Author Topic: Omnibus Issues in Coins  (Read 6517 times)

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Offline Abhay

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Omnibus Issues in Coins
« on: March 20, 2011, 04:53:14 PM »
Although, the term OMNIBUS is usually used in Philatelics to describe an issue of stamps by several countries with a common subject and which may share a uniform design. 

Are there any such issues in the Coins? One that I am aware of is the FAO series of coins issued by many countries.

Abhay
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Offline Bimat

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Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2011, 05:19:28 PM »
50 years of United Nations? I'm not sure if it was omnibus issue but many countries issued a coin commemorating its 50th anniversary in 1995.

Aditya
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Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2011, 05:22:37 PM »
I guess coins issued for Louis Braille also fits into this category.

Cheers ;D
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Offline Bimat

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Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2011, 05:27:09 PM »
I guess coins issued for Louis Braille also fits into this category.
I don't think so. Looking at what wikipedia says, it was indeed an omnibus issue. India (2 rupees), Belgium (€2), Italy (€2), USA ($1) and (probably) France, (unconfirmed) issued a coin commemorating birth bicentenary of Louis Braille. The American and French versions were NCLT. I have the former three circulating commemoratives in my collection. :)

Aditya

« Last Edit: March 20, 2011, 05:33:15 PM by Bimat »
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2011, 05:31:39 PM »
I believe there is a Belgian euro coin that was also issued in Luxembourg, but forgot the details. I am sure someone will have them. Also, somewhere in the back of the mind, is a design that was used on silver pseudo coins of several Latin American countries, possibly also Spain and a joint US-Swedish (?) commemorative...

Peter
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Offline Bimat

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Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2011, 05:39:48 PM »
I believe there is a Belgian euro coin that was also issued in Luxembourg, but forgot the details.
I know what you mean. :D 2005 €2 commemorative, right? It has something to do with Schengen agreement. But it was purely Belgian issue..

So I can think of two more :

€2 (2007)-Thirteen euro using countries (and one non euro country-Hungary. It was denominated in Forint, of course) had a joint issue commemorating 50th anniversary of Treaty of Rome.

€2 (2009)-Sixteen euro using countries had a joint issue commemorating 10th anniversary of European Monetary Union...

In 2011, we can again expect (in fact there are plans) a joint issue by euro using countries commemorating 10 years of euro cash..

Aditya

It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline bart

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2011, 05:56:51 PM »
I know what you mean. :D 2005 €2 commemorative, right? It has something to do with Schengen agreement. But it was purely Belgian issue..

Aditya

It had nothing to do with the Schengen agreement, but with the BLEU: Belgian-Luxembourgian Economical Union. But you're right: even if the coin shows the heads of Albert II and his nephew Henri of Luxembourg, it was purely a Belgian issue.

Bart

Offline Bimat

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Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2011, 06:01:47 PM »
It had nothing to do with the Schengen agreement, but with the BLEU: Belgian-Luxembourgian Economical Union.
Whoops, sorry! My mistake! Thanks for correcting me.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2011, 11:35:25 PM »
I found the Ibero-American series mentioned above. The official name is "encuentro de dos mundos 1492-1992", meeting of two worlds. All the pseudo-coins have on one side their own representation or arms with the country name and a circle of arms or representations of the participating countries around. The other side is different on all pieces. I have attached the Argentine and Spanish entries as an example.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 03:04:14 PM by coffeetime »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2011, 12:04:19 AM »
And here is the joint US-Swedish issue, on a group of Swedes that settled in Delaware. The area was eventually taken by the Dutch, who lost it to the English who in turn lost it to the settlers ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2011, 01:09:22 AM »
Us mint coins of Louis Braille :Proof Louis Braille Commemorative Silver Dollar Obverse

Obverse


2009 Louis Braille Commemorative Reverse


Reverse


Other links at WOC link1 & link2

Cheers ;D





« Last Edit: March 21, 2011, 01:33:25 AM by aan09 »
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



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Offline billtucker

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2011, 12:09:28 PM »
hmm...I searched for the expensive coins . Though the list was an impressing one but yeh :D this collection is awesome man ;)

Offline chrisild

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2011, 01:46:16 PM »
In theory we could add all those "Olympic" coins. First they were issued by the country of the host city only; in recent years many countries issue them, also as fundraisers, regardless where the Games are.

The Iberoamerican series have already been mentioned; then there are coins that were issued by Portugal and Spain with the same themes and designs: 20 years (2006) and 25 years (2011) of EU membership. France and the UK issued Entente Cordiale coins with the same design in 2004. France and the US issued Benjamin Franklin coins in 2006. The US issued a "Jamestown 400" commem in 2007, followed by Poland in 2008. And and and. :)

I have several pieces from here (Federal Republic of Germany) that have themes which were also commemorated by neighboring countries (Austria, GDR, Switzerland). While they do not have the same designs, or identical design elements, they were issued on the same occasion ...

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Omnibus Issues in Coins
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2011, 02:07:54 PM »
A recent issue from Russia and Spain honors this year's "Cultural Exchange Year". The two pieces have basically the same design, featuring Don Quijote and a windmill, plus a ballerina in front of a Russian landscape. Low mintage and proof-only issues.

Russia: 3 rubles (Ag 925)
34 g, 39 mm, mintage 5,000
Spain: 10 euro (Ag 925)
27 g, 40 mm, mintage 7,500

Hope that this Exchange Year dealt or deals with more than the stereotypes depicted on these "coins". ;)  As mentioned above, the two pieces have roughly the same size. The images below are from two different sources (fnmt.es and cbr.ru), and I was too lazy to adapt the sizes ...

Christian
« Last Edit: December 16, 2011, 02:15:50 PM by chrisild »

Offline chrisild

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Ibero-American Series 2010: Historic Coins
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2011, 02:13:25 PM »
Which reminds me ... last year's Ibero-American series of collector coins I find quite interesting. After all, it was about coins on coins. Each of the nine participating countries issued a silver proof piece featuring historically significant coinage.

Those "8 reales" pieces (face value depends on the issuing country) have a weight of 27 g and a diameter of 40 mm each. The entire set - nine coins, one medal - costs €420 when you buy it from the Spanish Mint. What follows below is the text (English version) from the website http://www.fnmt.es/index.php?cha=collector&scha=14&page=224&spage=496 of the mint.

8th Ibero-American Series: Historic Ibero-American Coins

The set is composed of nine coins, one for each participating country, and a sterling silver medal commemorating the 8th Ibero-American Series. As in the previous series, the nine coins are minted in proof quality. The maximum mint run for this set is 12,000 units. A unique feature of this series is that each participating country has accepted that its national coat-of-arms appear on the coins of the other nations involved, something that has never occurred before in twenty-five centuries of Numismatic History. The reverse sides of the coins, therefore, show the national coat-of-arms of the issuing country surrounded by the coats-of-arms of the other participating nations.

Argentina: The obverse reproduces a replica of the obverse of the country's first 1-Peso coin minted in silver after 1881. This coin was popularly known as the patacon, the colloquial term used to designate colonial Spanish-American coins of similar characteristics.



Cuba: The obverse reproduces a coin minted during the siege by the British of the city of Santiago de Cuba from July 29 to December 19, 1741. The coin issue was decided upon by the City Council and the city's Governor.



Guatemala: The obverse reproduces the first orbicular or circular coin that was minted in Guatemala after 1754. It is a silver coin of the "pillar" design type. The inclusion of the letter "G" identifies the Guatemalan mint. This design was utilized by different American mints during the same period of time.



Mexico: The obverse reproduces the obverse and the reverse of the 1-Peso coins commonly called pesos del caballito and struck in 1910 during the decline of the Porfirio Diaz dictatorship. The obverse displays the country's coat-of-arms charged with a spirited Mexican eagle, facing front with wings outspread. The reverse depicts an equestrian figure of Liberty.



Nicaragua: The obverse reproduces the reverse of the first coins minted in the cordoba currency, created in March 1912 to replace the Peso. It shows the face of a rising sun radiating over a range of five volcanoes that represent the five Central American countries. This design has its origin in the metal 1-real coin which was struck in 1824 by the Central American Federation three years after the Central American countries had gained independence from Spain.



Paraguay: The obverse reproduces a coin known by the name of cobrecito de leon, an allusion to its slight worth. These coins were minted in the city of Birmingham (England). They were released into circulation by a decree dated March 1847 and they circulated until 1877. Twelve copper coins represented one real; eight reales made up one peso.



Peru: The obverse reproduces the reverse of the first coin struck at the Mint of Lima in 1568. These coins featured the two Pillars of Hercules surmounted by crowns, standing on ocean waves, with the legend "PLUS ULTRA" that had been the imperial motto of Carlos V in reference to the scope of Spain's power overseas. Also shown is a letter "P" indicating Peru as the place of minting.



Portugal: The obverse is dedicated to the Escudo, the currency that replaced the 1000-reales by the Decree of May 22, 1911, after the establishment of the Republic. The design, in deference to the fact that the escudo still very much abides in the sentiment of the Portuguese public, utilizes the visual space of the coin to trace a trip back through time and through memory.



Spain: The obverse reproduces the reverse of an 8-reales coin that was struck in Seville under the Catholic Monarchs Isabella I and Ferdinand V of Castile. The mint mark, assayer's mark and face value were stamped on the obverse. So the symbols of the yoke and the arrows also appear on all the coins from 1 to 8 reales that were struck by any of the mints under these monarchs.



8-reales silver Medal: As in earlier editions of the Ibero-American Series, the nine coins from the different countries taking part are accompanied by a Commemorative Medal. The obverse features the maps of the Iberian Peninsula and of Central and South America, linked by a fly press. It also shows the mint mark of the Spanish Royal Mint and the legend "A Meeting of Two Worlds". The reverse presents an inner circle displaying the title of the 8th Series, "Historic Ibero-American Coins", surrounded by a border featuring the coats-of-arms of the participating countries.



(All images: RCM-FNMT)

Christian
« Last Edit: December 26, 2015, 08:05:20 PM by Niels »