World of Coins

Design and designing => Thematic collecting => Topic started by: <k> on January 21, 2012, 04:40:17 PM

Title: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 21, 2012, 04:40:17 PM
Independence: a tricky theme, because it is an abstract concept. Out of all the history and culture of your country, how do you choose a subject that projects this theme to the world and to your own people?

Mauritius received its independence from the British in 1968. In 1971 it chose to issue a 10 rupees coin to celebrate this. The reverse of the coin depicted a dodo on the reverse, an extinct flightless bird of Mauritius that has become one of the country's emblems. Was this a good omen or a bad one? Will Mauritius also become extinct when the oceans rise?  :-\



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=21492.0;attach=80417;image)

 

Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 21, 2012, 04:48:00 PM
Rwanda, 200 francs, 1972: 10th Anniversary of Independence. Two men shake hands in front of the Rwandan flag.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4458.0;attach=78806;image)

 
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 21, 2012, 05:01:06 PM
Depending on your political outlook, the Netherlands achieved independence somewhere between 1568 and 1648. At the time, it was known as the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands, or simply "the Republic", since there weren't any others (Venice claimed to be, but it did appoint a feudal type ruler.) It was one of the first times in history that a people succeeded in fighting off their feudal ruler without getting a new one instead, but it was a process, not an occasion. Most historians put the date of independence at 1579, since in that year, the seven autonomous parts agreed to a federation. The pact is known as the Union of Utrecht. It is also often considered to be the country's first constitution.

The coin celebrating independence does not mention the word, since other dates could also be said to be the date of independence. Its design is arguably the worst since independence.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 21, 2012, 05:27:24 PM
That's a difficult one. Who did the UK become independent FROM? Or should we include establishment of a state here, as well as independence?

I suppose the Act of Union of 1707, which officially united England and Scotland, would be the best date for the establishment of the UK.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 21, 2012, 05:40:51 PM
I see no difference between independence and establishing a state. As for England, I would argue that it became independent of the Norsemen and Normans at the end of the 100 years war, somewhere between 1428 and 1453 with the loss of Aquitaine. Afterwards, there was no reason for English kings like Richard Lionheart to live in France, unable to speak English. The event is unlikely to be celebrated on a coin, though.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 21, 2012, 06:02:06 PM
For Israel, independence was a traumatic affair. Centuries of persecution, culminating with mass murder in the second world war made jews all over the world come to their ancient homeland. However, that was already taken by Arabs. Independence therefore became the start of what was to become a series of wars and insurrections.

The seven-armed candelabra (menorah) for this piece on 10 years of independence is the symbol of light in the same tradition as Diwali and Christmas. I find the design magnificent. The piece is slightly concave (as on a very similar Irish commemorative for independence), creating an illusion of three dimansions and an attempt to make you forget how round coins are. The value side is ex-centric, yet balanced, sober, yet impressive.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: bart on January 21, 2012, 06:05:24 PM
The independence of Belgium was commemorated in several coins:
- 1 and 2 francs in 1880 (50 years of independence), showing Leopold I and II and only issued in french;
- 10 francs in 1930 (100 years of independence - the piece I have in my collection is quite damaged), showing Leopold I, II and Albert I. This coin was issued both in flemish and french
- 500 francs in 1980 (150 years of independence), showing Leopold I, II, Albert I, Leopold III and Baudouin. This coin was also issued both in flemish and french.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 21, 2012, 08:19:50 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=9141.0;attach=12430;image)

This coin of 1944 commemorates the 5th anniversary of Slovakia's independence in 1939. Slovakia at that time was never really independent, of course, but merely a puppet state of the Nazis. Her "independence" had less than a year to go after the issue of that coin, which now looks so doom-laden. It depicts Jozef Tiso, a Catholic priest and the authoritarian leader of the Slovak People’s Party and of the Slovak state.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 21, 2012, 08:53:51 PM
A commemorative for Pádraig Mac Piarais (Patrick Pearse), the romantic, naive school teacher who lead the Easter rising to its murderous end, becoming an Irish hero in the process. Another hero of a revolution and connected to the Israeli piece shown upthread by its concavity and sparse design.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 21, 2012, 09:13:04 PM
Finnish independence came as an occasion, followed by a long period of being under threat (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,6181.0.html). The coin reflects this, by not having the word independence on it.

I think this is one of the most beautiful coins on independence ever made. On one side, swans suggest all kinds of things, from discipline (formation) to sacrifice (the cruciform) to freedom (flying), while making a connection to the other side with the style of rendering. The other side shows high-rise construction and bridge building, suggesting modernity and political healing.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Prosit on January 21, 2012, 11:28:31 PM
200th Anniversary of US Independance. This is my example of the 1776-1976 US Quarter Dollar.  It is uncirculated.
I like the design.
Dale
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 12:24:40 AM
Albania, 1937, 1 franga ar.  25 years of independence. Oops - has Mussolini seen that?  :-X
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 12:39:10 AM
Surinam, 10 gulden, 1976. First anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 12:42:54 AM
South Korea. 30th Anniversary of Independence, 1975.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 12:53:48 AM
China, 1989, 1 yuan. 40th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 12:58:56 AM
Slovakia, 100 korun, 1993. Independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 01:03:25 AM
Brazil 1922 2000 reis. Centenary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 01:12:28 AM
Slovenia, 3 euro, 2011.  20th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 22, 2012, 01:16:00 AM
This may be the oldest independence commemorative. The series consist of a 1/8, 1/4, 1/2 and 1 real 1812/año secundo de la Republica. The key is the 19 in the centre. This refers to the declaration of independence of 19th April 1810 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Venezuela#The_First_Republic). In 1812, the first republic surrendered to Spain. Lasting independence was achieved only in 1821, after years of bloody warfare.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 22, 2012, 01:26:01 AM
Lithuania, 10 litu, 1938.  20th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Abhay on January 22, 2012, 01:28:56 AM
10 Rupee coin from India, on 25th Anniversary of Independence, issued in 1972.

Abhay
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Abhay on January 22, 2012, 01:33:25 AM
50 Paisa coin from India, on 50th Anniversary of Independence, issued in 1997.

Abhay
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 22, 2012, 01:34:46 AM
The parliament building in the background of the 10 rupees refers to the democratic values inherent in India's independence. It isn't always so. This circulating commemorative 40 shillings for 40 years of Kenyan independence shows the latest inept dictator.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Abhay on January 22, 2012, 01:40:04 AM
The parliament building in the background of the 10 rupees refers to the democratic values inherent in India's independence. It isn't always so. This circulating commemorative 40 shillings for 40 years of Kenyan independence shows the latest inept dictator.

Peter

The statue on the 50 Paisa coin shows the Dandi March yatra. The same was depicted on 500 rupee note (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,9853.0.html) also.

Abhay
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 22, 2012, 01:40:29 AM
Lithuania, 10 litu, 1938.  20th anniversary of independence.

More information on the (feudal) sign here (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,5582.0.html).

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: ciscoins on January 22, 2012, 10:19:39 AM
Kazakhstan, 5 years
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: ciscoins on January 22, 2012, 10:20:13 AM
Tajikistan, 15 years
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: ciscoins on January 22, 2012, 10:20:51 AM
Uzbekistan, 10 years
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 26, 2012, 10:43:39 PM
The Federal Republic of Germany issued two circulating 2 DM coins in 1969 which commemorated the 20th anniversary of the country's existence or independence. Below is the one that shows the first chancellor Konrad Adenauer; the other one shows the first president Theodor Heuss.

Similar 2 DM coins are about the 30th (Kurt Schumacher), 40th (Franz Josef Strauß) and 45th (Willy Brandt) anniversary of the country. The silver coins (5 DM - 25 yrs 1974, 10 DM - 50 yrs 1999) focus on the constitution instead.

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 26, 2012, 10:47:22 PM
The Netherlands will apparently issue a series of coins dedicated to 200 years of the Kingdom. Designs are not known yet, I think.

"In de jaren 2013 - 2015 bestaat ons Koninkrijk 200 jaar. Dit gaan we vieren! In de jaren 1813 - 1815 is het fundament gelegd voor het land dat we in de 200 jaar daarna hebben opgebouwd: Nederland werd een Koninkrijk, met een Grondwet, een Eerste en een Tweede Kamer en een positie op het internationale toneel. Om dit te eren brengt de Koninklijke Nederlandse Munt al vanaf 2012 een mooie serie uit rondom dit thema." http://www.knm.nl/200-jaar-Koninkrijk-der-Nederlanden/nl/news/289/?NieuwsGroepID=1&NWSY=2011&NWSM=12

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 27, 2012, 12:27:54 PM
The German Democratic Republic (GDR, East G.) was founded in October 1949. So in 1969 this circulating commem (see attached image) was issued. Five years later, for the 25th anniversary, two 10 M pieces came out - one in Cu-Ni, one in silver (with different designs). Others were issued in 1979 (30 years, 20 M) and 1989 (40 years, 10 M). One year later the country became history; in 1990 the states of the GDR joined the Federal Republic.

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 27, 2012, 12:43:50 PM
Switzerland is a little more difficult. :) This coin from 1991 (see attachment, image from Wikipedia) commemorates the 700th anniversary of the 1291 Federal Charter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Charter_of_1291) which is considered the nucleus of the country. Another important date with regard to Swiss independence is 1648 when Switzerland, by and large, left the Holy Roman Empire ...

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: paisepagal on January 27, 2012, 12:45:12 PM
Switzerland is a little more difficult. :) This coin from 1991 (see attachment, image from Wikipedia) commemorates the 700th anniversary of the 1291 Federal Charter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Charter_of_1291) which is considered the nucleus of the country. Another important date with regard to Swiss independence is 1648 when Switzerland, by and large, left the Holy Roman Empire ...

Christian

Curious design, what's it supposed to mean ?
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: adam on January 28, 2012, 06:45:17 AM
Curious design, what's it supposed to mean ?

I think it's moving forward Swiss cross.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 28, 2012, 10:39:08 AM
Yes, that's exactly what it is. The two elements are the Swiss cross, appearing four times (thus symbolizing the four language regions as far as I know), and this "motion" which means that 1291 was the starting point of a long process ...

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: paisepagal on January 28, 2012, 10:46:26 AM
Thanks... I understand the forward movement ... And now the 4 arrow heads makes sense.... But maybe I'm missing something ... I can't see a cross per se from any angle ... And do the lines on either end have some meaning too ? The first few point one way ... And then the last few sort of open up
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on January 28, 2012, 11:36:07 AM
Draw an imaginary arrowhead in opposite direction at the second date. Can you see the cross on top now? There are three others behind it. Keep in mind the the four arms of the Swiss cross are the same length. You see the design as two-dimensional, while it is three-dimensional.

The design is difficult to grasp, but once you got it, quite powerful. The crosses are not there, the brain creates them in 3D. The movement, depth and the attempt to make you forget how round the coin is all work together to create a modern and advanced coin design.

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 28, 2012, 11:58:25 AM
Here's my attempt to explain, but I'm no Picasso.  :-[
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: paisepagal on January 28, 2012, 12:01:09 PM
Here's my attempt to explain, but I'm no Picasso.  :-[

Ah ! I was trying to imagine something that was staring me in the face ... Doh!  ;D

Very nice design indeed.. Thats a very incitely way to put an idea across
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 30, 2012, 01:49:42 AM
Israel, 1981, 2 sheqels.  33rd Anniversary of Independence - People of the Book.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13579.0;attach=20021;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13579.0;attach=20022;image)
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: bart on February 04, 2012, 01:36:55 PM
Malta 2 liri 1989 - 25th Anniversary of Independence, showing the effigy of Giorgio Borg Olivier (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Borg_Olivier), who was Prime-Minister at the time of Independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: ciscoins on February 09, 2012, 12:30:25 AM
Sri Lanka, 50 years
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on February 12, 2012, 07:39:09 PM
Austria, 10 euro, 2005.   60th Anniversary of the Republic.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on February 13, 2012, 01:37:57 AM
The symbolism of the broken chain also occurs on the circulation coins of that period, as the eagle is wearing the chain on its legs. Also, the orb and scepter ended up being replaced by quite different ornaments, not seen on this coin :)

Peter
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 13, 2012, 11:36:17 PM
Yes, the broken chain was added after WW2. In the First Republic, the Austrian eagle had one head with a mural crown (symbol of the bourgeoisie), and in its feet a hammer (industrial workers) and a sickle (peasants/farmers). The Austrofascist regime replaced that symbol with a double-headed eagle with empty feet. When Austria was part of Nazi Germany, it used the eagle with the swastika. After WW2, when Austria became independent again, it added the broken chain.

That "post-war eagle" is still the emblem of the republic. However, it has not been used on euro coins, with the exception of one proof-only collector piece in 2003.

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: villa66 on February 14, 2012, 01:11:29 AM
Yes, the broken chain was added after WW2....When Austria was part of Nazi Germany, it used the eagle with the swastika. After WW2, when Austria became independent again, it added the broken chain....

From an unusually frank series of Austrian semi-postals sold during the early postwar, some similar imagery....

 :) v.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 14, 2012, 08:23:38 AM
The "funny" thing about those Austrian anti-nazi stamps is that the Allied Occupation authorities did not allow all of them. This SS style lightning had to be replaced; the stamp (see attachment) could not be issued ...

Christian
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on February 14, 2012, 08:28:20 AM
Here is a piece from Norway (2003) that commemorates the independence centennial. The kingdoms of Norway and Sweden had a personal union; the Swedish king also ruled in Norway. That ended in 1905, and Norway issued six collector coins between 2003 and 2005 on that occasion.

Christian

(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/nmc9/135-474.jpg)
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on August 02, 2013, 09:14:02 PM
Ukraine, 20 hryvnia, 2001.  10th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: davidrj on February 26, 2014, 03:39:51 PM
A powerful image to plea for independence after the Nazi invasion of the Sudetenland (Czechoslovakia), I believe this medal was sold at the New York World fair.

(http://i593.photobucket.com/albums/tt14/microtome/sudetenlandmedal.jpg) (http://s593.photobucket.com/user/microtome/media/sudetenlandmedal.jpg.html)

David
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on March 26, 2014, 03:46:09 PM
Dominican Republic, 1 peso, 1969.  125th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Figleaf on March 26, 2014, 11:03:14 PM
Luxembourg, 175 years of "independence". The coin refers to the treaty of London of 1839 which did mention Luxembourg's independence but did not create it, as it was already independent, albeit under a personal union with the Netherlands. The treaty did transfer half of Luxembourg to Belgium, something hardly worth celebrating. One suspects Luxembourg was rather desperate for an occasion to issue a commemorative.

Peter

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=25327.0;attach=41481;image)
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: Pabitra on March 27, 2014, 02:06:04 PM
One suspects Luxembourg was rather desperate for an occasion to issue a commemorative.

I think, it is the sales guys of the mints, who aggressively coax minor states to issue (now) two commem coins quota to full extent.
Many times, they have no historical occasion but economic reasons will compel them. Proposing issue of a coin to commem 50th ann. of JF Kennedy's assassination by a minor country was the last straw which forced EU to reject such frivolous issue.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: capnbirdseye on March 28, 2014, 09:38:41 PM
Not strictly a coin but it might be of interest, this celebrates the day Maharashtra State split from Bombay in 1960 so perhaps can be considered a type of independance  ;D
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on August 16, 2015, 03:27:01 PM
Lesotho, 15 maloti, 1981.  15th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: dheer on August 18, 2015, 07:42:02 PM
There is India Independence Jubilee Rs 10 Coin, adding image of 50 Paise. Issued in 1972

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-FuEBKhYvWl8/VdNt7az6UjI/AAAAAAAANag/T9frEX4mU7A/s400/1972-IndependenceJubilee-UNC-5-50paise.jpg)

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-6SiSQFvCPzg/VdNt7rv7YpI/AAAAAAAANao/r4OmciU_I40/s400/1972-IndependenceJubilee-UNC-6-50paise.jpg)
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: dheer on August 18, 2015, 07:47:29 PM
A Rs 50 coin was also issued in 1997 by India to commemorate 50 years.

(https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vYHmEaTvIFY/VdNvXAUlvVI/AAAAAAAANbM/kX_G2XD2mmY/s400/1997-50Yrs-Independence-UNC-9.3-Rs50.jpg)

(https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-tTQYxCDRNUs/VdNvXxqh_eI/AAAAAAAANbY/45B5YS4bvEg/s400/1997-50Yrs-Independence-UNC-9.4-Rs50.jpg)
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on October 01, 2015, 11:28:48 PM
Mauritius, 25 rupees, 1978.  The National Assembly Building.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on December 17, 2016, 12:31:50 AM
Lesotho, 5 maloti, 2016.  50th anniversary of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on February 07, 2018, 06:26:10 PM
Brunei, $1000, 1984.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on March 01, 2018, 01:59:47 AM
Sao Tome, 250 dobras, 1977.  Folklore statue.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on March 03, 2018, 08:49:41 PM
Somalia, 50 shillings, 1970.  10th anniversary of independence. What is the vessel that he is holding? Can I see "INCENSE" or similar written on it?
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: eurocoin on March 03, 2018, 09:10:08 PM
What is the vessel that he is holding? Can I see "INCENSE" or similar written on it?

Incenso, which is incense.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on March 03, 2018, 09:46:40 PM
I thought so - an unusual design.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on October 10, 2018, 11:50:56 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=23435.0;attach=85738;image)

Algeria, 200 dinars, 2012.  50 years of independence.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: <k> on January 01, 2019, 01:30:42 PM
Angola, 50 and 100 kwanzas, 2015.  But Angola still uses the colonial language.
Title: Re: Independence on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 01, 2019, 03:35:04 PM
Angola, 50 and 100 kwanzas, 2015.  But Angola still uses the colonial language.

Yes, Portuguese is the official language there. Just as French, English or Spanish are official languages in other countries that used to be colonies. Makes some sense to me, especially in cases like this one where replacing the "European" language with one local language would not work ...

Christian