Sher Shah Suri (AH945-952/AD1538-1545), the Lion King: Paisa

Started by Rangnath, September 08, 2007, 01:22:13 AM

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Rangnath

This looks particularly difficult to read.  One side is mostly ruined. But the other is clear enough; but the designer seemed to take liberties with Up and Down.
It weighs 19.6 grams and is almost 24 mm across. 
It appears to be copper.
richie

Oesho

This is a AE paisa of Sher Shah Suri (AH945-952/AD1538-1545).
Despite the obv. is completely obliterated its needs to be turned 180 degrees. The reverse bears the name of the ruler, mint and date, but in this case nothing can be made out of it.
The reverse reads: Fi 'ahd al-Amir al-Hami al-Din al-Dayyan (in the time of the Amir, the protector of the religion of the judge of good and evil) The first part (Fi 'ahd al-Amir al-Hami) is enclosed within a square, with the rest of the legend in the margin.

Rangnath

Thanks so much Oesho! 
After reading, I can see that Sher shah was much more than an interlude before the great Mughal Empire.
In some ways, he seems to have been Akbar's equal and with luck, it might have been Sher Shah's Pashtuns that had the lasting dynasty over most of Inida.
I found the following particularly relevant:

"Sher Shah Suri was a visionary ruler and introduced many military and civil reforms. One of his important innovations was the introduction of the Rupayya or rupee coin in place of ?Tanka? and ?Jeetal? that were introduced by Turks.; the same name is still used for official coinage in Pakistan, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Mauritius, Maldives, Seychelles among other countries. He was the first in South Asia to introduce custom duties, which are still followed up to this day. He undertook extensive repairs of major roads and for travellers' comfort constructed resthouses and places for drinking-water along the road

Richie

Oesho

Despite the obv. is completely obliterated its needs to be turned 180 degrees. The reverse bears the name of the ruler, mint and date, but in this case nothing can be made out of it.
I made an mistake in my earlier message the reverse in the above sentence, should be  read as obverse.

Your observations regarding Sher Shah Suri are absolutely correct. He was a great administrator and reformer. The Mughal successors under Akbar took great advantage of Sher Shah's civil reforms which they happily adopted. This was an important aspect of the Mughal success in building an Empire in India.

Rangnath

Before your identification, this coin was no better than a fishing weight. Thanks to you, I now own a  wonderful coin. Thank you once again.
richie