Author Topic: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk  (Read 4561 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« on: August 26, 2010, 05:59:26 PM »
This is a coin of superlatives. It is probably the heaviest circulation coin in my collection: 50.8 grams. Imagine having 20 of these coins (one rouble) in your pockets: that's over a kilogram of copper. It's too large to fit in a standard coin carton (43 mm) and so thick that the edge shows on the scan (4 mm). Yet, it is sharply struck and well centered.

I don't care for the spoilt-brat arguments of coins being "too heavy". A heavy coin is a joy to behold and to hold in your hand.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2010, 06:21:08 PM »
To put the hulk in perspective, here is its alternative. Same denomination and circulating side by side. My copy is 0.9 gram and 15 mm. Twenty of these coins would weigh less than half of their copper brother. I am sure today's spoilt brats would have whined that it is too small. I think it's cute.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2010, 11:20:24 PM »
I do love large copper coins.  I have a 10-kopeck of 1833, though I suspect it's about the same size as your earlier 5.  It has a hardly noticeable (in context) chip in the reverse that would have split a smaller coin in half.


Offline andyg

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2010, 11:36:10 PM »
I've always had a soft spot for those Russian coppers,
This one is an even bigger monster at 66g
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline Gagarin_Andrey

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2010, 03:08:39 PM »
there were almost more heavy coppers, like the rouble of Sestroretsk, weight more than a kilo of copper...
Interests: Eastern Europe Middle Ages coins

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2010, 03:24:03 PM »
Never heard of that piece, so I looked it up. Sestroretsk is in the vicinity of Saint Petersburg. Do you have the complete "edge inscription"?

Russia. Sestroretsk Ruble, 1771. Br-317, Bitkin-880. Novodel. 1030.6 grams. 75.9 mm wide and 26.8 mm thick from a first type sawed planchet. (Source: Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc.)

Impressive piece, but only a handful (so to speak) are known and - being a novodel - it didn't circulate.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gagarin_Andrey

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2010, 03:48:04 PM »
he edge description:
СЕСТРОРЕЦКОГО МОНЕТНОГО ДВОРА
(" [of] the Sestroretsk mint")

but it seems to be not the haviest one
see more
http://www.numizmat-online.ru/content/1-rubl-plata-1725-g-moneta-obraztsa-1725-1726-gg
Interests: Eastern Europe Middle Ages coins

My articles about numismatics
https://independent.academia.edu/AndreiBoikoGagarin

Offline Figleaf

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2010, 05:25:11 PM »
Thanks, Andrey. This is copper plate money, a different class of things altogether, also issued in Sweden.

Here's an interesting one. My (now humble) 5 kopeck of 50.8 grams (1016 grams to the silver ruble) maintains practically the same copper/silver ratio as the Sestroretsk ruble (1030 grams to the silver ruble), although there are 30 years between them. I wonder if this equivalent was maintained all that time and why Martin's 1833 coin seems to have a much lower copper content. My coin of this type is 41.5 grams, so only 415 grams of copper in a silver ruble. Since the rubles have remained the same, I presume copper was revalued in silver terms by a whopping 60%. I wonder if this has anything to do with Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812. I presume copper prices would have risen considerably, as copper is quite useful in warfare as cannons and cannon balls.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 31, 2010, 12:10:35 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2010, 01:16:19 AM »
he edge description:
СЕСТРОРЕЦКОГО МОНЕТНОГО ДВОРА
(" [of] the Sestroretsk mint")


Minor correction:

СЕСТРОРЕЦКAГО, and presumably also МОНЕТНAГО.  Pre-1918 spelling - the A is visible in the left-hand photo :-)

Offline gxseries

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Re: S & T The Russian answer to the Hulk
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2010, 07:15:56 PM »
My 1769 EM 5 kopek weighs at 76.4 grams. Yes, you read it right, 76.4 grams. Heavier than an average Siberian 10 kopek which is around 60grams and 50% more generous than an average 5 kopek which is supposed to be around 50 grams.



You can see that it's 5.5-6mm thick.