World of Coins

Modern coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens of other continents => Sub-Saharan Africa => Topic started by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 03:55:19 AM

Title: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 03:55:19 AM
This topic presents a series of numismatic portraits of political leaders from sub-Saharan Africa, with brief accompanying details, mostly taken from Wikipedia.



To post comments on this topic, please click on the link below:

Comments on "Portraits of African Leaders" (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,13661.0.html)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 03:55:31 AM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-DLlpiJT55Ho/TzmTPUZ9-_I/AAAAAAAAF80/sFfnqrFQ6sU/s216/Seretse%2520Khama.jpg)

Sir Seretse Khama (1921 – 1980) was a statesman from Botswana. Born into one of the more powerful of the royal families of what was then the British Protectorate of Bechuanaland, and educated abroad in neighbouring South Africa and in the United Kingdom, he returned home to lead his country's independence movement. He founded the Botswana Democratic Party in 1962 and became Prime Minister in 1965. In 1966, Botswana gained independence and Khama became its first president. Khama remained president until his death from pancreatic cancer in 1980, when he was succeeded by Vice President Quett Masire.

See Wikipedia: Seretse Khama (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seretse_Khama)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-J0WZfK8DOOA/TzmSnY3sUoI/AAAAAAAAF8s/SoPDyDHoCCo/s457/Botswana%25201966%252050c.jpg)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ipJW_c8brww/TzmVyYuwrlI/AAAAAAAAF9U/fqgbdFxXc3k/s690/Botswana%2520150%2520pula%25201970.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 03:57:02 AM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-zZWvowkZF_o/TzmyWtqm8nI/AAAAAAAAGAY/MeMylsoe3OQ/s480/Mwambutsa%2520IV.jpeg)

King Mwambutsa IV Bangiricenge (1912 - 1977) was the king of Burundi from 1915 to 1966. He was given the title of Mwami, or King. He succeeded Mutaga IV Mbikije. Like other Burundian kings, he was an ethnic Ganwa. During the early part of his reign, Burundi was transferred from Germany to Belgium following World War I. He was the leader of Burundi when it was granted independence in 1962, and he created a constitutional monarchy, which suffered much turmoi,l including the assassinations of at least three prime ministers. He had to continue switching prime ministers to stay in favor with both Hutus and Tutsis. He was deposed by his son Ntare V in 1966 and fled to Switzerland, where he spent the rest of his life until he died in 1977.

See Wikipedia: Mwambutsa IV, Bangiriceng of Burundi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mwambutsa_IV_Bangiriceng_of_Burundi)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-MU9iBYEE9vM/TzmyWp4HNbI/AAAAAAAAGAc/tnOaEQbwzO0/s597/Burundi%2520100%2520francs%25201962.jpg)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ShdsijJefyM/TzmyWpTz4AI/AAAAAAAAGAU/sNkvarp_XV0/s678/Burundi%2520100%2520francs%25201965.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:54:18 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-8W4y472N9nY/TzqiQxCokLI/AAAAAAAAGEU/MseZBXHmAFY/s128/Ntare%20V.jpeg)

Ntare V of Burundi (1947 - 1972) was the king of Burundi from June to November 1966. Until his accession, he was known as Crown Prince Charles Ndizeye. He deposed his father, Mwambutsa IV  in 1966. Ntare was himself deposed in a military coup led by Michel Micombero in 1966. The King went into exile in West Germany but returned to Burundi in April 1972. Soon afterwards the Hutus began an uprising against the government. On April 29, reportedly at the behest of President Micombero, Ntare was executed at the Ibwami royal palace in Gitega. The Hutu uprising was quelled by Micombero's forces. About 150,000 people, mostly Hutus, died in the ensuing inter-tribal fighting.

See Wikipedia: Ntare V of Burundi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ntare_V_of_Burundi)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-UskmFDYgEOQ/TzqiIhV_rjI/AAAAAAAAGC8/fkt5RgbHD8Y/s505/Burundi%252050%2520fr%25201966.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:56:17 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Vbe6xEd8ZjI/TzqiKu1hNrI/AAAAAAAAGDk/onLq0KtriaY/s153/Micombero.jpg)

Michel Micombero (1940 – 1983) was the first President of Burundi from 1966 to 1976. He was an ethnic Tutsi. Micombero became Prime Minister on July 11 1966, and was the real power in the nation technically ruled by King Ntare V, who had deposed his father with the help of Micombero. On November 28, 1966, Micombero overthrew the monarchy and made himself president. He was overthrown in 1976 in a coup by Deputy Chief of Staff Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, a distant relative of Micombero from the same clan and political faction. Micombero went into exile in Somalia, where he died of a heart attack in 1983.

See Wikipedia: Michel Micombero (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Micombero)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-hkwHGy9OQuk/TzqiIljEUYI/AAAAAAAAGC4/44u3FtOnIws/s550/Burundi%2520100fr%25201967.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:57:16 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-HCpzA74d1yo/Tzm3-lo277I/AAAAAAAAGA8/OQlTa_4SslU/s250/Ahmadou.jpg)

Ahmadou Ahidjo (1924-1989) was the president of the Federal Republic of Cameroon from 1960 until 1982. He resigned the presidency in November 1982 and handed over power to his prime minister and long-time associate, Paul Biya, but stayed on as head of the country's single political party. A power struggle broke out, however, and Ahidjo was accused of plotting against the government.

He went into exile in France in August 1983 and in early 1984 was sentenced to death in absentia by a Cameroon court. Though the sentence was later commuted to an indefinite term of detention, Ahidjo never returned to Cameroon. He died of a heart attack on November 30th, 1989, in Dakar, Senegal.

See Encyclopedia.com: Ahmadou Ahidjo (http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Ahmadou_Ahidjo.aspx)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-qRxoQJmn9ag/Tzm3-seqloI/AAAAAAAAGBA/OyGxF4VIXZE/s700/Cameroon%25201970%2520President%2520El%2520Hajj%2520Ahmadou%2520Ahidjo%2520l.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:57:35 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-cVZnBohqYhA/Tzm7LjLzfKI/AAAAAAAAGBc/HA5NyA5Im70/s340/Jean-B%25C3%25A9del%2520Bokassa.jpg)

Jean-Bédel Bokassa (1921 – 1996), also known as Bokassa I of Central Africa and Salah Eddine Ahmed Bokassa, a military officer, was the head of state of the Central African Republic and its successor state, the Central African Empire, from his coup d'état on 1 January 1966 until 20 September 1979. Of this period, he served almost eleven years (1 January 1966–4 December 1976) as president (president for life in 1972–1976), and for almost three years he reigned as emperor (4 December 1976—20 September 1979). Although Bokassa was formally crowned in December 1977, his imperial title did not achieve worldwide diplomatic recognition.

After his overthrow in 1979, Central Africa reverted to its former name and status as the Central African Republic, and the former Bokassa I went into exile. He returned to Central Africa in 1986, was put on trial for treason and murder and convicted of these offenses in 1987, and was imprisoned in 1987—1993. Bokassa lived in private life in his former capital, Bangui, until his death in November 1996.

See Wikipedia: Jean-Bédel Bokassa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-B%C3%A9del_Bokassa)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-fWLCoL_0dDA/Tzm7MF9d-XI/AAAAAAAAGBk/pfNxAVCZ2gg/s684/Central%2520African%2520Republic%25201970%252020%252C000fr.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:57:54 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-G1JxTxeZFKE/Tzm5jTYVfiI/AAAAAAAAGBQ/RHjjjsnm2OQ/s216/nagarta.jpg)

François Tombalbaye (1918 – 1975), was a teacher and trade union activist who served as the first president of Chad. Tombalbaye succeeded Gabriel Lisette as head of the Chadian Progressive Party (PPT), heading Chad's colonial government from 1959. He ruled the country during its independence on August 11, 1960, and was appointed its first head of government. On April 13, 1975, after some of the country's leading officers had been arrested for involvement in an alleged coup, a group of soldiers killed Tombalbaye and installed Félix Malloum, by then a general, as the new head of state.

See Wikipedia: François Tombalbaye (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%C3%A7ois_Tombalbaye)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-tg468TY813g/Tzm5jaHWFfI/AAAAAAAAGBM/Mtcx-NbBm5k/s680/Chad%2520President%2520Fran%25C3%25A7ois%2520Tombalbaye.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:58:11 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9499.0;attach=72161;image)

Joseph Kasa-Vubu (1910? – 1969) was the first President (1960–1965) of the Republic of the Congo, today called the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Kasa-Vubu was a leader of the ABAKO (Alliance des Bakongo) Movement of his own lower Congo River Bakongo people. Upon Congo's independence from Belgium, he was elected president by the Congo's new national assembly, taking office on June 30, 1960.

The new republic was immediately disrupted by political and military strife and regional secessionist movements, while the central government was paralyzed by conflict between the conservative Kasa-Vubu and his nationalistic prime minister Patrice Lumumba. On September 5, Kasa-Vubu dismissed Lumumba but the prime minister refused to accept this and in turn announced Kasa-Vubu's dismissal, creating a stalemate that was only ended on September 14 with army commander Joseph Mobutu's seizure of power and arrest of Lumumba. Lumumba was later handed to secessionist forces in the southern province of Katanga and killed.

Over the next five years, Kasa-Vubu presided over a succession of weak governments. In July 1964 he appointed former Katangan secessionist leader Moise Tshombe as prime minister and permitted the use of European mercenaries against leftist rebels. Mobutu seized power for a second time on November 25, 1965, this time deposing Kasa-Vubu and subsequently declaring himself head of state. Kasavubu then retired to his farm at Boma on the lower Congo River, where he died in 1969.

See also:

1] Wikipedia: Joseph Kasa-Vubu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Kasa-Vubu)

2] Britannica.com: Joseph Kasavubu (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/312838/Joseph-Kasavubu)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-bVUd2ow6cyo/Tzm9EQ5YUMI/AAAAAAAAGBs/1OG66CVgLyM/s610/Congo.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:58:32 PM
Joseph Mobutu was president of the Republic of the Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Zaire - different names for the same country.

See: Zaire, and the many faces of Mobutu (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9499.0.html)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9499.0;attach=72166;image)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-KF9AMVWSonY/TzmUA2HoMJI/AAAAAAAAF88/w4wYRmhk-6w/s364/Zaire%25205Z%25201970.jpg)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-4s59OhyvmM0/TzmUA3YLyiI/AAAAAAAAF9E/_LCZ_zn9A7M/s685/Congo%252050M%25201970.jpg)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-rjVaVjABXCA/TznJ4XkN3PI/AAAAAAAAGCs/juUaHL7i2EM/s670/Congo%25205%2520makuta.jpg)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9499.0;attach=72170;image) (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9499.0;attach=72172;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9499.0;attach=72173;image) (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9499.0;attach=72175;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:59:11 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-b0hA2BrAPS4/TznB2ykhojI/AAAAAAAAGB4/Oc4tF7ELYWk/s326/Dahomey%2520Presidents.jpg)

Sourou-Migan Apithy, Justin Ahomadégbé-Tomêtin, and Hubert Maga were members of the Presidential Council of the Republic of Dahomey (now Benin), from 1970 to 1972.

See the following Wikipedia articles:

1] Sourou-Migan Apithy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sourou-Migan_Apithy)

2] Justin Ahomadégbé-Tomêtin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justin_Ahomad%C3%A9gb%C3%A9-Tom%C3%AAtin)

3] Hubert Maga (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubert_Maga)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-uMjreAqjKjM/TznB24g9zlI/AAAAAAAAGB0/njE4JvKq7eg/s622/Dahomey%25201971%252025%252C000fr.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:59:41 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-OLOK6OuKJaA/TzmYLeaMEMI/AAAAAAAAF90/RqB2IqmimB8/s274/Francisco%2520Mac%25C3%25ADas%2520Nguema.jpg)

Formerly the colony of Spanish Guinea, Equatorial Guinea became independent on October 12, 1968. In September 1968, Francisco Macías Nguema had been elected first president of Equatorial Guinea, and in July 1970 he created a single-party state. Nguema’s reign of terror led to the death or exile of up to 1/3 of the country's population. Out of a population of 300,000, an estimated 80,000 were killed. Teodoro Obiang deposed Francisco Macías Nguema on August 3, 1979, in a bloody coup d'état. Nguema was sentenced to death and executed by firing squad. Teodoro Obiang remains the president of Equatorial Guinea.

See Wikipedia: Francisco Macías Nguema (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Mac%C3%ADas_Nguema)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-5-W6i_CQe74/TzmYKTd-zvI/AAAAAAAAF9c/lfJjOYYWVWc/s298/EG%25202000%2520ekuele%25201978.jpg)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-S8ALI9B44Mw/TzmYK8O6i7I/AAAAAAAAF9k/KRUt2qKPL8s/s322/EG%2520Equatorial%2520Guinea%25201970%2520200%2520Ptas.JPG)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-8dmiZqmc4Rs/TzmYKs9O1LI/AAAAAAAAF9s/w_YMtdl-aMY/s328/EG%2520Equatorial%2520Guinea%25201%2520ekuele%25201975.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 07:59:57 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-L8v7h1Yin-E/TzmYLrzdW9I/AAAAAAAAF94/ib7vYaCn1VU/s227/Teodoro_Obian.jpg)

Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, current president of Equatorial Guinea.

See Wikipedia: Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teodoro_Obiang_Nguema_Mbasogo)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Q8glLgPmEe8/TzmYKbPE7KI/AAAAAAAAF9g/3QPZOGZ51SU/s220/EG%25201980-50%2520Bipkwele.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:00:13 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Loxylb21nqw/TzXFRxEF8qI/AAAAAAAAFu4/4azRDN9EZmc/s316/Menelik_II_Ethiopia.jpg)

Menelik II of Ethiopia.

See:

1] Ethiopian Birr EE1892(AD1900) (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,6853.0.html)

2] Wikipedia: Menelik II of Ethiopia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menelik_II_of_Ethiopia)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6853.0;attach=9406;image)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:00:27 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-xIxkgUPA_rc/TzXFR5cb8kI/AAAAAAAAFu0/QYJRMFu-Qmk/s247/Haile%2520Selassie.jpeg)

Haile Selassie I (1892-1975) was the last emperor of Ethiopia (1930-1936, 1941-1974 AD). He was overthrown in 1974 and died in prison in 1975.

See Wikipedia: Haile Selassie I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haile_Selassie_I)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-p2zGiQHvYg4/TzbJ23jC8iI/AAAAAAAAFz8/dy5tE6V9jI4/s400/Ethiopia%25201936%25201c.jpg)

Ethiopia 1 Cent



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4236.0;attach=4654;image)

50 Matonas EE1923 / 1930AD
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:00:52 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-WMq0QmItmmA/Tzbo7Fy3kKI/AAAAAAAAF1s/J61DSTvnILY/s255/Leon%2520Mba.jpg)

Gabriel Léon M'ba (1902 – 1967) was the first Prime Minister (1959–1961) and President (1961–1967) of Gabon. In August 1966, M'ba was admitted to the Hôpital Charles Bernard, a hospital in Paris. Despite his inability to govern, the president clung to his power, and in presidential elections held on 19 March 1967, M'ba was re-elected with 99.9% of the vote. On 27 November 1967, just days after he took his presidential oath at the Gabonese embassy in France, M'ba died from cancer in Paris.

See Wikipedia: Léon M'ba (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9on_M%27ba)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-2gfuceBJRV0/Tzmagyl8bAI/AAAAAAAAF-Y/H4BcFshz5Iw/s688/Gabon.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:01:06 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Ppho564ZYyo/TzamVMAAeWI/AAAAAAAAFwQ/HnlSlhy1qmM/s295/Sir%2520Dawda.jpg)

Sir Dawda Kairaba Jawara (born May 16, 1924) was the first leader of The Gambia, serving first as Prime Minister from 1962 to 1970 and then as President from 1970 to 1994.



See Wikipedia: Dawda Jawara (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawda_Jawara)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-QeAl6ehvUis/Tzmag2LWNoI/AAAAAAAAF-U/_p4RjyS5Aec/s450/Gambia-obverse.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:01:20 PM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Kwame_Nkrumah_%28JFKWHP-AR6409-A%29.jpg)

Ghana, formerly known as The Gold Coast, achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1957.

Kwame Nkrumah (1909 – 1972) was the leader of Ghana and its predecessor state, the Gold Coast, from 1952 to 1966. Overseeing the nation's independence from British colonial rule in 1957, Nkrumah was the first President of Ghana and the first Prime Minister of Ghana. An influential 20th-century advocate of Pan-Africanism, he was a founding member of the Organization of African Unity and was the winner of the Lenin Peace Prize in 1963.

In February 1966, while Nkrumah was on a state visit to North Vietnam and China, his government was overthrown in a military coup. Nkrumah never returned to Ghana, but he continued to push for his vision of African unity. He lived in exile in Conakry, Guinea, as the guest of President Ahmed Sékou Touré, who made him honorary co-president of the country. In failing health, he flew to Bucharest, Romania, for medical treatment in August 1971. He died of skin cancer in April 1972 at the age of 62.

See Wikipedia: Kwame Nkrumah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwame_Nkrumah)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=77584;image)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-WhkZe5lqlBY/TzmcYZqA5DI/AAAAAAAAF-o/BAQq1PS7fI0/s594/Ghana%2520%25C2%25A32%25201965.jpg)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4-9Ep7pWe88/TzmcYRwUXTI/AAAAAAAAF-k/mg4fDxWVNMU/s700/Ghana%2520%25C2%25A32%25201960.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:01:39 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kRe74_vQL0g/Tzm1MCbe4QI/AAAAAAAAGAw/AOe2VnPt96Q/s190/Acheampong.jpg)

General (then Colonel) Ignatius Kutu Acheampong (1931 – 1979) was a former military head of state of Ghana. He ruled from 13 January 1972 to 5 July 1978, when he was deposed in a palace coup. He was later executed by firing squad.

See Ignatius Kutu Acheampong (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignatius_Kutu_Acheampong)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-u3PSMwiBs3c/Tzm1MGbpqkI/AAAAAAAAGAs/LlZuaDbepR4/s629/Ghana%2520%25C2%25A32%25201977.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:01:58 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-a5C1RFY4iRA/TzXGuOTavuI/AAAAAAAAFvU/9NDZKFk1EE0/s400/Sekou%2520Toure.jpeg)

Ahmed Sékou Touré  (1922 – 1984) was President of Guinea (formerly French Guinea) from 1958 to his death in 1984. He died while undergoing cardiac treatment at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio.

See Wikipedia: Ahmed Sékou Touré (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmed_S%C3%A9kou_Tour%C3%A9)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-cJLBfkLaMfo/TzqiKEzZlkI/AAAAAAAAGDY/s9QwMAgNHdo/s631/Guinea%25205f%25201962.jpg)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-CrFC1iX7Kxs/TzqiKNjS7XI/AAAAAAAAGDc/PNEfmlRfRPk/s651/Guinea%252025fr%25201962.jpg)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-nzvMCjsFQ8U/TzqiJbtKJRI/AAAAAAAAGDM/neA0Li4oZQU/s632/Guinea%252010fr%25201958.JPG)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-CEtdJxO7UZM/TzqiJWHhFAI/AAAAAAAAGDI/_Lm7HGEKPVE/s665/Guinea%252010f%25201962.JPG)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-JpE9KIbcoyo/TzmdbJIDuWI/AAAAAAAAF-0/5_opwsQegRE/s626/Guinea.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:02:16 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-CJ0k5yU3_tM/Tzb3yR-XXlI/AAAAAAAAF2k/wKKnrriGwTg/s323/Houphouet-Boigny.jpg)

Félix Houphouët-Boigny (1905 – 1993) was the first President of Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire).

See Wikipedia: Félix Houphouët-Boigny (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%A9lix_Houphou%C3%ABt-Boigny)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=78796;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:02:42 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-v3pgpVEe41E/TzaUesg-cGI/AAAAAAAAFv4/b2lkqTfmmIc/s166/JomoKenyatta.gif)

Jomo Kenyatta (c. 1890s – 1978) served as the first Prime Minister (1963–1964) and President (1964–1978) of Kenya. He is considered the founding father of the Kenyan nation. In 1947 he was elected president of the Kenya African Union, but in 1952 he was arrested and charged with being a member of the Mau Mau Society. He was imprisoned from 1953 to 1960 but was admitted into the Legislative Council after his release in 1961. In 1961 and 1962 he led the KANU delegation to first and second Lancaster Conference in London where Kenya's independence constitution was negotiated.

Elections were held in May 1963, which KANU won. On 1 June 1963, Kenyatta became prime minister of the autonomous Kenyan government, with Queen Elizabeth II remaining as Head of State, styled "Queen of Kenya". Kenyatta consistently asked white settlers not to leave Kenya and supported reconciliation. He retained the role of prime minister after independence was declared on 12 December 1963. On 1 June 1964, Kenyatta became President when he successfully had Parliament amend the Constitution to make Kenya a republic with his office becoming executive President: the head of State, head of Government, and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. On 10 November 1964, KADU officially dissolved and its representatives joined KANU, forming a single party.

On 22 August 1978, President Kenyatta died in Mombasa of natural causes attributable to old age.

See Wikipedia: Jomo Kenyatta (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jomo_Kenyatta)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-389dOoIaBMU/UBfkBLxjaaI/AAAAAAAAJY4/X90wH8OY9uU/s675/Kenya%252050c%25201969.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:02:58 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=91943;image)

Daniel Toroitich arap Moi (born 1924) was the President of Kenya from 1978 to 2002. Previously, under President Jomo Kenyatta, he was Vice-President from 1967 to 1978; he succeeded Kenyatta as President upon the latter's death. Moi was constitutionally barred from running in the 2002 presidential elections. He was succeeded as president by Mwai Kibaki.

See Wikipedia: Daniel arap Moi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_arap_Moi)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-M3cMoVThSn4/UBfkBhRXgqI/AAAAAAAAJZE/LcN40JXfE_M/s512/Kenya%25205s%25201985.JPG)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Gl6iP0dTKrY/UBfkBeoK3tI/AAAAAAAAJZA/z8sbERX72is/s511/Kenya%25205s%25201985-.JPG)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:03:13 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=91739;image)

Mwai Kibaki (born 1931) has been the third President of Kenya since December 2002. Kibaki was previously Vice-President of Kenya for ten years from 1978 to 1988 and also held cabinet ministerial positions.

See Wikipedia: Mwai Kibaki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mwai_Kibaki)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=91740;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:03:29 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=88948;image)

Moshoeshoe II (1938 – 1996), previously known as Constantine Bereng Seeiso, was the paramount chief of Lesotho, succeeding paramount chief Seeiso from 1960 until the country gained full independence from Britain in 1966. He was king of Lesotho from 1966 until his death in 1996.

See Wikipedia: Moshoeshoe II of Lesotho (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moshoeshoe_II_of_Lesotho)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=37447.0;attach=88947;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33427.0;attach=57835;image)

From Wikipedia:

Letsie III (born David Mohato Bereng Seeiso; 17 July 1963) is the king of Lesotho. He succeeded his father, Moshoeshoe II, when the latter was forced into exile in 1990. His father was briefly restored in 1995 but died in a car crash in early 1996, and Letsie became king again. As a constitutional monarch, most of King Letsie's duties as monarch of Lesotho are ceremonial.

He was educated in the United Kingdom at Ampleforth College. From there he went on to study at the National University of Lesotho where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Law. He then went on to study at the University of Bristol, the University of Cambridge, and the University of London. He completed his studies in 1989, when he returned to Lesotho.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=33427.0;attach=57836;image)

Lesotho, 250 maloti, 1997.  A gold coin issued to commemorate the coronation of King Letsie III.

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:03:44 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Hftx38PAhko/TznG77pIUGI/AAAAAAAAGCU/h-QaKVRzWlo/s435/V%2520S%2520Tubman.jpg)

William Vacanarat Shadrach Tubman (1895 – 1971) was a Liberian politician. He was the 19th President of Liberia from 1944 until his death in 1971.

See Wikipedia: William Tubman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tubman)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-LKVGZxFODAo/TznG7n8wTtI/AAAAAAAAGCM/KorcXP7ihhA/s462/Liberia%25202.jpg)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-64ObKqMQvIc/TznG7Hz5IcI/AAAAAAAAGCQ/G05WXfYeamM/s539/Liberia%2520%252425%25201965.jpg)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-oo5xg57R26o/TznG7MIqQHI/AAAAAAAAGCI/EVloK9QRJbA/s545/Liberia%2520%252412%25201965.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:03:59 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8uLIanZ9Jr0/Tza2Hkrbj0I/AAAAAAAAFyE/t2QQ91rg-O8/s320/William%2520R%2520Tolbert.jpg)

William Richard Tolbert, Jr. (1913 – 1980) was the 20th President of Liberia from 1971 to 1980. Trained as a civil servant, he entered the country's House of Representatives in 1955 for the True Whig Party, then the only established party in the country. He was elected Vice president to William Tubman in 1952 and served in that position until Tubman's death in 1971.

In the early hours of 12 April 1980, 17 non-commissioned officers and soldiers of the Armed Forces of Liberia, led by Master Sergeant Samuel Doe, launched a violent coup d'état. The group entered the Presidential palace and killed Tolbert. Tolbert's body was dumped into a mass grave together with 27 other victims of the coup.

See Wikipedia: William R. Tolbert, Jr. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_R._Tolbert,_Jr.)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-QqDU_rWEK2M/Tza2HgvfBlI/AAAAAAAAFyI/07PGrNOmNSQ/s337/Liberia%252025c%25201976.jpg)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-7HTXx9HpBe8/TznG7HeajkI/AAAAAAAAGCE/xULhj4kpKrA/s462/Liberia%2520%252420%25201972.jpg)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-V4oh6n5mJVE/TzmfCsAo2DI/AAAAAAAAF-8/i3exPtIlC3U/s546/Liberia%2520%2524100%25201979.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:04:19 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-klnSPjXhpjQ/Tza8pgzDmgI/AAAAAAAAFyo/6PlOiI9Vo3U/s203/Kamuzu.jpg)

Hastings Kamuzu Banda (1898 – 1997) was the leader of Malawi and its predecessor state, Nyasaland, from 1961 to 1994. After receiving much of his education overseas, Banda returned to his home country (then British Nyasaland) to speak against colonialism and advocate independence. In 1963 he was formally appointed Nyasaland’s Prime Minister, and led the country to independence as Malawi a year later. Two years later, he proclaimed Malawi a republic with himself as president. He consolidated power and later declared Malawi a one party state under the Malawi Congress Party (MCP). In 1970, the MCP made him the party’s President for Life. In 1971, he became President for Life of Malawi itself.

As a leader of the pro-Western bloc in Africa, he received support from the West during the Cold War. He generally supported women’s rights, improved the country’s infrastructure, and maintained a good educational system relative to other African countries. However, he presided over one of the most repressive regimes in Africa. He also faced scorn for maintaining full diplomatic relations with apartheid-era South Africa. By 1993, he was facing international pressure and widespread protest. A referendum ended his one party state, and a special assembly stripped him of his title. Banda ran for president in the democratic elections which followed, but was defeated. He died in South Africa in 1997.

See Wikipedia: Hastings Banda (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hastings_Banda)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-9tCk3IFy6Lw/Tza8pgTPZ0I/AAAAAAAAFyk/ZXcOGNXBGxM/s385/Malawi%252010K%25201978.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:04:32 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-VbKEMBT2eGw/Tza-ZkZcEWI/AAAAAAAAFzI/3Ydxvg25zGo/s282/Muluzi.jpg)

Elson Bakili Muluzi (born 1943) is a Malawian politician. He was the President of Malawi from 1994 to 2004 and was Chairman of the United Democratic Front (UDF) until 2009.

See Wikipedia: Bakili Muluzi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakili_Muluzi)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/--Xf0TMERERA/Tza-ZneB8CI/AAAAAAAAFzE/pt9XLg6sMKg/s402/Malawi.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:04:48 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-L6fL_NhskH4/Tzbhg_IdCYI/AAAAAAAAF0w/GoWjgO8XfAM/s400/Modibo%2520Keita.jpg)

Modibo Keita (1915 - 1977) was the first President of Mali (1960–1968) and the Prime Minister of the Mali Federation. He espoused a form of African socialism. On November 19 1968 General Moussa Traoré organized a coup d'état against Modibo Keïta, and sent him to prison in the northern Malian town of Kidal. After being transferred back to the capital Bamako in February 1977 in what was claimed to be an action by the government towards national reconciliation in preparation for his release, Modibo Keïta died, still a prisoner, on May 16, 1977.

See Wikipedia: Modibo Keita (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modibo_Ke%C3%AFta)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LpaqReNUHJE/Tzbhg7T9R4I/AAAAAAAAF0s/DS8KXAIdAUY/s660/Mali%252010%2520francs%25201960.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:05:02 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-cYn-r1vumTU/Tzg-dGdouFI/AAAAAAAAF8U/mbSCfw8BSDI/s224/Seewoosagur%2520Ramgoolam.jpg)

Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam (1900 - 1985) was the first Chief Minister, Prime Minister and sixth Governor General of Mauritius. He served as Chief Minister from 1961 to 1968, prime minister from 1968 until 1982 and lastly as Governor General from 1983 to 1985. He is known as the "Father of the Nation". As decolonisation swept the third world, he led Mauritius to independence from the United Kingdom in 1968.

Ramgoolam was defeated in the 1982 general elections by the MMM-PSM coalition. He died in 1985, aged 85.

See Wikipedia: Seewoosagur Ramgoolam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seewoosagur_Ramgoolam)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-THuPQxCe7Ro/Tzg9THefRvI/AAAAAAAAF8M/bm8lG6a8Rf4/s388/Mauritius%252020R%25202007.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:05:16 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-In4I8oXXJSs/TzmlkddBYjI/AAAAAAAAF_M/jtrgKdBw3Kk/s203/Anerood%2520Jugnauth.jpg)

Sir Anerood Jugnauth (born 1930) is the President of Mauritius and all its dependencies. He is the Commander in Chief and Head of state incumbent since 2003 following his election in 2003 and 2008. He served as prime minister from 1982 to 1995 in four consecutive terms and then was voted out of office from 1995 to 2000. He was the prime minister who held the office for the longest run, one of 16 years, overtaking Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, who held the office for 14 years. As leader of the Militant Socialist Movement, he became prime minister again, after the 2000 elections, for his fifth term. His alliance partner, Paul Bérenger of the Mauritian Militant Movement, succeeded him in 2003 after serving as Jugnauth's deputy for three years. Jugnauth was then elected president in 2003.

See Wikipedia: Anerood Jugnauth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anerood_Jugnauth)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-v9uRM1LbgPM/TzmlkSRKY9I/AAAAAAAAF_Q/bBng61Hqjsc/s596/Mauritius.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:05:36 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-yWPFHlBRD6c/TzbHZQtkkeI/AAAAAAAAFzk/uKtdF0NaDyA/s315/samora-machel.jpg)

Samora Moisés Machel (1933 – 1986) was a Mozambican military commander, revolutionary socialist leader and eventual President of Mozambique. Machel led the country from independence in 1975 until his death in 1986, when his presidential aircraft crashed in mountainous terrain where the borders of Mozambique, Swaziland and South Africa converge.

See Wikipedia: Samora Machel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samora_Machel)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-jr_NZKKnF3o/T6gMU_eWssI/AAAAAAAAHdg/DbM8MWjIuV8/s396/Moz.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:05:50 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-xTBC3ZBH81g/TzbOnYPlw4I/AAAAAAAAF0U/N4NRNrpXNj4/s269/Sam%2520Nujoma.jpg)

Samuel Daniel Shafiishuna Nujoma (born 1929) is a Namibian politician who was the first President of Namibia from 1990 to 2005. He led the South-West Africa People's Organisation (SWAPO) in its long struggle against South African rule and took office as President when Namibia obtained independence on 21 March 1990. He was subsequently re-elected in 1994 and 1999, remaining in office until March 2005. He was President of SWAPO from its founding in 1960 until 2007.

See Wikipedia: Sam Nujoma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Nujoma)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13661.0;attach=20502;image)(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13661.0;attach=20503;image)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:06:06 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-V90G7jjLpPE/Tzbkjas7NEI/AAAAAAAAF1Q/gNXIEAQmYZg/s209/Diori%2520Hamani.jpg)

Hamani Diori (1916 – 1989) became the first President of the Republic of Niger in 1960, when Niger gained independence from France. On 15 April 1974, Lieutenant Colonel Seyni Kountché led a military coup that ended Diori's rule. Diori was imprisoned for six years. After his release in 1980, he remained under house arrest until 1987. After being released from house arrest, he moved to Morocco, where he died on 23 April 1989 at the age of 72.

See Wikipedia: Hamani Diori (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamani_Diori)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-WWv83EXUnBQ/Tzbkjb1pNQI/AAAAAAAAF1M/5vZFor7zmJ8/s635/Niger%2520500%2520francs%25201960.jpg)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-XExM4Tqheu0/Tzmf02d2o-I/AAAAAAAAF_E/XTjQWWZh054/s607/Niger%2520100fr%25201968.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:06:22 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-iK-am9Gf9YI/Tzb_UhFuhOI/AAAAAAAAF3E/eUVAP9e2CTU/s356/Kayibanda.jpg)

Grégoire Kayibanda (1924 – 1976) was the first elected and second President of the Republic of Rwanda. He led Rwanda's struggle for independence from Belgium, and replaced the Tutsi monarchy with a republican form of government. He asserted Hutu majority power. Kayibanda served as President of Rwanda from 1962 until July 5, 1973, when he was overthrown by his defense minister Major General Juvénal Habyarimana in a military coup. The new government held Kayibanda and his wife in a secret location, where they were reportedly starved to death.

See Wikipedia: Grégoire Kayibanda (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gr%C3%A9goire_Kayibanda)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-mFM_m-4aYEs/Tzb_UhWsY2I/AAAAAAAAF3A/hffJNi84nyc/s363/Rwanda%252010%2520Franc%25201964.jpg)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=80418;image)

 

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:06:41 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-KdjRTvvYV0s/TzcF7Waf7sI/AAAAAAAAF3k/PER7VDdMesE/s399/Juvenal%2520Habyarimana.jpg)

Juvénal Habyarimana (1937 – 1994) was the third President of the Republic of Rwanda from 1973 until 1994. During his rule he favored his own ethnic group, the Hutus, and supported the Hutu majority in neighboring Burundi against the Tutsi government. On April 6 1994, he was killed when his airplane, also carrying the President of Burundi, Cyprien Ntaryamira, was shot down close to Kigali International Airport. His assassination ignited ethnic tensions in the region and helped spark the Rwandan Genocide.

See Wikipedia: Juvénal Habyarimana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juvenal_Habyarimana)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:07:19 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Yh8bpY8Q2QY/TzcK2UrV68I/AAAAAAAAF4I/VV86usTuJLg/s512/Leopold%2520Sedar%2520Senghor.jpg)

Léopold Sédar Senghor (1906 – 2001) was a Senegalese poet, politician, and cultural theorist who for two decades served as the first president of Senegal (1960–1980). Senghor was the first African elected as a member of the Académie française. Before independence, he founded the political party called the Senegalese Democratic Bloc. He is regarded by many as one of the most important African intellectuals of the 20th century.

See Wikipedia: Léopold Sédar Senghor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9opold_S%C3%A9dar_Senghor)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-go_pX7LHNsY/Tzmp1oYdWGI/AAAAAAAAF_k/e63Cr0YbXPo/s700/Senegal%252050fr%25201975.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:07:35 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-c2FRXVxdbUc/TzhAnxtBLsI/AAAAAAAAF8c/7VhhQQbzUXg/s300/Mancham.jpg)

Sir James Richard Marie Mancham KBE (born 1939) was the first President of the Seychelles from 1976 to 1977. When Britain announced its intention to give independence to the colony, Mancham founded the Democratic Party (S.D.P.), and served as its leader until February 2005. France-Albert René founded an opposition party, the Seychelles People's United Party (S.P.U.P) with the support of the Soviet Union. As Chief Minister of the colony, Mancham promoted tourism to the Seychelles and arranged for the building of the airport that was to make the Seychelles accessible to the rest of the world. Tourism increased and the economy developed. In 1976, Mancham won the popular vote when the British gave the Seychelles independence. Less than a year later, in June 1977, he was deposed in a coup by Prime Minister France-Albert René, who had the support of Tanzanian-trained revolutionaries and Tanzanian-supplied weapons, whilst Mancham was attending the Commonwealth Heads of Government Conference in London.

Mancham lived in exile in London until April 1992. When he returned to the Seychelles following the lifting of the ban on opposition, he resumed the promotion of tourism to the tropical islands. He ran for president in July 1993 and finished second behind René. In March 1998 he ran again, receiving third place, behind René and Wavel Ramkalawan.

See Wikipedia: James Mancham (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Mancham)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9511.0;attach=13168;image)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:07:49 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-qz8USRRo0LA/TzfK-CvfcPI/AAAAAAAAF4k/6eJ7xywIOzk/s190/Milton%2520Margai.jpg)

Sir Milton Augustus Strieby Margai (December 7, 1895 - April 28, 1964) was a Sierra Leonean politician and the first prime minister of Sierra Leone. He
was the main architect of the post-colonial constitution of Sierra Leone and guided his nation to independence in 1961. Margai died in office in Freetown in 1964 and was succeeded as prime minister by his brother Albert Margai.

See Wikipedia: Milton Margai (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Margai)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=82098;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:08:04 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3-RR_pHSa-c/TzfUK2i0cNI/AAAAAAAAF5E/ZeHjCm4l9RQ/s200/Siaka%2520Stevens-.jpg)

Siaka Probyn Stevens (1905 – 1988) was the 3rd prime minister of Sierra Leone from 1967–1971 and the 1st president of Sierra Leone from 1971–1985. Stevens is generally criticised for dictatorial methods of government in which many of his political opponents were executed, as well as for mismanaging the economy. On a positive note, he reduced the ethnic polarisation in the government of Sierra Leone by incorporating members of various ethnic groups into the government.

In April 1971, Stevens made Sierra Leone a republic and he became the first President of Sierra Leone a day after the constitution had been ratified by the Parliament of Sierra Leone. Stevens retired from office at the end of his term on 28 November 1985. After pressuring all other potential successors to step aside, he chose Major-General Joseph Saidu Momoh, the commander of the Sierra Leone Armed Forces as his successor. Stevens died on 29 May 1988 in Freetown.

See Wikipedia: Siaka Stevens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siaka_Stevens)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4458.0;attach=78793;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:08:19 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-OaEd0LXiyuU/TzfUK0J4WQI/AAAAAAAAF48/sQMzMVteKTs/s221/Joseph%2520Momoh.jpg)

Major General Joseph Saidu Momoh (1937 – 2003) was the President of Sierra Leone from November 1985 to April 1992. He was overthrown in a military coup staged by Valentine Strasser, a 25-year-old army captain, in April 1992. Strasser's cabinet members were young lieutenants and captains in their 20s. Momoh spent the last years of his life as a guest of the military government in neighboring Guinea, where he died in exile in 2003.

See Wikipedia: Joseph Saidu Momoh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Saidu_Momoh)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=78794;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 08:08:33 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-EoFkp6ioh-w/TzmvtKmpfiI/AAAAAAAAGAE/A67BhvE5_Hg/s480/President%2520Aden%2520Abdulle%2520Osman.jpg)

Aden Abdulle Osman Daar (1908 – 2007), popularly known as Aadan Cadde, was a Somali politician and the country's first President from July 1, 1960 to June 10, 1967. In the 1967 presidential election, Daar was defeated by Abdirashid Ali Shermarke, his former Prime Minister. His term as president ended on June 10, 1967. Daar accepted the loss graciously, making history as the first leader in Africa to peacefully hand over power to a democratically elected successor. He died in hospital on June 8, 2007, at the age of 99.

See Wikipedia: Aden Abdullah Osman Daar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aden_Abdullah_Osman_Daar)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-bw8Ssr9IA54/TzmvtOJlxEI/AAAAAAAAGAI/cjut1wA-3ic/s686/Somalia%2520500s%25201965.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:00:14 PM
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-M76nH9GmT1k/TzrLEt_f0iI/AAAAAAAAGEs/2zXCHO649QQ/s300/President-Thomas-Francois-Burgers.jpg)

Thomas François Burgers (born 1834, died 1881) was the 4th president of the South African Republic, informally known as the Transvaal Republic, from 1871 to 1877. He was born in Graaff Reinet, Cape Colony. After studying theology at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, Burgers became the parson of Hanover, South Africa, in 1859. A charmingly eloquent, but fiercely individualistic man, he had been influenced by Professor C. W. Opzoomer in the Netherlands and embraced his rationalist, liberal ideas.

Burgers quickly became involved in a stormy controversy with the Dutch Reformed Synod over his alleged liberalism and disbelief in the literal truth of the Bible. He was critical of traditional culture and strongly emphasised knowledge and rationalism. In 1862, his unorthodox doctrine brought on him an accusation of heresy, and in 1864 he was found guilty by the Synod and suspended. The Supreme Court overturned the decision, and in 1865, he was readmitted to the ministry.

The burghers of the South African Republic urged Burgers to stand for the presidency, and he was elected by the considerable majority of 2,964 to 388 in 1871. The South African Republic's first coins—the famous Burgerspond—was introduced in 1874. These were struck at Heaton's Mint in Birmingham, England when he was there on a visit.

By 1877 Burgers was very unpopular and his government was insolvent. Britain, keen on expanding their empire, stepped in and annexed the Transvaal. Burgers retired from political life, settled in the Cape Colony again, and died in 1881, only forty-seven years old, and leaving his family destitute.
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:02:17 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-E3Sfad9l-qI/TzrLEqMppTI/AAAAAAAAGEo/wf9ApXvI9U0/s280/Paul%2520Kruger.jpg)

Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger (10 October 1825 – 14 July 1904), better known as Paul Kruger and affectionately known as Uncle Paul (Afrikaans: "Oom Paul") was State President of the South African Republic (Transvaal). He gained international renown as the face of Boer resistance against the British during the South African or Second Boer War (1899–1902).

What is interesting is that Kruger was of mixed race. When I mentioned this to a South African friend in the 1980s, he became furious and denied it. Apparently the Apartheid regime had "Aryanised" Kruger. He appears on South Africa's bullion coins, the Krugerrand, to this day.

See Wikipedia: Paul Kruger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Kruger)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=12529.0;attach=73178;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13348.0;attach=73199;image)
 
 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:03:15 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-HhCZn6UnMjk/Tzf1vd7ma7I/AAAAAAAAF6I/Lv-mR8fH49c/s329/Mandela.jpg)

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, born 18 July 1918, served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999, and was the first South African president to be elected in a fully representative democratic election. Before his presidency, Mandela was an anti-apartheid activist, and the leader of Umkhonto we Sizwe, the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). In 1962 he was arrested and convicted of sabotage and other charges, and sentenced to life in prison. Mandela served 27 years in prison, spending many of these years on Robben Island. Following his release from prison on 11 February 1990, Mandela led his party in the negotiations that led to multi-racial democracy in 1994. As president from 1994 to 1999, he frequently gave priority to reconciliation. Mandela has received more than 250 awards over four decades, including the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize.

See Wikipedia: Nelson Mandela (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson_Mandela)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:03:35 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-FjqFYJP3iIA/Tzf4EVKK9LI/AAAAAAAAF6Q/-zN9GGIHj8I/s204/King%2520Sobhuza%2520II.png)

Sobhuza succeeded Ngwane V as Paramount Chief of Swaziland on December 10, 1899, when he was only a few months old. His grandmother, Labotsibeni Mdluli, acted as regent until December 22, 1921. His nominal reign of 82 years, 9 months is the longest precisely dated monarchical reign on record and the longest documented reign of any monarch since antiquity.

Sobhuza's personal reign of over 60 years (1921–82) saw Swaziland's independence from Great Britain in 1968, after which he was styled King of Swaziland. When the kingdom became independent, it was considered possible that the existing tribal government could be modified into a constitutional monarchy. This existed for some time, until April 12, 1973, when he repealed the constitution and dissolved parliament, making himself absolute ruler. In the early 1980s Sobhuza attempted to gain control over KaNgwane, a Bantustan set up by the South African apartheid government.

Sobhuza died in 1982, having appointed Prince Sozisa Dlamini to serve as 'Authorized Person', advising a regent after his death. The first regent was Queen Dzeliwe, but after a power struggle Sozisa deposed her and replaced her by Queen Ntombi, while at the same time Ntombi and Sobhuza's young son Mswati was designated as Crown Prince. Mswati was crowned as king in 1986.

See Wikipedia: Sobhuza II (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sobhuza_II)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9511.0;attach=13161;image)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-fiT-dylu_jA/TzmqmLZibkI/AAAAAAAAF_s/jWFzaxpIhrI/s613/Swaziland.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:03:52 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-gkpysn0rezA/Tzgi-4KdqXI/AAAAAAAAF6w/NWwcC4I9HXg/s434/King%2520Mswati%2520III.jpg)

Mswati III (born Makhosetive Dlamini in 1968) is the King of Swaziland and head of the Swazi Royal Family. In 1986, he succeeded his father Sobhuza II as ruler of the southern African kingdom. He is generally considered to be one of the last absolute monarchs in the world, as he has the authority to appoint the country's Prime Minister, members of the cabinet, and the judiciary.

See Wikipedia: Mswati III (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mswati_III)



Ntombi (born c. 1950) has been the Indlovukazi (Great She-Elephant) and Joint Head of State of Swaziland since 1986. She was also regent of Swaziland from 1983 to 1986. She was born Ntombi laTwala. She is the mother of King Mswati III.

See Wikipedia: Ntombi of Swaziland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ntombi_of_Swaziland)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-l0DXtQRLPQU/TzgfyPynwDI/AAAAAAAAF6g/h9g8kU2YDOs/s529/Swaziland%25201%2520lilangeni%25201986.jpg)

The young Mswati (obverse) and Ntombi (reverse).



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-fV6PfA1YACU/TzgfyBAZDqI/AAAAAAAAF6Y/dbOlf5GLp5A/s328/Swaziland%25202%2520emalangeni%25202003.jpg)

King Mswati III.
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:04:08 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-aTNvo3YNXh8/TzgraLgBUgI/AAAAAAAAF64/9xpFQhT4jX0/s347/Nyerere.jpg)

Julius Kambarage Nyerere (1922 – 1999) served as the first President of Tanzania and prior to that of Tanganyika, from the country's founding in 1961 until his retirement in 1985. In 1961 Tanganyika was granted self governance and Nyerere became its first Prime Minister on 9 December 1961. A year later he was elected President of Tanganyika when it became a republic. He was instrumental in the union between the islands of Zanzibar and the mainland Tanganyika to form Tanzania, after the Zanzibar revolution on 12 January 1964 which toppled the Sultan of Zanzibar Jamshid bin Abdullah. The coup leader, a stonemason from Lira, Uganda, named John Okello, had intended Zanzibar to join Kenya. Nyerere, unnerved by the Tanganyika Army mutiny a few days later, ensured that Okello was barred from returning to Zanzibar after a visit to the mainland.

From the mid 1970s on he was one of the leaders of the Front Line States which campaigned in support of black majority rule in southern Africa. In 1978 he led Tanzania in war with Uganda, defeating and exiling the government of Idi Amin. Nyerere was instrumental in the 1977 coup in Seychelles which brought France-Albert René to power.

Nyerere died in a London hospital of leukaemia on 14 October 1999.

See Wikipedia: Julius Nyerere (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Nyerere)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-TXK5w2RrNQ8/TzgrabUinpI/AAAAAAAAF7E/Q25iN5Srg4Q/s365/Tanzania%2520100s%25201994.jpg)



(http://hhttp://i975.photobucket.com/albums/ae231/octoid/Tan5a_zpsce01addb.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:04:22 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-C67qi9i0vL4/TzgraA0I95I/AAAAAAAAF68/AsDaMfaGJT4/s220/Mwinyi.jpg)

Ali Hassan Mwinyi (born 1925) is a Tanzanian politician. He was the second President of the United Republic of Tanzania from 1985 to 1995.

See Wikipedia: Ali Hassan Mwinyi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Hassan_Mwinyi)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-gSQvEG-SRQE/Tzgravwpb8I/AAAAAAAAF7Q/MTLpzYju1E4/s362/Tanzania%252020s%25201992.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:04:37 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-J1NvSSdtPHM/TzgraL3V6OI/AAAAAAAAF7A/Slrfe6fermg/s301/Sheikh%2520Abeid%2520Kmani%2520Karume.jpg)

Sheikh Abeid Amani Karume (1905 – 1972), was the first President of Zanzibar. He obtained this title as a result of a popular revolution which led to the deposing of the last Sultan in Zanzibar in January 1964. Three months later, the United Republic of Tanzania was founded as Tanzania, prompting Karume to become the first Vice President of the United Republic along with Julius Nyerere of Tanganyika as president. He was the father of Zanzibar's former president – Amani Abeid Karume.

Karume was assassinated in April 1972 in Zanzibar Town. Amani Abeid Karume, Sheikh Abeid's son, was twice elected president of Zanzibar, in 2000 and 2005 by a popular majority and handed over power in late 2010 to his successor Ali Mohamed Shein.

See Wikipedia: Abeid Karume (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abeid_Karume)



(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-AtyModcH3sE/TzgraqGtZwI/AAAAAAAAF7I/VbHkb82G4Z4/s361/Tanzania%2520200s%25201998.jpg)
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:04:51 PM
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-DXvPnrf9N3A/Tzg0V7kOjQI/AAAAAAAAF7s/Gb_a2XiRRf0/s384/Gnassingbe%2520Eyadema.jpg)

General Gnassingbé Eyadéma (born Étienne Eyadéma, 1937) was the President of Togo from 1967 until his death in 2005. He participated in two successful military coups, in January 1963 and January 1967, and became President on April 14, 1967. As President, he created a political party, the Rally of the Togolese People (RPT), and headed a single-party regime until the early 1990s, when reforms leading to multiparty elections began. Although his power was seriously challenged by the events of the early 1990s, he ultimately consolidated power again and won multiparty presidential elections in 1993, 1998, and 2003; the opposition boycotted the 1993 election and denounced the 1998 and 2003 election results as fraudulent. At the time of his death, Eyadéma was the longest-serving ruler in Africa.

On 5th February 2005 Eyadéma died in a plane, 250 km south of Tunis, Tunisia. He died "as he was being evacuated for emergency treatment abroad", according to a government statement. Officials have stated that the cause of death was a heart attack. At the time of his death he was the longest-serving head of state in Africa.

See Wikipedia: Gnassingbé Eyadéma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnassingb%C3%A9_Eyad%C3%A9ma)



(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-6pLj3_4DKjI/TzmoN4XkVWI/AAAAAAAAF_c/HRLj-Hn_yRM/s515/Togo%252010%252C000fr%25201977.jpg)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=79949;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:05:05 PM
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NqjW4KwxlCg/TzmtWKWFbQI/AAAAAAAAF_4/dtwUKObKCU0/s350/Idi%2520Amin.jpg)

Idi Amin Dada (c. 1925 – 2003) was a military leader and the third President of Uganda from 1971 to 1979. Amin joined the British colonial regiment, the King's African Rifles in 1946. Eventually he held the rank of Major General in the post-colonial Ugandan Army and became its Commander before seizing power in the military coup of January 1971, deposing Milton Obote. He later promoted himself to Field Marshal while he was the head of state.

Amin's rule was characterized by gross human rights abuse, political repression, ethnic persecution, extrajudicial killings, nepotism, corruption, and gross economic mismanagement. During his years in power, Amin shifted in allegiance from being a pro-Western ruler enjoying considerable Israeli support to being later backed by Libya's Muammar al-Gaddafi as well as the Soviet Union and East Germany.

In 1975–1976, Amin became the Chairman of the Organisation of African Unity, a pan-Africanist group designed to promote solidarity of the African states. During the 1977–1979 period, Uganda was appointed to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. In 1977, after the last two British diplomats withdrew from Uganda, Amin declared he had beaten the British and added "CBE", for "Conqueror of the British Empire", to his title. Dissent within Uganda and Amin's attempt to annex the Kagera province of Tanzania in 1978 led to the Uganda–Tanzania War and the demise of his regime. Amin later fled to exile in Libya and Saudi Arabia until his death on 16 August 2003.

See Wikipedia: Idi Amin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idi_Amin)



(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-xDv_4sfCXto/TzmtWOo4lSI/AAAAAAAAF_0/piCg1qvGGQ0/s559/Uganda%2520%25C2%25A31%25201975.jpg)

This piece is listed as one pound, 1975. Amin ordered a few pieces only to be struck, presumably to satisfy his vanity.
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:05:20 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-mDwtlyutM60/Tzg22MrYFII/AAAAAAAAF70/3-ol0LQvQHk/s286/Milton%2520Obote.jpg)

Apolo Milton Obote (1925 – 2005) was a Ugandan political leader who led Uganda towards independence from the British colonial administration in 1962. Following the nation's independence, he served as Prime Minister of Uganda from 1962 to 1966 and President of Uganda from 1966 to 1971, then again from 1980 to 1985. He was overthrown by Idi Amin in 1971, but regained power after Amin's 1979 overthrow. His second rule was marred by repression and the deaths of many civilians as a result of a civil war known as the Ugandan Bush War.

On 27 July 1985, Obote was deposed again. As in 1971, he was overthrown by his own army commanders in a military coup d'état. Obote fled to Tanzania and later to Zambia. On October 10th 2005, Obote died of kidney failure in a hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.

See Wikipedia: Milton Obote (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Obote)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39617.0;attach=78795;image)

 
Title: Re: Portraits of African Leaders
Post by: <k> on February 14, 2012, 10:05:36 PM
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-fwkUmlZNZK4/Tzg46N4ouZI/AAAAAAAAF78/mmV8uwBbbiQ/s450/Kaunda.jpg)

Kenneth David Kaunda (born 1924) served as the first President of Zambia, from 1964 to 1991. His close friend Julius Nyerere stepped down from the republican presidency in Tanzania in 1985 and encouraged Kaunda to follow suit. Pressure for a return to multiparty politics increased and Kaunda voluntarily yielded and called for multiparty elections in 1991, in which the Movement for Multiparty Democracy (MMD) won. Kaunda left office with the inauguration of MMD leader Frederick Chiluba as president on November 2, 1991. He was the second mainland African head of state to allow free multiparty elections and to have relinquished power when he lost: the first, Mathieu Kérékou of Benin, had done so in March of that year.

Chiluba later attempted to deport Kaunda on the grounds that he was a Malawian. The MMD dominated government barred citizens with foreign parentage from standing for the presidency, to prevent Kaunda from contesting the elections in 1996, and Kaunda retired from politics after he was accused of involvement in a failed 1997 coup attempt. In 1999 Kaunda was declared stateless by the Ndola High Court, but he successfully challenged this decision in the Supreme Court of Zambia, which declared him to be a Zambian citizen in the year 2000.

Since retiring he has been involved in various charitable organizations. The current President of Zambia Michael Sata, a protege of Kenneth Kaunda, has been making use of the former leader as a roving ambassador for Zambia.

See Wikipedia: Kenneth Kaunda (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_Kaunda)



(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-nA-uvUacINU/Tzg46ICu3TI/AAAAAAAAF8A/YzLf5lZB-bk/s577/Zambia%25202s%25201966.JPG)