Trees on coins

Started by <k>, February 17, 2011, 02:23:04 AM

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<k>

Yemen 20 rials 2004.jpg

Yemen 2004. 20 rials. Dragon's blood tree (cinnabar).
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<k>

#1
Coco de mer trees.jpg



Seychelles 5  rupees.  Coco-de-mer palm tree.
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<k>

#2
Philippines 2 piso 1983.jpg

Philippines. Palm tree.
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<k>

#3


Madagascar 5 ariary. Baobabs tree.
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<k>

#4
Zimbabwe 10c 1980-.jpg

Zimbabwe 10c. Baobab tree.


Baobab tree.jpg
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<k>

#5
Guat silk cotton tree.jpg


Guatemala5c1949.jpg




Guatemala, 5 centavos. Silk cotton tree.
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<k>

#6
Colombia 500 pesos guacari tree.jpg

Colombia. Guacari tree.
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<k>

#7
Mauritius 5 rupees  2012.jpg

Mauritius, 5 rupees, 1992.  Palm trees.
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<k>

#8





Seychelles, 5 rupees, 1972.  Giant tortoise and palm trees.
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<k>

#9
Prince Edward Island 1871 1c.jpg

I had never seen this beautiful Prince Edward Island cent until today.

Who knows which species of trees are depicted on it?
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<k>

#10



The Lebanese are fond of their cedar trees. Here's a superb design from a 1929 50 piastres.

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<k>

#11
Germany 5RM 1927.jpg

A nice German oak tree from 1929 now, on the 5 Reichsmark coin.
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Figleaf

#12
Just like the Germans are fond of their forests. The oak tree, symbol of strength and power and for many centuries raw material for everything sturdy, from furniture to ships.

This coin illustrates a tree problem: trees are big. If you look at them from some distance, you can't see which tree it is and if you move closer, you lose part of the tree. I think that explains why the leaves are out of proportion.

Interesting detail: the legend EINIGKEIT UND RECHT UND FREIHEIT (unity and justice and freedom) is taken from the third stanza of the German national anthem. After the second world war, the first stanza was thought to be too nationalistic. However, this coin precedes that decision...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Quote from: Figleaf on March 03, 2011, 07:10:52 PM
Interesting detail: the legend EINIGKEIT UND RECHT UND FREIHEIT (unity and justice and freedom) is taken from the third stanza of the German national anthem. After the second world war, the first stanza was thought to be too nationalistic. However, this coin precedes that decision...

Yes, it is the third verse of the "Lied der Deutschen". But this third verse only is the German national anthem. In the German Empire that was different. But even in the Weimar Republic, pretty much every 3 or 5 RM coin had that motto, either on one side (as here) or on the edge.

Another interesting detail is the twigs. See how some do not have any leaves? The designer Maximilian Dasio apparently did that on purpose; for him those twigs represented the territories that were "lost" after WW1.

Christian

chrisild

Here we have a cork oak on a coin from Portugal.



Christian