World of Coins

Design and designing => Thematic collecting => Wildlife and agriculture => Topic started by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:09:21 PM

Title: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:09:21 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9872.0;attach=13958;image)

Hong Kong dollar, 1997.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:09:59 PM
Hong Kong, Royal Visit, 1975.  Lion and dragon.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:10:54 PM
Macao, 5 patacas, 1988.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:11:34 PM
Macao, 50 avos, 1993.  Dragon dance.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:12:13 PM
Macao, 20 avos.  Dragon boat.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 27, 2012, 02:12:52 PM
UK pound coin: Welsh dragon.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on June 30, 2012, 05:28:01 PM
Notice the dragon in the coat of arms on this 1968 1 pataca coin from Portuguese Macao.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: chrisild on June 30, 2012, 10:36:28 PM
Does a lindworm count too? Here is one from Klagenfurt, on an Austrian collector coin from 2011.

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: chrisild on June 30, 2012, 10:44:31 PM
And a basilisk from Vienna (same series, from 2009) ...

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: chrisild on June 30, 2012, 10:50:14 PM
Here is a French "Year of the Dragon" piece. Images from the Austrian (previous two) and French mints.

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on July 10, 2012, 01:26:41 PM
Vietnam, 50 xu, 1953.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on July 10, 2012, 05:28:38 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9946.0;attach=14202;image)

Iceland, 10 kronur, 1930.  Dragon at top right.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on July 10, 2012, 05:29:19 PM
Iceland, 2 kronur, 1962.  Dragon at top right.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on July 10, 2012, 05:30:07 PM
Iceland, 10 kronur, 1987.  Dragon at top right.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on July 10, 2012, 05:30:56 PM
Iceland, 50 aurar, 1988.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Figleaf on July 10, 2012, 06:30:35 PM
China, 5 cash Kiang-soo. Similar coins for other provinces.

Peter
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: capnbirdseye on July 10, 2012, 09:08:31 PM
here's a classic one of mine from China,  Hsüan-t'ung, 10 cents 1911 Y#28
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Prosit on July 10, 2012, 09:48:19 PM
Indonesia has some Komodo coins....it is a dragon...at least by name.
Dale
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: chrisild on July 10, 2012, 10:44:53 PM
But why would that keep us from posting images? ;D From Wikipedia:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1d/Komodo_coin%2C_Indonesia_Dscn0057.jpg)

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Prosit on July 10, 2012, 10:55:22 PM
Nice looking coin!  Many impressive dragons out there. More than I knew about.
I try not to post images of coins I don't have but like most of my rules I break it
at least 10-20 percent of the time.
Dale


But why would that keep us from posting images? ;D From Wikipedia:

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on October 07, 2012, 04:48:34 PM
Transnistria, 100 roubles, 2012.   Year of the dragon.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on October 23, 2012, 07:36:15 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9918.0;attach=28012;image)

British Virgin Islands , 25 dollars, 1978.  Griffin on the left, dragon on the right.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on November 28, 2012, 07:46:48 PM
UK, 1 pound, honouring Cardiff, the capital of Wales.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Figleaf on November 28, 2012, 09:42:18 PM
Maybe someone should tell the designer of the Transnistrian thingy that the year of the dragon is an Asian thingy and his dragon is a European thingy. Asian dragons are snakes with chicken feet. European dragons are typically lizards.

Peter
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on February 25, 2013, 06:49:48 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=8790.0;attach=32873;image)

A pattern UK decimal half penny of 1963, never issued. It was also designed by Christopher Ironside.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Figleaf on February 25, 2013, 11:20:46 PM
Haven't thought about this before, but there is an interesting dichotomy between St George slaying a dragon and the dragon being Welsh. Maybe Georgie's dragon is green and bad and the Welsh dragon (which is not a classical dragon, more like a winged wolf) is red and good? Or does it just see red of anger? Bob knows...

Peter
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Arminius on February 25, 2013, 11:35:09 PM
(http://www.arminius-numismatics.com/coppermine1414/cpg1414/albums/userpics/10001/Jap20SenY3.jpg)

Japan, Mutsuhito (Meiji era) (1867-1912), dated Meiji year 4 = 1871 AD.,
20 Sen (24 mm / 4,97 g), type 1, .800 silver, mintage type 1+2: 4,313,015 ,
Obv.: Japanese symbols, around dragon in circle clutching pearl of celestial wisdom.
Rev.: Kiku Mon, rising sun in dotted circle, chrysanthemum and pawlonia wreath, pawlonia and chrysanthemum crests above.
KM Y3 ; JNDA: 01-20 .

 :)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on February 26, 2013, 12:36:05 PM
Haven't thought about this before, but there is an interesting dichotomy between St George slaying a dragon and the dragon being Welsh. Maybe Georgie's dragon is green and bad and the Welsh dragon (which is not a classical dragon, more like a winged wolf) is red and good? Or does it just see red of anger? Bob knows...

Peter

Interesting point. It's one of those things that I know (the Welsh dragon is red, others are green) but have never consciously dwelt on. I'll see if I can find out. I once asked a proud Welsh friend why the Welsh had adopted a far Eastern creature. He didn't answer, but just walked off in a huff.  ::)

From the internet:

The red Welsh dragon "Y Ddraig Goch" owes its origins to folklore and Arthurian legend. Originating from a serpent representing the Welsh God Dewi, Celtic King Arthur was said to have had a dream about a red dragon (symbolically representing Wales), which slayed a white dragon (which represented the Saxon invaders). In later times a crude red dragon design was adopted by Prince Llywelyn of Gwynedd in the 7th Century and taken into battle by Welsh hero Prince Owain Glyndwr, in conflicts with the invading English.

In later history, at the Battle of Bosworth, Welsh-born King Henry VII (Henry Tudor, crowned 1485) unfurled the red dragon, which he in turn had adopted as his own emblem. As such, the beloved red dragon has always represented the defiant Welsh nation, iconising Wales's unique cultural and historic heritage as a proud and ancient nation, which has long survived external threat. The Welsh dragon is often associated with the motto, "Y Ddraig Goch a ddyry Gychwyn" - or "The red dragon will show the way".
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 26, 2013, 01:09:45 PM
I once asked a proud Welsh friend why the Welsh had adopted a far Eastern creature.

What is surely interesting is that difference between "here" and "there". In Europe the dragon is usually the "bad guy" that gets killed by a hero/saint, while in Asia it has a positive connotation. Then again, the City of London (the central district so to say) has two dragons on its CoA, neither of which looks particularly dead to me.

From what I have read, the Welsh dragon is older than St. George's dragon, by the way. Used to be that St. Michael was the "dragon slayer", and it was only ;) about 1000 years ago that this role was "transferred" to St. George ...

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Prosit on February 26, 2013, 06:14:22 PM
Most of the coins I have seen with St Georg and Dragon have a pretty pitiful looking Dragon being trampled and speared to death. Doen't appear to be much of a challenge.  The Dragon should be big as a house...now that would take a hero  ;)

Dale




What is surely interesting is that difference between "here" and "there". In Europe the dragon is usually the "bad guy" that gets killed by a hero/saint, while in Asia it has a positive connotation. Then again, the City of London (the central district so to say) has two dragons on its CoA, neither of which looks particularly dead to me.

From what I have read, the Welsh dragon is older than St. George's dragon, by the way. Used to be that St. Michael was the "dragon slayer", and it was only ;) about 1000 years ago that this role was "transferred" to St. George ...

Christian
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: nguyen anh tu on March 09, 2013, 06:36:52 AM
LIBERIA 5 CENTS 2000

Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: nguyen anh tu on March 09, 2013, 06:41:24 AM
JAPAN - MEIJI 1 SEN 1877
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: nguyen anh tu on March 09, 2013, 06:46:05 AM
KOREA 5 FUN 1893 .  ???

Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: nguyen anh tu on March 09, 2013, 06:47:05 AM
AND TWO DRAGONS FROM CHINA
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Figleaf on March 09, 2013, 05:00:46 PM
In China, Japan, Korea and other areas in East Asia, the dragon was a symbol of state and the colour indicated rank. These dragons (snake or fish body, chicken feet) are the equivalent of the European coat of arms. The Liberian coin is simply a reference to the Asian "year of the dragon", an attempt to make commercial profits from a zodiac that is definitely not from the Liberian culture.

Peter
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: nguyen anh tu on March 12, 2013, 07:32:37 AM
 DRAGON HEAD FROM US MILITARY TOKEN

Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on March 15, 2013, 01:00:57 AM
Portugal, 200 escudos, 1996.  Settlement of Macao.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 06:14:54 AM
Vietnamese Year of The Dragon (2000)
(http://art-hanoi.com/collection/vncoins/vn-50k-2000-o.jpg)

Make it two.
(http://art-hanoi.com/collection/vncoins/vn-10k-2000m-o.jpg)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 06:39:00 AM
A dragon cannot be a dragon without all the clouds it rouses.
2000, PRC, 10 Yuan.
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205615/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img202/7576/j5at.jpg)

2012, PRC, 10 Yuan
Though both years are dragon (5th in the 12 year cycle), 2000 was Year Gengchen(17th in a 60 year cycle), 2012 was Year Renchen (29th in a 60 year cycle). These are shown on the coins as well.
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205631/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/855/cj2z.jpg)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 07:22:17 AM
There are so many of Chinese coins (Or .hk, .sg, .kr, .jp, .vn, coins etc.) featuring dragons, that it's becoming a cliche.
And hence I'm not going to post these "made for collectors" stuff any more, if there is no cultural significance attached to it.

And the whole world jumps into this bandwagon, despite little or no connections culturally whatsoever.
Transnistria, 100 roubles, 2012.   Year of the dragon.(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=15897.0;attach=27372;image)
Three things annoys me
1) Their history is not related to dragon AT ALL, and yet they made this so that a Chinese person would be foolish enough to buy it.
2) The dragon has bat-wings...
3) The fake "Chinese" font. ШФЦLD THЭУ БЭ HДPPУ IF CHIИД MДКЭ Д CФIИ, FЭДTЦЯIИG DФЦБLЭ-ЭДGLЭ ШITH ИФ ШIИG, ШITH THЭ FДКЭ CУЯILLIC FФИT?

CHuan
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: paisepagal on August 04, 2013, 07:40:26 AM
Interesting....so that Chinese character is just some rubbish scrawled on ?
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 07:46:53 AM
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205657/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/823/ro4r.jpg)
Singapore can be forgiven for flooding the world with dragon coins, they actually do have dragon dances each Chinese New Year, i.e. it's apart of their culture still.

Baby dragon. With symbols of "Happiness(dragon ball), Fortune(Japanese gold coin???), and Longevity(Peach of Immortality, and "Mountain of the South"). 
It's very creative.
(http://imageshack.us/scaled/landing/405/d6i1.jpg)

A carp becomes a dragon if it jumps across the "Gate of Dragon", so this one counts as well.
(Singaporean coin designers actually know the story behind dragons, unlike the Transylvanian designer in the previous post.)
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205757/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/27/e8ik.jpg)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: paisepagal on August 04, 2013, 07:47:53 AM
Bhutan is the dragon kingdom and there are alot of collector coins that depict them

(http://www.24carat.co.uk/images/1993bhutan300ngultrum40thanniversarycoronationobv400.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 07:50:52 AM
Interesting....so that Chinese character is just some rubbish scrawled on ?
That Chinese character means "dragon" in simplified Chinese, but the font for Cyrillic is a a bizarre fake Chinese font(see below), and the Chinese word is kept consistent to that fake Chinese font.

This is not Chinese!!!!!!
(http://evilbrainjono.net/images/curvy_triangle_font.jpg)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 08:09:10 AM
Speaking of Fonts, the nicest font to be feature on a coin is the "Seal Script", i.e, the script actually used on ancient bronze wares.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seal_script
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205826/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/20/w7lg.jpg)
The 4 Chinese characters here are "Felicitous Dragons Offer Auspice"

The coin was struck in 1988, Year Wuchen(5th in a 60 year cycle, see post #50).
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 08:21:19 AM
It'd be nice to have an Indonesian Naga on a coin.
A Indian Naga still has that snake shape, but Indonesian Naga look just like dragon.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7e/Traditional_indonesian_instruments04.jpg/320px-Traditional_indonesian_instruments04.jpg)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 10:09:03 AM
Ancient Dragon Decorative
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205853/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/208/b1ma.jpg)


I did not find the exact artifact of this dragon pattern, but the style looks like Warring States Period.
(http://www.cultural-china.com/chinaWH/images/exbig_images/fcbcae6232f7c845130d6aa344722def.jpg)

Regards
Chuan
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 04, 2013, 03:05:23 PM
The wings are OK for a European dragon. There is a tendency to mix up European and Asian dragons. See replies #26 and 29 of this thread. The font is a "mood" font, supposed to remind you of brush writing. This is just a clumsy attempt to squeeze money out of the Chinese-zodiac-medals-market. Comes free of artificial colouring and thought. Saccharine added.

Maybe by Indonesian dragon you mean the Komodo? See reply #24 of this thread.

Peter
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 07, 2013, 12:42:01 AM
Qing Xuantong(1909-1911), Copper Coin of the Great Qing, 1 cent.
Google Key "大清铜币“
(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205920/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/819/y93m.jpg)
This is one of my favorite coin featuring a dragon, I like how they left empty spaces on this side.

The fact that the coin was named after the empire (Qing) other than the provinces showed efforts made by the court to standardize currency, a part of the New Policies, Qing's last attempt to save itself after the boxer war. http://www.funfront.net/hist/china/lqreform.htm (http://www.funfront.net/hist/china/lqreform.htm)

This reform had long lasting impacts, but was little-discussed.

(http://web.archive.org/web/20151108205950/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/46/0u8z.jpg)
Another thing I like is the unit: the coin is now 1 mil, 5 mils, 1 cent, and 2 cents, other than the traditional "cash" designation. It even bore words saying (ten for one dime silver [on one cent coin]), which showed the Qing's attempt to fix the floating price between silver and copper coins.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on August 10, 2013, 03:27:21 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=42548.0;attach=84215;image)

Georgia, 2 lari, 2006.  George and the dragon appears on the shield of the Georgian coat of arms.

 
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on August 17, 2013, 04:05:26 PM
Belarus, 20 rubles, 2009.  The story of Little Rolling Pea. (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/sfs/sfs31.htm)
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on November 29, 2013, 03:55:54 PM
From the Royal Mint:

Hong Kong One Cent

When the coinage of Hong Kong was being introduced in the 1860s several trial pieces were prepared for the range of planned denominations.   The one cent piece illustrated here was one such trial, combining a crowned portrait of Queen Victoria on the obverse with several symbolic devices on the reverse, including a miniature St George and the dragon.

The reverse also includes the letters RM, for Royal Mint, and TG, the initials of the then Master of the Mint Thomas Graham. It may well have been in Thomas Graham's mind that an earlier Master, William Wellesley Pole, had gone to great pains to ensure that his initials appeared on the new half-crowns, shillings and sixpences introduced in February 1817.   As it transpired, Thomas Graham was not to have his moment of glory on the Hong Kong coinage, his initials being omitted from the designs finally approved.

Image copyright of Royal Mint.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on March 07, 2018, 03:08:14 PM
Isle of Man, 5 pounds, 1998.  50th birthday of Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on April 30, 2018, 11:18:39 PM
See also: Saint George and the dragon (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,42548.0.html).
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on December 30, 2019, 01:36:13 AM
British Indian Ocean Territory, 4 pounds, 2019.  Saint George and the dragon.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: Henk on December 30, 2019, 10:20:21 AM
Saint Georgina perhaps?
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: eurocoin on December 30, 2019, 10:33:00 AM
It is not Saint George but rather some random warrior.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on December 30, 2019, 12:57:14 PM
Saint Georgina perhaps?

You're probably right. I didn't notice the breasts at first, but anyway some men are very obese and have moobs these days - but probably not in those days.
Title: Re: Dragons on coins
Post by: <k> on December 30, 2019, 12:59:35 PM
It is not Saint George but rather some random warrior.

Apparently you're right:

Warrior and Dragon - 2019 2oz Proof Fine Silver High Relief Coin (https://www.pobjoy.com/products/view/warrior-and-dragon-2019-2oz-proof-fine-silver-high-relief-coin)

How does one join the Random Warrior Regiment?

Well, the design is very warlike. Perhaps it means, "United Nations, Mauritius - you CAN'T have us! But if you want us - watch out!"