Interview: Daniel Carr's Designs

Started by chrisild, January 30, 2011, 10:38:30 AM

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chrisild

You may know the American coin and medal designer Daniel Carr; we have some topics here that deal with his designs:
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,6722.0.html
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,3405.0.html

Here is an interview with Carr where he talks about how he designs his pieces, and also about the Gräbener coin press that he bought and uses:
http://www.numismatichub.com/2011/01/interview-with-coin-artist-and-designer.html

Christian

Figleaf

He sounds like a nice guy, contrary to "a certain radio host."

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Coinsforever

Key is  Daniel Carr has shared his  both the experience as a professional and as a Numismatist  .

Gentlemen and down to earth , I like below conversation which reflects his personality.

Quote//

NH: What has been your proudest moment of your career?

DC: I don't know, but I hope it is yet to come.

// Unquote 


Cheers ;D
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

hkfears

In 2021 the Madison County Coin Club of Huntsville, Alabama had Daniel Carr produce a medal for their 20th anniversary.  This medal only has 27 minted in silver.

A new medal for them is being made for 2024.  I would expect less the 40 medals will be produced. See their web site at: http://mccc.anaclubs.org/ for details.

hkfears

The ordering deadline for the 2024 Madison County Coin Club medals is Thursday November 30, 2024.  You can learn more about these medals at http://mccc.anaclubs.org/ .

hkfears

#5
35 silver and 50 copper 2004 MCCC medals are now be produced by the Moonlight Mint.

hkfears

This is an example of one of the silver medals for the Madison County Coin Club:





Mr. Carr donated to the club four error medals, two in silver and two in copper.  Here is a copper one:




Only 35 silver and 50 copper medals were minted.

You can see them all at the club's website at: http://mccc.anaclubs.org/ .


hkfears

The 4 error medals produced -- two in silver and two in copper -- will be auctioned during the Madison County Coin Club's 2024 June 17th meeting.   You can see them at the club's website http://mccc.anaclubs.org/ .   

More information can be found by contacting the club at  madisoncountycoinclub2020@gmail.com .

Figleaf

Coin collectors are funny critters. If they'd collect say porcelain, would they be prepared to pay more for a flawed piece? >:D

I must admit that recycling metallic waste to a "collector's item" and recycling money from those who no longer appreciate it to a common good society of peaceful collectors sounds like a very "green" idea, though. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

I've always had an interest in "flawed" coins as the mistakes add additional interest to the piece. I suppose you could say it gives them a personality that a perfect coin of the same issue doesn't have. Sounds a bit romantic doesn't it?  :D

Bruce
Always Faithful

Figleaf

Not sure if we are talking about the same thing, Bruce. You may have our beloved counterpunches and scribbled exclamations on coins in mind (yes, I can't resist them either, see here). Sticking to porcelain, a chipped plate for a royal event is one thing, the same plate, signed by the royal in question is quite another thing.

You do have a point, though, in the sense that I dislike proofs and proof sets even more, for being "sterile". Indeed, I have additional tolerance for small, genuine minting errors, like a slightly ex-centric hole or comical errors, but there's a line in the sand where the "error" becomes a gimmick, a device to boost sales, or to turn a common coin into a "rarity".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

No, I wasn't commenting on porcelain... a chip on porcelain is just damage and would detract in value and desirability to me.

The same goes for a manufactured error. It's just a gimmick and of no interest to me. A genuine error often makes a coin more interesting in my opinion. It makes it a bit special in an odd sort of way.

Bruce



Always Faithful