Author Topic: Akbar Temple Token  (Read 5212 times)

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Offline Rangnath

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Akbar Temple Token
« on: October 03, 2007, 06:27:46 PM »
I was able to identify this as an Akbar Temple Token.
However, I have questions about this "coin".  The metal seems degraded. Could it be billon?  And the coin is on the light side. Many temple tokens of the same time frame, 1580 AD, weigh more than the 10.5 grams of this coin.  On line, I noticed most weighed between 11.5 and 12.5 grams.  Could this coin be a copy done in a later time? The Akbar rupee weighed around 11.4 grams.

The coin is about 20 mm square.

The third question I have is why? Why were tokens used rather than "real" coins. Why would the state, Akbar?, issue Temple tokens? Were they also used in commercial life and were they substitutes for real coins?
richie

Offline Oesho

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2007, 11:42:48 PM »
Some of the coins of Akbar were very popular with the Muslim community, particular the square mohur with the Kalima within a  lozenge, with in the corners the names of the early Caliphs. Copies of these gold mohurs were used as religious amulets. Initially gold mohurs were probably used for this purpose, but as gold was too costly for the common people, they were copied in (base) silver. There must have been an increasing demand for those religious amulets and subsequently the script on these tokens as well as the fineness of them, degenerated very much. The square form (?chwock-walla? as Indians would call them) also seems to have some religious implication too. Some Princely States struck special issues in a square form as presentation or nazarana coins.  Square coins in India, therefore, are very much looked after by collectors as well.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2007, 01:03:28 PM »
I think the word "amulet" is very well chosen. Obviously, a piece with the Kalima and the names of Caliphs has great mystical value, some of which must rub off on the person wearing it. So what if it's not a coin? It's a magnificent illustration of life in India.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2011, 09:31:01 PM »
OMG... Today I found almost a duplicate copy of this token... I notice that the token did have two hooks on two sides but has been removed later... Seems to be good silver...

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2011, 07:29:27 PM »
I visited a museum of our country few days back. I found that on the display a specimen of this coin has been listed as Mughal rupee. I also found that the 1818 and 1616 half annas with dities have been displayed as East India Company currencies.

I saw pain in me as the museum is a research museum. I am planning to approach to the authority to correct them. But probably they will not believe me.

Islam

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2011, 08:42:21 PM »
PL Gupta in his book 'Coins' lists this coin as a silver rupee (catalog 272). This is now a question mark to me. If Gupta is right then this should be a genuine coin.

Islam

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2011, 08:45:39 PM »
One thing is obvious: the coin in the first message is at best low quality silver and at worst it was once silvered over. In my mind, that does not fit with Akbar silver coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Oesho

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2011, 03:37:33 PM »
Quote
PL Gupta in his book 'Coins' lists this coin as a silver rupee (catalog 272). This is now a question mark to me. If Gupta is right then this should be a genuine coin.
Dear Islam, you should have observed that the coin depicted by PL Gupta is a gold mohur and of different and much more decent calligraphy as the token shown above. In my reply I pointed out that coins of Akbar were very popular as religious amulet and particular the type as shown by PL Gupta as #272 was imitated the most. As an authentic issue this type is only found in gold and of either Ahmadabad, Lahore or Urdu-Zafar-Qarin mint. Any issue of this type in another metal is an imitation.

Offline Md. Shariful Islam

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Re: Akbar Temple Token
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2011, 07:45:04 PM »
Many thanks for the clarification sir....

Islam