World of Coins

Modern coins, pseudo coins and trade tokens of other continents => Pacific Islands => Topic started by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:45:35 PM

Title: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:45:35 PM
Is this a star on the New Guinea sixpence?
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 04, 2011, 11:04:49 PM
Yes, the proclamation says 'a representation of the stone head of a native war club in the form of and eight pointed star' on the reverse.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 11:29:47 PM
Yes, the proclamation says 'a representation of the stone head of a native war club in the form of and eight pointed star' on the reverse.

Excellent detail. Is this online? Does it give descriptions for the other designs? The threepence in particular is a puzzle.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 04, 2011, 11:43:31 PM
Yes it has descriptions for all the other designs; From... From Cowrie to Kina by Dr William J D Mira.1986. publ. Spink and Sons. ....A lovely book.

The three pence; 'on the reverse side symmetrically surrounding the hole, a square surmounting a representation of the stone head of a native war club with four points, one point projecting symmetrically from each side of the square and in the margin two inscriptions......'
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 11:52:06 PM
Yes it has descriptions for all the other designs; From... From Cowrie to Kina by Dr William J D Mira.1986. publ. Spink and Sons. ....A lovely book.

The three pence; 'on the reverse side symmetrically surrounding the hole, a square surmounting a representation of the stone head of a native war club with four points, one point projecting symmetrically from each side of the square and in the margin two inscriptions......'

Thank you, this is fascinating. And I thought they were just abstract patterns. Would you have time to do a scan or do the other descriptions? This ought to be recorded.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 12:09:21 AM
Yes I shall do an OCR scan as its a little big as an image.

Perhaps you may want to start a New Guinea thread? It'll be an hour or so before I get to it!
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 12:26:10 AM
Every penny shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, the Imperial Monogram G.R.I, below the hole, and, on either side of the hole, representations of ornamental carvings on native war canoes — and on the reverse side, surrounding the hole, representations of native ornamental carving, and in the margin two inscriptions TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and ONE PENNY together with the year of the coin in figures.



Every threepence shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, the Imperial Monogram G.R.I, below the hole, and the year of the coin across the coin — two figures on either side of the hole — and on the reverse side symmetrically surrounding the hole, a square surmounting a representation of the stone head of a native war club with four points, one point projecting symmetrically from each side of the square and in the margin two inscriptions — TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and THREEPENCE



Every sixpence shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, the Imperial monogram G.R.I, below the hole and the year of the coin across the coin — two figures on either side of the hole — and on the reverse side, symmetrically surrounding the hole, a representation of the stone head of a native war club in the form of an eight-pointed star, and in the margin two inscriptions TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and SIXPENCE



Every shilling shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, two royal sceptres crossed below the hole, a necklet of dogs' teeth entwining the sceptres, a seven-pointed star between the bases of sceptres, and in the margin the inscription GEORGIUS V. D.G. REX ET IND. IMP. and on the reverse side four oblong representations of a native carving extending from the hole, in the form of a Greek cross interspersed by four narrow pointed representations of a native carving and in the margin two inscriptions TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and ONE SHILLING together with the year of the coin in figures.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=6482.0;attach=8655;image)
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 01:08:52 AM
From... From Cowrie to Kina by Dr William J D Mira.1986. publ. Spink and Sons.

Descriptions of the designs and physical data were published in Coinage Proclamations No's 1 and 2, in the New Guinea Gazette and were deemed to have operated from 2 December 1935. The information however, was found to be inaccurate and these two proclamations were rescinded and replaced by the following, Coinage Proclamation No. 3:

ORDINANCE

by the Administrator of the Territory of New Guinea under the Currency Coinage and Tokens Ordinance 1922-1935.

WHEREAS by section fifteen of the Currency Coinage and Tokens Ordinance 1922-1935 it is amongst other things proved that the Administrator may by proclamation determine the dimensions of the design for any Territory coins:
AND WHEREAS by Coinage Proclamation No. 1 and Coinage Proclamation No. 2, each dated the eleventh day of March, One thousand nine hundred and thirty-eight, the Administrator determined the dimensions of and design for each of the Territory coins known as the shilling, the sixpence, the threepence and the penny:
AND WHEREAS it is desirable to revoke the said Proclamations and to issue a Proclamation in Substitution for those Proclamations:
NOW THEREFORE I, Walter Ramsay McNicoll, the Administrator of the Territory of New Guinea, do hereby revoke the said Coinage Proclamation No. 1 and Coinage Proclamation No. 2 and determine that —
1.   Every Territory coin shall be circular, shall have a concentric hole and shall approximate in dimensions to the dimensions specified for coins of the same denomination in the following table:

Denomination of coin.   Diameter of Coin.    Diameter of Hole.  Thickness of coin where not raised or embossed.
       Inches  Inches  Inches
Shilling   .9335   .178   .064
Sixpence   .738   .155   .055
Threepence   .6426   .1385   .0455
Penny   1.068   .1462   .061
2.   Every Shilling and Sixpence shall have a milled edge and every threepence and penny shall have a plain edge.
3.   The designs for the said coins shall be as follows:
(a)   Every shilling shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, two royal sceptres crossed below the hole, a necklet of dogs' teeth entwining the sceptres, a seven-pointed star between
the bases of sceptres, and in the margin the inscription GEORGIUS V. D.G. REX ET IND. IMP. and on the reverse side four oblong representations of a native carving extending from the hole, in the form of a Greek cross interspersed by four narrow pointed representations of a native carving and in the margin two inscriptions TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and ONE SHILLING together with the year of the coin in figures;
(b)   Every sixpence shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, the Imperial monogram G.R.I, below the hole and the year of the coin across the coin — two figures on either side of
the hole —   and on the reverse side, symmetrically surrounding the hole, a representation of the stone head of a native war club in the form of an eight-pointed star, and in the margin two inscriptions TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and SIXPENCE;
(c)   Every threepence shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, the Imperial Monogram G.R.I, below the hole, and the year of the coin across the coin — two figures on either side of
the hole —   and on the reverse side symmetrically surrounding the hole, a square surmounting a representation of the stone head of a native war club with four points, one point projecting symmetrically from each side of the square and in the margin two inscriptions — TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and THREEPENCE; and
(d)   Every penny shall have on the obverse side an Imperial Crown above the hole, the Imperial Monogram G.R.I, below the hole, and, on either side of the hole, representations of ornamental carvings on native war canoes — and on the reverse side, surrounding the hole, representations of native ornamental carving, and in the margin two inscriptions TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA and ONE PENNY together with the year of the coin in figures.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 01:13:23 AM
Marvellous, malj1, thanks. And I thought Mr Kruger-Gray had just been amusing himself with abstract patterns, but it's all meaningful.  8)
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 01:18:42 AM
Mention is also made that striking was further complicated by the death of George V and the Melbourne mint continued using the 1935 punches for the 3d and 6d and 1936 for the 1/- as the mint was unable to change these to Edwardus VIII, for this to be done the dies had to be sent to England.

Malcolm.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 01:20:40 AM
Apparently the dogs' teeth mentioned were used as money in the days before coins were made available.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 01:40:10 AM
These Dansco albums were popular around 1965 as decimalisation approached Australia, and New guinea, in February 1966.

And of course the average collector could not hope to obtain the 1929 issue so these were not entirely punched out.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 01:42:13 AM
And the second page...
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 03:56:32 AM
Apparently the dogs' teeth mentioned were used as money in the days before coins were made available.

Yes a wonderful collection of objects were used as currency before the white man came along. Shells, dog's teeth and boar tusks, [the number of turns increased the value] were a sign of wealth, along with beads, white being the lowest value and red the highest and stone axe heads. The gold lip shell - the Kina - was used in many area of New Guinea until the 1960's. Kina was perpetuated in the currency name of today along with the toea, an arm band, a traditional trade item and 'bride price' payment of Papua.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: villa66 on December 05, 2011, 04:52:31 AM
Good read. Thanks everyone.

 :) v.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Harald on December 05, 2011, 09:05:33 PM
from Opitz's book on "Traditional Moneys"

cheers
--
Harald
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 05, 2011, 10:56:45 PM
These decimal coinage issues of Papua New Guinea taken from circulation.

The common obverse. Turtle 5t; Cuscus 10t; Cassowary 20t.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 06, 2011, 12:21:38 AM
That is one of the very few circulation sets that was designed by the Franklin Mint, who also minted proof and specimen sets, with some circulation coins over the same period.

Here are the descriptions for the set, with the designer, taken from the Franklin M int catalogue, marked as "D:"

1  Toea.  Paradise birdwing butterfly.     D: Herman deRoos.
2  Toea.  Butterfly codfish.                  D: William Shoyer.
5  Toea.  Pitted shell turtle.                 D: William Shoyer.
10 Toea.  Spotted cuscus.                  D: Herman deRoos.
20 Toea.  Dwarf cassowary. (Muruk bird).   D: William Shoyer.
1  Kina.    River and sea crocodiles.        D: William Shoyer.
          Reverse: Stylised emblem of
               Bank of Papua New Guinea.   D: Richard Renninger.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 06, 2011, 12:22:59 AM
From... From Cowrie to Kina by Dr William J D Mira.1986. publ. Spink and Sons.

Descriptions of the designs and physical data of the decimal coinage issues of Papua New Guinea.

THE COINAGE
General Circulation Specie
 Designer:
Various Papua New Guinea artists in collaboration with the Royal Mint, United Kingdom.
Manufacture:
All general circulation coins are struck by the Royal Mint, except the 1975 K1 when the Royal Canberra Mint struck 4,000,000 and the Royal Mint 2,000,000.
Obverse:
1 - 20toea:(t1 - 20)
The official emblem of Papua New Guinea: a Bird of Paradise seated on a Kundu drum.
1 Kina:(K1)
The official crest (logo) of the Bank of Papua New Guinea; a stylised Bird of Paradise.

Reverse and Physical Data:

1 toea: (wan toea: toea ta)
Diameter =  17.65mm. : Weight = 2.07 grams.
Metal = Bronze
The Paradise Birdwing Butterfly — one of the largest and most colourful butterflies in the world, found in the lowland tropical forests of Papua New Guinea.

2 toea: (tu toea : toea rua)
Diameter = 21.72mm. : Weight = 4.15 grams.
Metal = Bronze
The Butterfly Codfish — found in most reefs around Papua New Guinea; it often changes colour to camouflage itself against predators.

5 toea: (faiv toea : toea ima)
Diameter = 19.53mm. : Weight = 2.83 grams. Metal = cupro-nickel
The Plateless Freshwater Turtle is rarely found outside Papua New Guinea, completely aquatic and herbivorous it lives in the rivers and swamps.

10 toea: (ten toea : toea gwauta) Diameter = 23.72mm. : Weight = 5.65 grams. Metal = Cupro-nickel
The Spotted Cuscus — a marsupial found in the grasslands and swamps: hunted for its meat and skin, the fur is often used for decoration.

20 toea: (tupela ten toea : toea ruahiu) Diameter = 28.65mm. : Weight = 11.30 grams. Metal = Cupro-nickel
Bennett's Cassowary — a flightless bird with large muscular legs giving it high speed on the ground. Found in the lowland regions.

1 Kina: (Wan Kina : Kina ta)
Diameter = 33.00mm. : Central Hole = 6.90mm. Weight = 14.52 grams. Metal = Cupro-nickel
Two species of crocodile; on the left, the saltwater species; on the right, the freshwater type. The latter inhabits the inland rivers and swamps.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on March 01, 2012, 11:13:40 AM
The Head Tax Discs.

The Territory of New Guinea Head Tax Discs, all are in aluminium with a diameter of 35mm.
From the beginning of the Australian Mandate period [1921-42] the tax was fixed at 10/-. The government patrol official, having previously advised the village chiefs, went to the native villages to collect the tax from each male villager and handed out these discs as a receipt. This was maintained until the Japanese invasion in 1942 which caused their cessation.

These two discs were seen on eBay recently along with another.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on April 15, 2012, 11:55:41 AM
I notice the penny shown at Reply #6 (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,12670.msg85998.html#msg85998) has the initials ERI of Edward VIII

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=12670.0;attach=72574;image)

 
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: translateltd on April 16, 2012, 11:00:52 AM
From... From Cowrie to Kina by Dr William J D Mira.1986. publ. Spink and Sons.

Descriptions of the designs and physical data of the decimal coinage issues of Papua New Guinea.

THE COINAGE
1 toea: (wan toea: toea ta)
2 toea: (tu toea : toea rua)
5 toea: (faiv toea : toea ima)
10 toea: (ten toea : toea gwauta)
20 toea: (tupela ten toea : toea ruahiu)
1 Kina: (Wan Kina : Kina ta)

I don't have a copy of Mira - does he say what the second language in brackets is?  There's definitely a link with the Polynesian languages, however, distant, with the words for one, two and five (cf. tahi, rua and rima in Maori), though I realise there are also similarities in the broader Melanesian/Malay families too.  "Ten" varies greatly even within the Polynesian group so I can't hook "gwauta" up with anything else at the moment.  "Tupela ten" in Pidgin tickles me ("two-fellow ten").

EDIT: Found it by Googling "gwauta".  Looks to be Motu:  http://www.education.gov.pg/index.php?content=students/secondary





Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on April 16, 2012, 01:07:57 PM
I don't have a copy of Mira - does he say what the second language in brackets is?  There's definitely a link with the Polynesian languages, however, distant, with the words for one, two and five (cf. tahi, rua and rima in Maori), though I realise there are also similarities in the broader Melanesian/Malay families too.  "Ten" varies greatly even within the Polynesian group so I can't hook "gwauta" up with anything else at the moment.  "Tupela ten" in Pidgin tickles me ("two-fellow ten").

EDIT: Found it by Googling "gwauta".  Looks to be Motu:  http://www.education.gov.pg/index.php?content=students/secondary

this paragraph ibid. confirms that and adds a little more.

…….Mr Chan added: "I therefore propose that the name of the dollar equivalent should be Kina, and the name of the cent equivalent should be toea. The word Kina is found in both the Pidgin and Kuanua languages. In pidgin it refers to the valuable pearl shell used widely in the Highlands as a traditional store of wealth. It is probably the source of one of the terms for pearl shell in the Mount Hagen Melpa language, Kin. The fact that this shell is traded into the Highlands from coastal areas far afield makes it an appropriate national name for one of the basic units of our new currency.
"The word toea is a Motu word meaning valuable arm-shell. The toea has had a wide traditional use in coastal Papua for trading and bride-price payments. One bride-price recorded about 70 years ago consisted of 43 toea, three pigs and 100 dogs' teeth. I am not sure whether there has been inflation or deflation since then. The combination of these two names should help to preserve a valuable part of our cultural traditions, drawn from as broad a spectrum as possible of the whole of Papua New Guinea." .....



Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Harald on April 18, 2012, 10:04:24 PM
"Tupela ten" in Pidgin tickles me ("two-fellow ten").

Usually twenty is quoted as "twenti" in Tok Pisin (the PNG Pidgin), maybe there are several expressions for it.
All creolic languages are extremely diverse (and flexible).

The other "language" given is probably a mix of various languages. PNG counts about 1'000 of them which
belong to 10 or so language families, some of them are not even related to one another. None of these
languages is used across the entire island and could go as a national language. BTW, as I have read English
and Tok Pisin are not understood outside the few centres either. So, it must be difficult to establish a centralised communication (from the  government, for instance).

The numerals that exhibit similarities to the Melanesian familiy ("rua") are doubtful as the the languages spoken
on PNG do not belong there. Probably in the coastal regions or the islands there are Melanesians, too.

cheers
--
Harald
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: translateltd on April 19, 2012, 07:22:58 AM

The numerals that exhibit similarities to the Melanesian familiy ("rua") are doubtful as the the languages spoken
on PNG do not belong there. Probably in the coastal regions or the islands there are Melanesians, too.


Thanks, Harald - that's why I thought it a little unusual.  When I looked at a listing of numbers in Motu it was interesting that not all were Poly/Melanesian - "eight" for instance looked like "two fours", and "nine" "two fours one".

As an aside, a colleague once went on a course to learn one of the "pidgin" languages (I forget now if it was Tok Pisin or Bislama) and said one day that her instructor had been to a remote island (somewhere in PNG/Vanuatu) and had "discovered" a language that was unrelated to anything else.  I don't know exactly where or what the language was, but all the words in the list she brought back were recognisably Polynesian, even based on my only superficial acquaintance with Maori at the time.  It could even have been Motu - certainly not "unrelated to anything", in any case!
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Harald on April 20, 2012, 10:31:14 AM
Here is what Ethnologue says about PNG: http://www.ethnologue.com/show_country.asp?name=PG

Apparently 20% of the languages (or speakers) are Austronesian, the rest are Papua.

cheers
--
Harald
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on July 20, 2012, 08:36:26 AM
At present on eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vintage-New-Guinea-Mount-Hagen-Primitive-Currency-Stone-Axe-1-/170868756559?pt=AU_Ethnographic_Antiques&hash=item27c892504f) there are some nice currency axes. see his other items too.

A nice Mount Hagen currency axe. Carried by warriors and used in trade and "Bride Price" ceremonies. Collected in the early 1970's. Axe measures 64 x 53 cm. Blade measures 10 x 24 cm.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Prosit on July 20, 2012, 04:59:57 PM
I have:
New Caledonia
New Foundland
New Zealand

That is all the "NEW" I have.
No New Guinea
No New Hebrides

Any other "New" Coins out there?

Dale
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on July 20, 2012, 05:32:56 PM

Any other "New" Coins out there?

Dale

Post First World War, none I can think of, but probably the German Empire had a few states beginning with "New". But Newfoundland is all one word - just so we don't confuse any surfers.  ;)
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Prosit on July 20, 2012, 08:12:46 PM
I forgot!  I also have a coin from New Brunswick.
I can't think of any German or Itallian States that started with "New".

Dale

Post First World War, none I can think of, but probably the German Empire had a few states beginning with "New". But Newfoundland is all one word - just so we don't confuse any surfers.  ;)
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on July 21, 2012, 12:56:30 AM
Tabu is the traditional shell money used in East New Britain by the Tolai community. More information here (http://www.michie.net/pnginfo/monidoba.html)



I also read there that the 1 and 2 toea coins were discontinued in 2007 and are no longer legal tender - most have now been returned to the bank.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: translateltd on August 21, 2012, 07:26:24 AM
I forgot!  I also have a coin from New Brunswick.
I can't think of any German or Itallian States that started with "New".

Dale

You could extend the frame a little to cover 18th-century US coins from New Jersey, tokens from New York ... and north of the border  there's Nova Scotia, too, which essentially means the same thing as New Caledonia :-)
Plus English coins and tokens made in Newcastle ...

Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 15, 2012, 06:16:18 AM
50 Toea issued to commemorate the 35th Anniversary of Bank of Papua New Guinea 1973 - 2008
Title: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Bimat on December 15, 2012, 09:09:20 AM
And a bimetallic 2 Kina coin commemorating the same event. Heaviest and biggest bimetallic coin in my collection. :) And for the same reasons, I'm pretty sure it wasn't intended for circulation.

Aditya

 
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Mackie on December 15, 2012, 09:12:53 AM
PAPUA NEW GUINEA - 1 KINA

Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Figleaf on December 15, 2012, 03:17:18 PM
The dog teeth and the crocs go very well with your latest avatar, Mackie :) That avatar in turn strongly reminds me of a vice-minister I had to work for... :'(

Peter
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Mackie on December 15, 2012, 07:39:20 PM
Peter,

My avatar reminds me of my CFO, he doesn't smoke at work but he has the same expression on his face all the time.  ;D
Title: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Bimat on December 22, 2012, 05:51:56 PM
50 Toea (2007): 50th Anniversary of  Saint John Ambulance.

(http://en.numista.com/catalogue/photos/papouasie-nouvelle-guinee/g58.jpg)(http://en.numista.com/catalogue/photos/papouasie-nouvelle-guinee/g57.jpg)

(Image from Numista)

Aditya
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Figleaf on January 07, 2013, 04:36:01 PM
For the sake of completeness.

If you look very carefully, you can see why I got this coin for a fraction of its catalogue quote.

Peter
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: translateltd on January 07, 2013, 09:55:27 PM
Too small for me to see clearly - please explain!  (Does it say "COPY" in small letters somewhere, or has it had a brooch mounting removed?  There is something by the NE of NEU that looks odd - solder marks?)

Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: Figleaf on January 08, 2013, 12:30:10 AM
You almost got it. The spot at NE is the counterpart of a small round punch on the throat and lower part of the head of the bird. Once you have seen it, you wonder why you didn't see it before. Take into account that the picture is three times the size of the coin. You hardly notice the damage with the coin in hand, unless you hold it exactly right in the light.

Peter
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on January 08, 2013, 12:38:56 AM
I had noticed the mark on the reverse but still can't see it on the obverse. Nonetheless it would have commanded a high price in Australia. These are very difficult to obtain unless you have bottomless wallet.

Always hoping!  ;D
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 26, 2014, 06:33:02 PM
New Guinea, ½d and 1d, 1929.  Look at the ornate designs on these old coins.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: davidrj on December 26, 2014, 09:00:35 PM
Does anyone know if the German New Guinea coins actually circulated?

There is a gap in my "bronze penny" collection, namely the 1894 10 pfennig - these are always expensive and top grade - I've never actually seen a worn one offered for sale.

David
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on December 26, 2014, 09:22:49 PM
Does anyone know if the German New Guinea coins actually circulated?

There is a gap in my "bronze penny" collection, namely the 1894 10 pfennig - these are always expensive and top grade - I've never actually seen a worn one offered for sale.

David

Gerhard Schφn's catalogue prices it in four grades, along with the others, which implies that it did circulate. Presumably any wildlife theme collector seeking the most affordable bird of paradise design would go for a circulated 10 pfennig.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 26, 2014, 09:50:45 PM
The German New Guinea coins and banknotes are all quite scarce and are keenly sought after by Australian collectors; this keeps the price high. They would only have has a limited circulation as German New Guinea fell to Australian forces following the outbreak of the First World War.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: davidrj on December 27, 2014, 12:19:32 AM
20 years circulation in the tropics should have left some pretty ropey specimens - where are they?

David
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: andyg on December 27, 2014, 12:40:28 AM
Only good examples here,
http://www.ma-shops.co.uk/shops/maCategory.php5?catid=140&catName=German+New+Guinea&lang=en&sortby=preis_eur (http://www.ma-shops.co.uk/shops/maCategory.php5?catid=140&catName=German+New+Guinea&lang=en&sortby=preis_eur)
Plenty of them, but no worn ones....
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 27, 2014, 01:12:42 AM
The bronze coinage was not well accepted. Minted value of the bronze was 20,000 marks with 2000 marks being brought to the colony in 1895. Virtually all the remainder was melted down; 13,000 Marks in 1900 and 3068 Marks in 1904. Australia occupied the German Colonies in September 1914 allowing the coinage to circulate briefly alongside Australian coinage. The currency was to be replaced with Australian coinage by the time the first force left in January 1915. The proclamation was dated March 11 1916 made absolute in 1920 by another.

The German coinage was shipped to Australia. Silver weighing some 106,873,05 ounces of .900 fine silver were refined and converted into Australian coinage in 1921.

So I make this about ten years circulation at most!  ???
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: davidrj on December 27, 2014, 11:51:43 AM
Thanks Malcolm, useful info

 :D

David
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on December 24, 2016, 06:08:08 AM
I came across some of the German New Guinea coins for sale here (http://www.wynyardcoins.com.au/shop/world-coins/german-new-guinea/)

Warning! no doubt the prices will upset some viewers!  ::)
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on August 22, 2017, 03:39:26 AM
The Head Tax Discs.

The Territory of New Guinea Head Tax Discs, all are in aluminium with a diameter of 35mm.
From the beginning of the Australian Mandate period [1921-42] the tax was fixed at 10/-. The government patrol official, having previously advised the village chiefs, went to the native villages to collect the tax from each male villager and handed out these discs as a receipt. This was maintained until the Japanese invasion in 1942 which caused their cessation.

These two discs were seen on eBay recently along with another.

I now have four years of the Head tax tokens all uniface aluminium 35mm.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on November 29, 2017, 10:30:51 AM
Last week saw Noble Sale 116 (http://www.noble.com.au/auctions/lot?lotno=1311&saleno=116&x=0&y=0) where the 1929 New Guinea specimen penny and halfpenny were on offer.

Lot 1462 penny realised AU$700 and Lot 1463 halfpenny realised AU$600

Note.
Australian Government GST (Goods & Services Tax)
A GST of 10% of the buyer's premium will be added to all accounts. That is with a buyer's premium of 17.5% the buyer will be required to pay an additional 1.75% or a total of 19.25% on the hammer price.
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: <k> on November 29, 2017, 10:53:49 AM
Beautiful old coins. Sounds like a bargain.  8)
Title: Re: Coinage of New Guinea
Post by: malj1 on November 29, 2017, 09:33:35 PM
Yes they went very cheaply and no doubt many people have said "I wish I had known!"