an example. There are amazing similarities between the huabiao and totem poles. This picture goes with reply 65.

Peter
I've actually read a book by a mainland Chinese living in north America whom, after reading too much Jack London, decided to venture north alone, along with his car, and then he stumbled across a set of totem poles, thus beginning his love affair with Pacific Indian culture.

He got himself hired by a Indian fishing-boat owner, and spent long days on the sea carving totem poles.

He later read up about pacific Indians, and wrote a Chinese book about totem poles...

And I think your speculation make sense. Shang and Zhou Dynasty Chinese bronze art was very very similar to pacific Indian art I read in that book(see below) , and both are different from the Mesopotamian , Indus or Egyptian civilization. And aside from the physical similarities, the totem poles were used to document legends of a tribe, and if traditions had been the same in China, later Chinese writers might mistaken it for "criticism against rulers" as these tribal legends may not be all that nice.

Chinese Bronze Pattern
(http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/special/imgs/art8.gif)
Pacific Indian Pattern
(http://behance.vo.llnwd.net/profiles2/206424/projects/610113/f75ce52c7dc4b54d57a3e1a5727357c5.jpg)
It's a very tempting theory.

Chuan
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 08:45:24 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulguksa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulguksa)
The Seokguram Grotto(above) is a hermitage and part of the Bulguksa temple complex (Below).
It was built by King Beopheung of Silla. The name Beopheung means "Reviving the (Buddha) Dharma".
Somehow I felt Korea was a more competitive and creative nation under the three kingdoms than under one unified Goryeo or Joseon state.
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205030/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/96/pn5s.jpg)
Bulguksa is located on the slopes of mount Toham (Jinheon-dong, Gyeongju city, North Gyeongsang province, South Korea). It is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and encompasses seven National treasures of South Korea, including Dabotap and Seokgatap stone pagodas, Cheongun-gyo (Blue Cloud Bridge), and two gilt-bronze statues of Buddha. The temple is classified as Historic and Scenic Site No. 1 by the South Korean government.[1] In 1995, Bulguksa was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List together with the Seokguram Grotto, which lies four kilometers to the east.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3e/Korea-Gyeongju-Bulguksa-32.jpg/320px-Korea-Gyeongju-Bulguksa-32.jpg)Bulguksa

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/Seokguram_Buddha.JPG/352px-Seokguram_Buddha.JPG)Seokguram Grotto

Chuan
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 08:49:32 PM
Joseon Kings' Ancestral Temple
Jongmyo
With Confucian Ceremonies.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jongmyo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jongmyo)
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205004/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/826/qhco.png)
(http://www.d-addicts.com/forumfiles/jongmyo_shrine.kor-kth.avi2_672.jpg)
(http://londonkoreanlinks.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/ej3.jpg)
Regards
Chuan
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 09:03:26 PM
PRC
1Yuan
1981
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108204938/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/707/dce8.jpg)
The Great Wall.
In the 1980s, some sections of the wall was renovated with little knowledge of rules of relic renovation.
The Ming Great Wall therefore suffered.
But it's not that the wall was completely a "made-for-tourist" thing like Saddam's Babylon palaces...

Plus, large portions of the great walls are NOT tourist attractions, and therefore are NOT subjected to such tragic, destructive renovations, they are referred to as "wild" Great Wall (like this Jiankou Great Wall below), and remains original.

(http://www.chinatourguide.com/china_photos/beijing/attractions/beijing_jiankou_pass_great_wall_sky_stair.jpg)

Regards
Chuan. 
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 09:54:43 PM
Macau: Temple of A-Ma
The Portuguese came, asked the locals what is this place, the locals thought they were pointing at the temple, and answered in Cantonese: "ma-gok", House of the Mother, or Ma-tzu's temple. Hence come the name "Macau".
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108204841/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img801/7617/zvqe.jpg)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7e/Templo_de_A-Ma.jpg/350px-Templo_de_A-Ma.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 10:39:59 PM
This is not a real life building.
This is the Guanghan palace, a mythical building on the moon, where Chang'e is said to live.
Coin for Mid-autumn Festival.

(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108204911/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/15/w02d.jpg)

(http://www.admissions.cn/Culture/images/2013/7/2/70334.jpg)

Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 02, 2013, 10:49:35 PM
Another non-existent building is Hanyuan Hall of Daming Palace.
(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110121754/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/42/5s6m.jpg)
An Tang Dynasty palace which the Archeologist could only imagine what it used to be like.
(http://www.crystaledu.com/uploadfile/2009/1114/20091114110311225.jpg)
This is all we have now:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d3/Site_of_Hanyuan_Hall_2011-07.jpg/640px-Site_of_Hanyuan_Hall_2011-07.jpg)

Historians face tremendous difficulty in re-creating what the palace was really like, but it does not stop tourism developers from building theme parks out of it, and tell tourists that they are real...
 >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 12:14:16 AM
(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110121620/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/35/yrjc.jpg)
White Pagoda from the Miao Ying Temple in Beijing, Yuan to Qing Dynasty.
Despite the many atrocities and failings of the Yuan and Qing Dynasty, their pro-Buddhist policies were extremely successful.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ec/Beihai_Park-Qiongdao_Island.jpg/320px-Beihai_Park-Qiongdao_Island.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 12:18:02 AM
Pagoda forest, Shaolin Temple.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagoda_Forest_at_Shaolin_Temple
Starting from the Tang Dynasty
(http://imageshack.us/scaled/landing/706/igl8.jpg)
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Shaolin_Temple_China.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 12:52:25 AM
Macau, Ruin of St Paul's
Macau may be the least bloody colonial power (Luso-tropicalism), and their cultural heritage is worth commemorating.
The Chinese name for the ancient cathedral is Paifang(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paifang), which is a serious cultural misunderstanding. 
(http://www.pandaamerica.com/upd_images/macau-2013-snake-silver-1oz.jpg)
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a0/Ruins_Of_St_Paul%27s_Cathedral%2C_Macau.jpg/489px-Ruins_Of_St_Paul%27s_Cathedral%2C_Macau.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 01:09:38 AM
Sun Yat Sen‘s Residence in Shanghai
(http://www.wantchinatimes.com/newsphoto/2011-10-09/450/xinsrc_0920804160836873129052-122035_copy1.jpg)
Modern Chinese communities have this "religion" for Dr Sun, wherever he stayed, be it in Shanghai, Singapore, Macau, Penang, Guangzhou, or Hong Kong, become temples. He is really some iconic figure other than someone to be treated seriously.
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 01:18:00 AM
Northwest Corner Tower of the Forbidden City (Song Dynasty paintings on the reverse.)
Nothing much to talk about...
(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110121149/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/191/cu1.gif)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/24/Northwest_cornor_of_the_Forbidden_City.jpg/640px-Northwest_cornor_of_the_Forbidden_City.jpg)
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 01:25:34 AM
Zhengyang Gate, or "Front Gate" of Beijing.
Iconic Landmark.
It was once burnt by the Alliance of Eight Nations during Boxer War.
(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110121028/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/818/3yyd.jpg)
PRC, 1984, 150 Yuan.

(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110121103/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/708/jjqz.jpg)

Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 03, 2013, 02:03:44 AM
Daedong (Great Unity) Gate of Pyongyang
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taedongmun
North Korea
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108210051/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/18/g8jf.jpg)

The gate seems to be on every North Korean Coin, like Temple of Heaven on every Chinese Panda coin.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/46/Taedongmun.jpg)
Title: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Bimat on August 03, 2013, 03:44:31 PM
Just one word: WOW!

Aditya
Title: Re: East Asian architecture on coins
Post by: Figleaf on February 16, 2015, 10:40:08 PM
This one is not genuine either, but in another sense.

Okayama castle was burnt in an air attack in 1945. It was reconstructed and is now equipped with an elevator. The small building is a tea pavilion on the water in Kōraku-en park across the river.

Peter



"Okayama Castle, IMG 5839-5841 AutoAdaptive" by Kimon Berlin - originally posted to Flickr as IMG_5839-5841_AutoAdaptive. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Okayama_Castle,_IMG_5839-5841_AutoAdaptive.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Okayama_Castle,_IMG_5839-5841_AutoAdaptive.jpg