Author Topic: Designs that make use of the exergue  (Read 4743 times)

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Offline <k>

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Designs that make use of the exergue
« on: May 25, 2011, 08:16:11 PM »
I would find it difficult to define the exergue precisely, so I have looked it up:

A space on the reverse of a coin or medal, usually below the central design and often giving the date and place of engraving.


I found another definition:

1.  The space on a coin or medal below or around the pictures or designs, often used for the date, place, etc.
2.  The inscription in this space.


The space AROUND the design? I had never heard THAT definition before. Do we agree with it?

Could this inner circle on the reverse of this coin be considered an exergue?




Anyway, my theory is that the distinct use of the exergue in designs is rather old-fashioned and has become less common in modern times. We shall see.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 08:22:28 PM by coffeetime »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2011, 08:19:55 PM »
Here are my first exhibits. On British coins, designs depicting Britannia often separate the exergue from the rest of the design with a line. This line then acts as a plinth on which the subject (in this case Britannia) can stand. This was done both on the old pre-decimal halfpenny and penny, and also on the first decimal 50p coin design.



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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2011, 08:21:28 PM »
This practice is not only found in the UK, of course, or only in relatively modern times.



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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2011, 08:23:55 PM »
Here is a very modern example, on the new coin series of Uruguay. You can see the line of the exergue running across both obverse and reverse on these coins.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 08:13:27 PM by <k> »
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Offline Prosit

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 08:32:12 PM »
In that case, I would like to know how the definition of exergue differs from the definition of the field.
Dale


The space AROUND the design? I had never heard THAT definition before. Do we agree with it?

Austrokiwi

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2011, 09:35:40 PM »
I have gone to my old and trusty reference:Freys Dictionary of Numismatic Terms: the definition given is subtly different to the one at the top of the thread and seems to highlight the difference between field and exergue:

" The lower segment usually on the reverse of a coin separated by a horizontal bar. It frequently contains the date, initials of the designer and in some instances  the place of minting. "

I see the "horizontal bar" as the key discriminator and I read it as suggesting not all coins have an exergue.

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2011, 09:41:52 PM »
I have gone to my old and trusty reference:Freys Dictionary of Numismatic Terms: the definition given is subtly different to the one at the top of the thread and seems to highlight the difference between field and exergue:

" The lower segment usually on the reverse of a coin separated by a horizontal bar."

I see the "horizontal bar" as the key discriminator and I read it as suggesting not all coins have an exergue.

I had always understood that it was a definite part of the field, and that it was sometimes separated by a horizontal bar, but that the existence of a bar did not bring the exergue itself into existence: i.e. I believe that the exergue always has a physical reality rather than a notional one. Interesting to see the different definitions and opinions, though.  :)

Do YOU believe in the existence of the exergue? I'll have to ask Professor Dawkins about this one.  :D
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Offline Prosit

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2011, 10:26:01 PM »
On the old style US Buffalo Nickel...the buffalo on the mound...the five cents is in the mound
and is considered in the exergue.  There is no real dividing line on that one.  The mound is part of the design.

Dale

Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2011, 10:27:12 PM »
On the old style US Buffalo Nickel...the buffalo on the mound...the five cents in in the mound
and is considered in the exergue.  There is no real dividing line on that one.  The mound is part of the design.

Dale

I bow to your superior knowledge of mounds.  :-[
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Offline Prosit

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2011, 10:31:32 PM »
Not my knowledge.  A long time ago, a university degree meant you knew something.
Now it means you know where to look it up  ;)

Anyway the PCGS web site labeled it as exergue so I took that as gospel, I found it on the internet so it has to be true!!

Dale



I bow to your superior knowledge of mounds.  :-[

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2011, 09:48:35 PM »
I checked a French dictionary, which was good, because it confirmed my prejudice ;D. There is agreement on purpose and use of the exergue, but the definition does not mention a line. In my mind too, there is no need for a line as long as it is clear where approximately it would have been if there had been a line. The exergue creates an area that is set apart from the rest, but the separation does not have to be physical.

I would argue that the exact definition doesn't matter much in practice, as long as speaker and listener understand each other.

Peter
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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2011, 01:38:30 PM »
An unusual use of the exergue on an 1848 UK farthing. Some nice plants are flowering there.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 08:14:00 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2011, 02:00:46 PM »
A modern Israeli use of the exergue.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 08:18:44 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2011, 02:04:35 PM »
Iran, 100 dinars, 1908. Interesting use on the reverse on an exergue within the inner circle.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 08:16:15 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Designs that make use of the exergue
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2012, 12:09:24 AM »
Syria, 50 piastres, 1947.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 08:14:44 PM by <k> »
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