Malta's first decimal coinage of 1972

Started by <k>, March 17, 2011, 01:36:52 AM

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<k>

Malta on  map.jpg

Malta's location south of Italy.


From Wikipedia:

The Republic of Malta is an island country in the European Union. It consists of an archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea and is considered part of Southern Europe. The official languages are Maltese and English, and 66% of the population is conversational in the Italian language.

Malta has been inhabited since approximately 5900 BC. Its location in the centre of the Mediterranean has historically given it great strategic importance as a naval base. A succession of powers have contested and ruled the islands, including the Phoenicians and Carthaginians, Romans, Greeks, Arabs, Normans, Aragonese, Knights of St. John, French, and British.

With a population of about 516,000 over an area of 316 km2 (122 sq mi), Malta is the world's tenth-smallest country in area and the fourth most densely populated sovereign country. Its capital is Valletta, which is the smallest national capital in the European Union by area and population.

Malta became a British colony in 1813, serving as a way station for ships and as the headquarters for the British Mediterranean Fleet. It was besieged by the Axis powers during World War II and was an important Allied base for operations in North Africa and the Mediterranean. The British parliament passed the Malta Independence Act in 1964, giving Malta independence from the United Kingdom as the State of Malta, with Elizabeth II as its queen. The country became a republic in 1974. It has been a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations and the United Nations since independence, and joined the European Union in 2004. It became part of the eurozone monetary union in 2008.

Malta has had Christians since the time of Early Christianity, though it was predominantly Muslim while under Arab rule. Muslim rule ended with the Norman invasion of Malta by Roger I in 1091. Today, Catholicism is the state religion. The economy of Malta is heavily reliant on tourism, and the country promotes itself as a Mediterranean tourist destination with its warmer climate compared to the rest of Europe, numerous recreational areas, and architectural and historical monuments, including three UNESCO World Heritage Sitesand seven megalithic temples.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta and Europe.jpg

Malta's location in the Mediterranean, between Sicily and Tunisia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Map of Malta.jpg

Map of Malta.


From Wikipedia:

Malta is an archipelago in the central Mediterranean, some 80 km (50 miles) from southern Italy across the Malta Channel. Only the three largest islands — Malta (Malta), Gozo (Għawdex), and Comino (Kemmuna) — are inhabited. The islands of the archipelago lie on the Malta plateau, a shallow shelf formed from the high points of a land bridge between Sicily and North Africa that became isolated as sea levels rose after the last ice age. The archipelago is located on the African tectonic plate.

Numerous bays along the indented coastline of the islands provide good harbours. The landscape consists of low hills with terraced fields. The highest point in Malta is Ta' Dmejrek, at 253 m (830 ft), near Dingli. Although there are some small rivers at times of high rainfall, there are no permanent rivers or lakes on Malta. However, some watercourses have fresh water running all year round.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Flag of Malta.png


The flag of Malta is white in the hoist and red in the fly.

A representation of the George Cross, awarded to Malta by George VI in 1942, is carried.

It is edged with red, in the canton of the white stripe.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Coat of arms of Malta.jpg


The present coat of arms is described by the Emblem and Public Seal of Malta Act of 1988 as a shield showing an heraldic representation of the national flag of Malta; above the shield is a mural crown in gold with a sally port and five turrets representing the fortifications of Malta and denoting a city-state; and around the shield is a wreath of two branches: the dexter of olive, the sinister of palm, symbols of peace and traditionally associated with Malta, all in their proper colours, tied at base with a white ribbon, backed red and upon which are written the words Repubblika ta' Malta ("Republic of Malta" in Maltese) in capital letters in black.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

From Wikipedia:

The lira or pound (until 1986 in English) was the currency of Malta from 1972 until 31 December 2007. One lira was divided into 100 cents, each of 10 mils.

Decimal coinage was introduced in 1972, one year after the United Kingdom had issued its own decimal coinage. The Maltese currency was based on the "pound and mil" system, in denominations of 2, 3, and 5 mils, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 50 cents. A mil was worth one thousandth of a Maltese pound.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

This design series was unusual in that the coin obverses all carried different designs. The obverse of a coin is generally recognised by the fact that it shows the country name, in this case 'Malta'. Meanwhile, the reverses all featured a wreath design, along with the denominations.

Maltese artist Emvin Cremona is often credited with these designs. Whilst his ideas may have informed or inspired some of the eventual designs, the finished designs were created and modelled by Englishman Christopher Ironside. To see some of the unrealised designs for this series, by both Mr. Cremona and Mr. Ironside, click on the link below:

Malta: decimal variations
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta 2 mils 1972.jpg

The lowest denomination of the series was, curiously, the 2 mils coin. The obverse of the coin featured the Maltese cross.

Quaint dolphins dance around the edge of the design, reminding you that Malta is an island nation in the Mediterranean.

This feature appeared on the obverse of all these coins, adding to their unique look. There really is not another set like it.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Maltese cross.png


From Wikipedia:

The Maltese cross is a cross symbol, consisting of four "V" or arrowhead shaped concave quadrilaterals. These converge at a central vertex at right angles, with two tips pointing outward symmetrically.

The cross is chiefly associated with the Knights Hospitaller, and specifically the Order of St. John, now the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, and by extension with the island of Malta.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta 2  mils.jpg


The reverse of the aluminium 2 mils coin featured a wreath, like all the reverse designs of this set.

The wreath is composed of vine leaves - fittingly for a Mediterranean country.


The wreath as a numismatic design feature became so common in the 19th century that it was almost a cliché.

Nowadays it is regarded as somewhat old-fashioned but can still be found on coin designs.

Albania and Switzerland are two countries that feature wreaths on their coins.


See: Wreaths and Sprays on Coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta 3  mils  1972-.jpg



Like the 2 mils coin, the 3 mils coin was made of aluminium.

Its composition was 96.9 to 96.1% aluminium and 3.9 to 3.1% magnesium.

Also like the 2 mils coin, it had a scalloped shape, with 8 notches.


The attractive obverse design featured a Maltese honey bee on a honeycomb.

It was one of relatively few bees to appear on modern coin designs.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta 3  mils  1972.jpg

The reverse of the 3 mils coin featured a wreath, like all the reverse designs of this set.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta 5 mils 1972.jpg


The 5 mils coin was made of aluminium.

It had a scalloped shape, with 12 notches.


The obverse design featured a medieval earthen lampstand.

This coin was the highest denomination of the mil coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Malta 5 mils~.jpg

The reverse of the 5 mils coin featured a wreath, like all the reverse designs of this set.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.