World of Coins

Research and reference => Numismatics => Topic started by: Alan Glasser on May 29, 2012, 01:48:24 AM

Title: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Alan Glasser on May 29, 2012, 01:48:24 AM
Hello, everyone.

I just found a piece I am looking for at MA_shops.com. I am looking for a proof example and find so many different grading terms and abbreviations in German. Is "PROBE" the accepted term in German for "PROOF" or are there others? Is there a list of German grading terms and abbreviations somewhere?

Thanks very much.

Alan  MA
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: akona20 on May 29, 2012, 01:54:12 AM
Polierte Platte (PP) means proof from memoery and Stempelglanz (STGL) is the grade below. But it is sometime since I have looked at high quality coins from a german supplier.
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Figleaf on May 29, 2012, 02:13:50 AM
"Probe" (test) should be pattern. Some sellers find the terms confusing, but MA shops should use them correctly.

There is a table of grades in several languages in the SCWC.

Peter
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Alan Glasser on May 29, 2012, 02:16:56 AM
Thank you.

That is exactly what I needed to know!!!!

Alan  MA
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Alan Glasser on May 29, 2012, 02:34:22 AM
Now that I think about it, I have several Chopin Pieces from Poland marked "Probe".  Does the Polish mint (or DID the Polish mint) consider proof issues to be Probe (test pieces)? Perhaps they are patterns before the "Proof" issues were minted?
Anyway, I'm after the last Austrian Gold coin I need to complete my set of Austrian Music coins (composers). I ordered one on Ma-Shops because the dealer says he accepts PayPal. (I would pay a premium) but his invoice wants international bank transfer. My bank doesn't do that so we'll see if we can come up with "plan B".  The price has dropped somewhat with the price of gold so it is a bit more affordable...and the exchange rate from $ to Euro is a bit "better" (from MY perspective anyway.)

My collecting has been terribly neglected, but now that we have sold the Florida house, I hope to be a little less tied up with renters, bills, worry and all the "fun" stuff that comes with owning a rental property. Never again!

Just a non-related interesting piece of coin show trivia...we moved out of Rhode Island (the smallest U.S. state) about 2 years ago into Massachusetts. I recently learned why there were never coin shows in Rhode Island. Apparently a "big wig" politician had some coins stolen at a R.I. show, so he ran a law through making shows illegal. Or so I was told. I haven't been to a show in years as my interest in collecting is so specialized...but Boston has a couple of big ones each year. Maybe sometime I'll go. It's only about a 45 minute train ride into Boston and a short walk to the hotel where they are held. . I'll start saving my pennies...oooops...I mean my "cents".

Alan  Massachusetts

Be well, everyone.  Alan  Massachusetts, U.S.A.
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: chrisild on May 29, 2012, 03:57:30 AM
Now that I think about it, I have several Chopin Pieces from Poland marked "Probe".  Does the Polish mint (or DID the Polish mint) consider proof issues to be Probe (test pieces)?
Yes, I think so. At least in the years of the socialist republic (PRL) they issued many pieces that would say "PRÓBA". Usually those had designs that were from the design of the actual coin.

As mentioned before, the common German word for "proof" is "Polierte Platte" or just PP. The German mints and the Numismatic Office (VfS) however use "Spiegelglanz" for the German coins. The accurate English equivalent is "prooflike", I think, but most will simply call them "proof". - The term "Spiegelglanz" should not be mixed up with "Stempelglanz" (st) which by and large means BU.

Quote
I'll start saving my pennies...oooops...I mean my "cents".

Oh you Americans. 8) You'll say "penny" when you mean a cent, and I even got corrected when I referred to those "paper rectangles" as dollar notes. Nooo, that is what others use, we call 'em bills. Did not help that I pointed at the spot where it says Federal Reserve Note, hehe.

Christian
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Figleaf on May 29, 2012, 09:38:35 AM
Everything is always more complicated :) In English, the word proof can also mean test (as in waterproof). Patterns meant to get approval for a design can very wel be proofs. :-[

Peter
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: FosseWay on May 29, 2012, 11:33:52 AM
In my profession, proofs are something you generate and check for errors before you produce the finished product, so directly similar to the German Probe and other similar words in other languages.

By extension, 'proof' is also used for something that has been checked and shown to work (waterproof) or be valid (proof of guilt or innocence in a trial). But the English use of the word to mean a 'presentation set of coins struck to a higher than normal standard' is rather odd; it would make more sense to use a translation of polierte Platte or similar.
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Arminius on May 29, 2012, 11:50:58 AM
The most probable translation for numismatic discussions and catalogisations would be "Polierte Platte".

(However in Franconia and Saxony you have to say "Bolierde Bladde" to be understood correctly.)

 ;)
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: <k> on May 29, 2012, 12:18:46 PM
In the UK, a proof coin is said to be one that was minted under proof conditions, but the coin's original state should therefore be FDC: fleur de coin. That is why in English you see the term Proof FDC. However, if such a coin escapes into circulation, it could become Proof EF, Proof VF, or whatever. I have one or two coins with mirrored fields and frosted features that look "proof VF".
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: paisepagal on May 29, 2012, 12:52:52 PM
As mentioned before, the common German word for "proof" is "Polierte Platte" or just PP. The German mints and the Numismatic Office (VfS) however use "Spiegelglanz" for the German coins. The accurate English equivalent is "prooflike", I think, but most will simply call them "proof". - The term "Spiegelglanz" should not be mixed up with "Stempelglanz" (st) which by and large means Bu

I do see prägequalität along with PP quite often ... So where does that fit in ? Or is it more generic ?
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Afrasi on May 29, 2012, 01:45:00 PM
I don't understand exactly, what you are meaning, but I suppose you did find the word between others: "geprägt in der höchsten Prägeqalität "Polierte Platte" " (minted in the highest minting quality "proof"), which is a common term in advertising poor medals für high prices ...  ;D

Christian is absolutely right: Usually you can compare Proof with Polierte Platte, which means polished dies. But exactly German PP's are Prooflike (polished dies, but without frosted features).
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Prosit on May 29, 2012, 02:26:26 PM
Don't forget the sepcial uncirculated "handgehoben".  They look like proof to me.
Dale
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Afrasi on May 29, 2012, 02:31:36 PM
That's a special Austrian thing, and my Austrian friends don't like to be mixed up with German matters ...  ;D
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Alan Glasser on May 29, 2012, 03:13:57 PM
WOW! I feel like an expert now. The coin I ordered is a poliertie Plat which is exactly what I wanted. I was a bit confused when I did the German English Translation site and it came up "shined", but I uinderstand what they mean by that. In by college German days I remember spiegel as "Mirror" (I think) so I guess that contributed to my confusion.

Gee...when I get to be world president, I'm going to standardize all the terminology for coin grades...maybe a number system?? It would avoid a lot of confusion.

Thanks for the terrific replies, all. What a smart group!!

Alan   Massachusetts
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: Bimat on May 29, 2012, 04:26:48 PM
Don't forget the sepcial uncirculated "handgehoben".  They look like proof to me.

Is that same as HgH? (I think so!)

Aditya
Title: Re: How do you say "PROOF" in German?
Post by: chrisild on May 29, 2012, 09:46:48 PM
Is that same as HgH? (I think so!)

Right, "hgh" is just the abbreviation of "handgehoben" ...

Christian