World of Coins

Design and designing => Thematic collecting => Topic started by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:25:35 PM

Title: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:25:35 PM
The star that appears on nearly all the pre-decimal coins of Australia looks at first like mere ornamentation, but it has a special significance.

From Wikipedia:

The Commonwealth Star (also known as the Federation Star, the Seven Point Star, or the Star of Federation) is a seven-pointed star symbolising the Federation of Australia which came into force on 1 January 1901.

Six points of the Star represent the six original states of the Commonwealth of Australia, while the seventh point represents the territories and any future states. The original Star had only six points; however, the proclamation in 1905 of the Territory of Papua led to the addition of the seventh point in 1908 to represent it and future territories.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40458.0;attach=76555;image)

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40458.0;attach=76588;image)

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40458.0;attach=76552;image)

 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:25:49 PM
Here you see the Southern Cross constellation on the reverse of the Australian two dollar coin.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4018.0;attach=80019;image)

 
 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:26:25 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=39634.0;attach=74136;image)

Which star is this, on the South African shilling?

 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:27:50 PM
Twelve stars appear on the obverse and reverse of the euro coinage. The number was randomly chosen to symbolise the diversity of Europe’s nations.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=41466.0;attach=79665;image) (http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/images/image8369.gif)


 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:29:30 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=19736.0;attach=78513;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=19736.0;attach=62630;image)

These star-ridden UK fifty pence coins celebrate the EU.

 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:34:17 PM
The Star of David, or Seal of Solomon, appears on lots of coins, some of them unexpected.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=1578.0;attach=1969;image)

Nepal, 500 rupees, 2060.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 04, 2011, 05:38:29 PM
Morocco's coins are rich in stars.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=8952.0;attach=72566;image)

Morocco, 1953, 100 Francs.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 12:02:51 AM
New Zealand prefers traditional five-pointed stars.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=22697.0;attach=72578;image)

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=22697.0;attach=76745;image)

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=40498.0;attach=76739;image)

Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 12:19:58 AM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=12670.0;attach=72576;image)

Is this a star on the New Guinea sixpence?

According to our member malj1:

The proclamation says 'a representation of the stone head of a native war club in the form of and eight pointed star' on the reverse.
From... From Cowrie to Kina by Dr William J D Mira.1986. publ. Spink and Sons. ....A lovely book.

See also: Coinage of New Guinea (http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,12670.0.html)

 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: Figleaf on December 05, 2011, 02:33:15 AM
Which star is this, on the South African shilling?

Since the figure is hope, the star is likely to be the North star (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pole_star), the sailor's hope, as it is a bright star, it can be used for celestial navigation and it is one of the symbols for the virgin Mary (Stella Maris), who, in turn, is also a symbol of hope.

However, if you want to argue that hope refers to the Cape of Good Hope, therefore the star must be the (much fainter) South Star (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigma_Octantis), that's fine with me.

I think the stars on the Irish punt symbolise celestial navigation. There can be little doubt that the Norsemen knew it, but I am not sure if the Irish knew it.

Peter
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on December 05, 2011, 05:34:57 AM
Here is a single coin that shows American coin iconography evolving from what had been its traditional six-pointed star to the five-pointed star of the present day.

 :) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on December 05, 2011, 05:39:17 AM
For fun, a Kennedy half dollar; the multiple meanings of its stars, anyone?

 :) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on December 05, 2011, 09:30:28 AM
Twelve stars appear on the obverse and reverse of the euro coinage. The number was randomly chosen to symbolise the diversity of Europe’s nations.

Not quite randomly. And on the reverses of the three lowest denominations they do not show. But I remember that a couple of years ago some coin dealers tried to sell the "older" euro coins with the argument that, when the euro cash became legal tender, there were twelve euro area member states, and that in the future new stars would be added whenever a new country enters the currency union ... ::)  "The number of stars has nothing to do with the number of Member States. There are twelve stars because the number twelve is traditionally the symbol of perfection, completeness and unity. The flag therefore remains unchanged regardless of EU enlargements." The European flag | European Union (http://europa.eu/abc/symbols/emblem/index_en.htm)

The Stars of Europe are also displayed on the collector coins of some euro countries. Attached is one example; Germany has them on all collector coins even though those pieces are pretty much the contrary of common currency money ...

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on December 05, 2011, 09:39:43 AM
For fun, a Kennedy half dollar; the multiple meanings of its stars, anyone?

The fairly obvious one is fifty stars representing fifty states. But maybe each star represents a value of 1 cent too? ;)

By the way, while the number of the "Stars of Europe" is fixed, the Swiss stars refer to the number of cantons. That is why the number of stars went up from 22 to 23 in the early 1980s, after Jura became a "full" canton:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/1SwissFranc2001.jpg)

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: izotz on December 05, 2011, 10:30:53 AM
Bolivia usually depicts stars in his coins and / or in his coat of arms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Bolivia), one for each "Department" (Departamentos).

KM160 1 Boliviano
(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/nmc2/24-160.jpg)

In Spanish old coins, you could tell some of the mintmarks depending on the number of points of the stars. Later, on Franco and Juan Carlos I pesetas, it was used to include the year when the coin had been minted on the reverse, while the year on the obverse stated the year when the design had been approved :
(http://worldcoingallery.com/countries/img9/164-788.jpg)
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 03:25:12 PM
Here is a single coin that shows American coin iconography evolving from what had been its traditional six-pointed star to the five-pointed star of the present day.

 :) v.

Was there any significance in the number of points on the star? And was a there a reason for the change? I can imagine the field day that various loopy anti-semitic conspiracy theorists would have had if the US had continued with the six-pointed star.  ;D
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 05, 2011, 04:34:59 PM
This star appeared on the reverse of all Ghana's first coins after independence. It is the African star of freedom, and it appears on the Ghanaian flag.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on December 05, 2011, 05:44:59 PM
Was there any significance in the number of points on the star? And was a there a reason for the change? I can imagine the field day that various loopy anti-semitic conspiracy theorists would have had if the US had continued with the six-pointed star.  ;D

Speaking strictly from memory, the reason(s) as it(they) relate(s) to coinage seem somewhat unclear, but one conjecture that I have read was that the five-point star simply seemed more modern, and also (and more persuasively) I have heard it mentioned that the five-point star was in the Washington family's coat-of-arms, and found its way into American flag, coin, and various official iconographies thereby.

 :) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on December 07, 2011, 05:29:34 AM
The fairly obvious one is fifty stars representing fifty states. But maybe each star represents a value of 1 cent too? ;)

1) A circle of fifty stars for fifty states, exactly as chrisild says. And interesting thought about the 50 stars for 50 cents, but that’s only a coincidence (15, 16, 46 and 48 stars have also appeared on American coins representing the current number of states in the Union); and

2) another set of thirteen stars for the 13 original states, as is very often found on U.S. coins; but

3) Note the grouping of the 13 stars (9 above the eagle’s head, and 4 to the right of the head)—symbolic of the first 9 states to ratify the Constitution, that being the number needed to give the document effect.

 :) v.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=12667.0;attach=22957;image)
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: malj1 on December 10, 2011, 11:46:34 AM
Two different friends both came back from a holiday in the Cook Islands with a gift of one of these coins featuring Tangaroa, a Male Fertility God. I wonder why?

[also another of the coins to feature stars]
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: malj1 on December 10, 2011, 11:48:43 AM
And the second version - 16th FORUM 2nd P.I.C. & MINI GAMES 1985

Both taken from circulation. But not really related to the pound - now. Until 1967, the New Zealand pound was used on the Cook Islands, when it was replaced by the New Zealand dollar. In 1972, coins were issued specifically for the Cook Islands.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 10, 2011, 03:18:36 PM
Tangaroa, a Male Fertility God.

Actually a hermaphroditic fertility god. S/he is clutching a pregnant belly.  :D
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on December 10, 2011, 03:25:36 PM
3) Note the grouping of the 13 stars (9 above the eagle’s head, and 4 to the right of the head)—symbolic of the first 9 states to ratify the Constitution, that being the number needed to give the document effect.

Ah, that is interesting, thanks - I had no idea about this significance. Sure, I know what the 13 stars represent, but had thought that the "distribution" on the JFK Half was kind of arbitrary. Well, live and learn ... 8)

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: Arminius on December 10, 2011, 08:28:08 PM
The ancient mints had stars (and other heavenly bodies) too:

(http://www.arminius-numismatics.com/coppermine1414/cpg1414/albums/userpics/10001/10213v.jpg)

The Arsacid Kingdom of Parthia, Orodes II., Ecbatana mint, 57-38 BC.,
AR Drachm (17-20 mm / 3.97 g).
Obv.: diademed bust left, wart on forehead, neck torque ends in sea horse; star before, crescent above star behind.
Rev. above: BAΣIΛEΩΣ / BAΣIΛEΩN ; on r.: AP-ΣAKOY ; in ex.: EYEPΓETOY / ΔIKAIOY ; on l.: EΠIΦANOYΣ / [Φ]IΛEΛΛHNO[Σ] , archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow; anchor behind, AΓ T (Ecbatana) monogram below bow.
Sellwood 48.9; Shore 261; BMC Parthia pg. 90, 185 (Orodes I) ; Sear GC 7445 .

 ;D
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 29, 2011, 09:06:41 PM
Cuba's old coins carry a lot of stars. I understand that this is the white star, symbolising independence from the Americans Spanish, that is taken from its flag.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on December 29, 2011, 09:30:21 PM
Later, on Franco and Juan Carlos I pesetas, it was used to include the year when the coin had been minted on the reverse, while the year on the obverse stated the year when the design had been approved

They stopped doing that 30 years ago. Much easier for the eyes now. :) And as for the older pieces, in a few cases (such as the 1 peseta 1871) the "star date" was not even the production year ...

Cuba's old coins carry a lot of stars. I understand that this is the white star, symbolising independence from the Americans, that is taken from its flag.

Originally it meant independence from Spain. But in later years the significance may have "shifted". :)  The current centavo circulation coins (not the convertible peso coins) have pretty much the same design, with Roman numerals in a circle.

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: Abhay on December 30, 2011, 01:57:19 AM
The Pagoda Coins from East India Company - Madras Presidency.

Abhay
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: $$ on December 30, 2011, 05:09:47 AM
Hyderabad mint 10 rs coin with star mark and many other in low denomination.

Samir
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 30, 2011, 03:21:54 PM
The large star often seen on the coins of Brazil is taken from the Brazilian coat of arms. Within that star, the smaller stars represent the constellation of the Southern Cross, used as a national symbol also by Australia, New Zealand and other Commonwealth Countries of Australasia and Oceania.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on December 30, 2011, 05:03:14 PM
The large star often seen on the coins of Brazil is taken from the Brazilian coat of arms. Within that star, the smaller stars represent the constellation of the Southern Cross....
The "cruzeiro" itself is also a reference to the constellation, or so I've read.

 :) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on December 30, 2011, 05:42:51 PM
Thanks.

The first Cuban coin series after independence (1915?) was struck in the U.S., I think I remember, and might actually have been designed by one of the mint's employees. But I'm not sure about any of this. Guess I know what I'll be reading up on later.

 :) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 31, 2011, 10:33:16 PM
The red star of Communism. USSR, 1 rouble, 1967.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 31, 2011, 10:38:51 PM
United by a love of stars. US half dollar, 1934. Texas Centennial Eagle Star.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: Figleaf on December 31, 2011, 10:57:31 PM
The other lone star state floating on oil. What was the Caltex logo again? :-X

Peterg]
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: malj1 on December 31, 2011, 11:42:11 PM
This Star Trek is interesting.

eBay has huge numbers of Mardi Gras doubloons. This one reads, "Space, the Final Frontier." It shows the Star Ship Enterprise. It was minted for Mardi Gras 1985 by the Krewe of Pegasus.

Mardi Gras doubloons are brightly colored aluminum coins about the size of a silver dollar. They are 1 1/2 inches in diameter. They were thrown by Krewe members from Mardi Gras floats. Doubloons usually have the symbol of the Krewe on the front along with the date the Krewe was organized, the back side usually has the theme for that years parade as well as the date. Each Krewe may have a number of different doubloons for each years parade. Usually the silver ones are the most common, followed by a range of colors from red to gold. Some Krewes mint real bronze, silver and even gold doubloons, however these are very rare and seldom put up for sale. Many Mardi Gras doubloons are fairly rare outside of New Orleans, and many are rare even in the city.

Information obtained from eBay.

The background on these Doubloons contain many stars.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on January 03, 2012, 04:52:06 AM
Confederate stars on another Mardi Gras token.

 :) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: malj1 on January 03, 2012, 05:14:05 AM
That is reminiscent of our Eureka flag.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Eureka_Flag.svg/200px-Eureka_Flag.svg.png)

More here.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eureka_Flag (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eureka_Flag)
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: villa66 on January 03, 2012, 05:30:01 AM
I had no idea...thanks.

 ;) v.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 04, 2012, 07:20:11 PM
The stars on the Bosnian coins come from their flag and symbolise Europe. They are meant to be infinite in number and thus they continue from top to bottom.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 04, 2012, 07:28:35 PM
The star on this 5 centimes coin of the Congo Free State also comes from its flag.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 04, 2012, 08:33:05 PM
The coat of arms of Mauritius, seen here on the reverse of a rupee coin, show a white star in the lower right quarter, and on the left-hand side is a key. These are referred to in the Latin motto “Stella Clavisque Maris Indici”, meaning “The Star and the Key of the Indian Ocean“.

(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=27394.0;attach=45264;image)

 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 04, 2012, 09:34:46 PM
Somalia, 1 centesimo, 1950.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 04, 2012, 09:40:14 PM
Comoros, 100 francs, 2003 and 1977.



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=20754.0;attach=33514;image)



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=20754.0;attach=33513;image)
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 04, 2012, 09:44:33 PM
Malaysia.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on January 05, 2012, 07:27:30 PM
Atatürk attempted to secularise his country, but he never secularised the flag, nor that part of it that appears on Turkey's coins.

What I have always found interesting about the Turkish flag is the orientation of the star. Usually, and especially if you have just one five-pointed star, one point is at the top. Not in this case ...

Interestingly the star and the crescent were, at least originally, not really Islamic symbols.* Seems they were popular in Asia Minor even in ancient and Christian (Byzantium) times. So Atatürk sure wanted to emphasize a certain continuity, but not necessarily a religious one..

* Had you lived in Vienna in the 16th and the 17th century, you would have found perfectly normal, I guess, that at the top of St. Stephen's Cathedral they did not have a cross but a star-and-crescent symbol. From what I have read, that referred to the Emperor (moon) and the Pope (star). After the second siege, or Battle of Vienna, that symbol was taken away as it was the emblem of the enemy ...

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on January 29, 2012, 03:28:00 AM
Left: Panama, 50 Centesimos, 1905.  Right: Panama, 1/10 Balboa, 1953.

I found the following on the web: "Panama coins before 1930 have 7 stars, and starting in 1930 have 9 stars."  According to Wikipedia: "On the eagle, in arc form, nine gold stars go in representation of the provinces into which the Republic is divided."
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on February 10, 2012, 03:49:51 PM
US quarter, 2004.   Texas, The Lone Star State.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on May 03, 2012, 02:22:15 PM
An Omani gold rial of 1975.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on May 04, 2012, 10:32:13 PM
Danzig, 2 Gulden, 1923.  Does this star from the Danzig coat of arms have any significance, I wonder?
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on May 05, 2012, 12:21:32 PM
The star is not actually part of the CoA; it was just used for the coin design. Mabye the artist felt an urge to fill the empty space between the two lion heads :)

On some coins from Danzig, however, you see a star with eight points; that refers to the city's first seal (http://www.en.gdansk.gda.pl/about,2,22.html). The scene with a cog and a star has been used to some extent in other Hanse cities too; attached is an image of the German €10 coin (issued in 2006) that commemorates 650 years of the Hanseatic League.

Christian

 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on July 30, 2013, 11:29:19 PM
Spain, 100 pesetas, 1993.  European Unity.  This presumably a reference to the EU.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on July 31, 2013, 01:17:28 AM
Spain, 100 pesetas, 1993.  European Unity.  This presumably a reference to the EU.

Not really ... 1993 was an Año Santo Compostelano (or Xacobeo); whenever St. James Day (25 July) is a Sunday, the year is such a Holy Year, with lots of pilgrims and tourists coming to Santiago. The Council of Europe - which is not an EU organization - had already made the "Paths of the Santiago Pilgrims" a European Route of Culture in 1987. Guess that "Camino de Europa" is used in that sense.) In 1993 the primary Way of St. James in Spain, shown in red here (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5e/Stjacquescompostelle.png/640px-Stjacquescompostelle.png), became a Unesco Cultural Heritage "site".

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on July 31, 2013, 01:30:47 AM
You're always very knowledgeable about Spanish (and Portuguese) coins, so I'm guessing you're a big fan and have a lot of them in your collection.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on July 31, 2013, 01:50:46 AM
Yes, there is that ... but I also like Romanesque art and architecture a lot. So I have visited many places along the "camino" ... long before it became so famous (and crowded), and before the shell/star logo* got almost ubiquitous. ;) Sure, to some extent this is a tourism marketing thing. But in the Middle Ages, pilgrims actually went to Santiago because that was a way of doing penitence and getting pardon for sins. There was an enormous "infrastructure" with churches and chapels, hostels and hospitals ... Even today, and even though I am not religious, I find it interesting to learn about such connections. One time I was in Lund (southern Sweden) where they have a Romanesque cathedral, and was surprised to see the familiar Camino logo there.

* As far as I know, this is supposed to be a combination of a shell/scallop. The scallop was used by many pilgrims; "Compostela" may be derived from Latin "Campus Stellae", Field of the Star.

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: brg5658 on July 31, 2013, 06:11:24 PM
Still looking for a 10 Centimes that fits my collection:

(http://i1202.photobucket.com/albums/bb364/brg5658/Photography-3/belgian_congo_set_obv_zps0cecd4dc.jpg)
(http://i1202.photobucket.com/albums/bb364/brg5658/Photography-3/belgian_congo_set_rev_zps7351bf51.jpg)
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 02, 2013, 08:03:27 PM
(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=13575.0;attach=36692;image)

Western Samoa, 1 dollar.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 02, 2013, 08:04:01 PM
Western Samoa, 1 sene, 1967.  The Southern Cross again.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 03, 2013, 02:06:11 PM
Netherlands Antilles set, 1983.

In 1983 the Netherlands Antilles consisted of six islands. Each island was allotted a star on the coat o farms. You can see that the six stars are then arranged in three different ways on the reverse sides of the coins.

The constituent islands are named on the commemorative 25 guilders of 1973.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 03, 2013, 02:09:16 PM
In 1986 Aruba left the Netherlands Antilles to become an independent country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands - similar to, say, New Zealand or Jamaica as commonwealth realms, with QEII as head of state.

This meant that one star was removed from the coat of arms. You can see the difference on these 1 guilder coins of 1978 and 1993.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: SquareEarth on August 04, 2013, 10:28:58 AM
Chinese Moonshot Commemorative
Actually only one of them is a true star(the sun)
(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110122410/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/580/i4g7.jpg)

the whole set:
(https://web.archive.org/web/20151110122436/http://imagizer.imageshack.us/scaled/landing/850/dao2.jpg)
(So we have here, two satellite (one artificial one natural), ten planets( pluto included, earth twice) as well as one star (sol invictus)

Regards
Chuan
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 10, 2013, 03:03:59 PM
Equatorial Guinea, 1 peseta, 1969.

The six stars above the shield of the coat of arms represent the mainland and the five main islands in the country.

On the obverse, the dates appear in the stars, as on many Spanish coins.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 12, 2013, 07:55:36 PM
Aruba, 10 florins, 2006.  Three small stars on the reverse, one large one on the obverse. What is their significance?
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on August 12, 2013, 11:39:58 PM
Aruba, 10 florins, 2006.  Three small stars on the reverse, one large one on the obverse. What is their significance?

The three stars ... dunno. Maybe they represent the three parts of the Kingdom which back then were the (European) Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba. Now the single star on the other side is the one from the Aruban flag, I suppose.

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: Figleaf on August 14, 2013, 05:42:03 PM
I think the there stars refer to the three islands that chose a status apart in the kingdom of the Netherlands: Aruba, Curaçao, Sint Maarten.

Peter
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on August 14, 2013, 07:46:11 PM
Two different theories, but yours sounds more precise, Peter, so I'll go for that.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on April 01, 2014, 01:59:38 PM
Portugal, $100, 1990.  Celestial navigation.
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on November 03, 2014, 03:27:00 AM
Greece, 5 drachmai, 1930. 

What does the six-pointed star represent?
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: @josephjk on November 03, 2014, 11:31:13 AM
1 Pice - Muhammad Sa'adat Ali Khan, KM29 - India - Tonk state
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: @josephjk on November 03, 2014, 11:35:10 AM
Pakistan 1 annas  KM3 & KM8
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: Miner on November 03, 2014, 11:49:32 AM
Greece, 5 drachmai, 1930. 

What does the six-pointed star represent?
About six-pointed star can not say, but the seven-pointed star represents the seven Ionian Islands.
Greece 2 euro 2014.
(http://savepic.ru/5985911.jpg)
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: chrisild on November 03, 2014, 04:35:29 PM
What does the six-pointed star represent?

Hmm, maybe the Royal Mint knows? They made most of those 5 drachmai 1930 coins. Above the Phoenix you see a Christian cross, and the rays represent the Holy Spirit. So I suppose the star has a religious meaning too. Could be the star of Mary (as in Hamburg's CoA), could be the hexagram that combines the masculine and the feminine, united to represent love and life. We learned roughly that when afrasi showed us the Marktkirche in Hannover at the WoC meeting last month. :)

Christian
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on December 25, 2014, 05:45:46 PM
Remember the Australian seven-pointed Commonwealth star?



(http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=22697.0;attach=50372;image)

Here is another one, on the New Guinea shilling of 1935.
 
 
Title: Re: Stars on coins
Post by: <k> on April 07, 2015, 03:01:47 PM
Argentina, 1 peso, 1998.  The Southern Cross.