Author Topic: Raymond Joly  (Read 7576 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Raymond Joly
« on: August 18, 2010, 03:08:21 AM »
Raymond Charles Joly-Clare was born on 4th February 1911 in Paris, the youngest of four children in a single parent family. At age 9, he was an orphan and the best in his class in art. He suffered from anemia, so in 1924 it was decided to put him in a school in the country, where the air would be better. In 1926 he got a place in the school of the chamber of commerce as apprentice-bronze cutter. After one year of schooling, he was the best in his class. Afterwards, he followed some courses to become a goldsmith. In 1929 he landed his first job as an apprentice in an art workshop, where the head of the workshop taught him hollow engraving.

In 1932 he was drafted into military service and found to be a no-good soldier, unable even to march. He was put to work at the military museum "Invalides" in Paris as a draftsman of posters. In 1933 he returned to his job, but the head of the workshop had left to become a teacher in a school that trained many engravers for the Paris Mint. After two years of unemployment, Joly got a job as an engraver for the Paris mint in 1937.

In 1942, he received the premier grand prix de Rome, a very prestigious art prize. He spent the rest of the second world war in Rome, getting an education in general arts. He returned to Paris in 1946 and set up his own workshop. Orders were coming from all sides, including the Paris mint and he cut a large number of medals. His specialty was to engrave directly in steel.

In 1957, Lucien Bazor decided to retire as chief engraver of the Paris Mint. A few months later, in January 1958, Joly was appointed as his successor. He chose an owl as his sign. He later explaine that he had chosen the owl because he won the prix de Rome with a statue of Athena. He engraved the mark himself, directly on steel, which made the sign more detailed than usual.

His first assignment was a big one: to design the coins of the new Franc in 1959. He oversaw the creation of four designs for the new series: hiw own design of an ear of wheat with innovative lettering for the stainless steel 1, 2 and 5 centimes (the 1 centimes was of too little value to see much use, the 2 centimes was not put in circulation, the 5 centimes was replaced in 1966 as its cost of production was too high) Marianne (designed by Lagriffoul) for the 5, 10, 20 and 50 centimes (the 5 was added later, the 50 was replaced by a half franc as it was confused with the 20), a re-worked old design by Oscar Roty of the sower for the half franc, 1 franc, 2 and 5 francs and another re-worked old design of Hercules and the graces for the 10, 20 and 50 francs, most of which saw little circulation.

Joly signed a number of coins for other countries. These are:
  • 1966-70 New Hebrides, coins of 1 F, 2 F 5 F, 10 F, 20 F, 50 F, and 100 F
  • 1961-74 West African States, coins of 100 F, 500 F and 5 000 F
  • 1965-76 French Polynesia, coins of 10 F, 20 F, 50 and 100 F (KM 14, after retiring)
  • 1967-75 New Caldonia, coins of 10 F, 20 F, 50 F and 100 F
  • 1970-75 French Afars and Issas, coins of 50 F and 100 F
  • 1970-74 Madagascar, coins of 10 F and 20 F
  • 1971 Monaco, Prince Rainier III, coin of 5 F
  • 1971 Gabon, Visit of President Georges Pompidou, coin of 5000 F
  • 1972 Brazil, 150th anniversary of indépendance, coins of 1, 20 et 300 Cruzeiros
  • 1977 Djibouti, coins of 50 F and 100 F (unsigned, after retirement)

Other work during his tenure incuded swords of honour for new members of the Académie Française. He received a number of decorations: Knight in the Légion d’Honneur, Officer of the National order of merit and Officer of Arts and letters.

Joly retired in 1974, but he was still receiving orders for coins and medals afterwards. He accepted some he liked and dabbled in other art forms, such as sculpture, engraving in slate and painting on glass. He died on 18th June 2006, 95 years old, having created over 500 medals in his lifetime, often signed with the same owl he used for the coins he designed.

Peter
« Last Edit: December 14, 2019, 10:18:47 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Raymond Joly
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2010, 07:17:21 PM »


Here are some of his French Polynesia and New Caledonia coins below.
(The bottom row shows coins from Vanuatu, successor state to the New Hebrides, which were NOT designed by him).



 
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 04:08:45 PM by <k> »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Raymond Joly
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2010, 09:33:16 PM »
Maybe someone could post Joly's 1 and 5 centimes France and his Brazilian commemorative side by side. One was made when he'd just started as chief engraver, the other after retirement. There is a similarity in style, but also a development between the two. I can contribute with the non-issued 2 centimes, borrowed from CGB.

Thanks for the pics, E.M.U. On all the pics of Joly at work I have seen, he looks very happy. On this one, he is applying his favourite technique: hammering directly on steel.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Raymond Joly
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2010, 06:48:42 PM »
Maybe someone could post Joly's 1 and 5 centimes France and his Brazilian commemorative side by side. There is a similarity in style, but also a development between the two.

Can you elaborate on that, Figleaf?







Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Raymond Joly
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2010, 07:09:07 PM »
Excellent, E.M.U.! Thank you very much.

Both show the influence of Joly's direct engraving style and I wouldn't be surprised if he designed both on steel. There is no attempt to add depth, either by shadow or by relief on both coins. Joly wants your brain to add it for you and it does. Have you seen the backs of the two heads? Of course, but they are not there. Do you know that the eye is closer than the nose? Sure, but they are engraved on the same level. Do you know that the ear of wheat is oval? Yes, but on the coin it is flat.

There is also development. The fine, regular script font on the French coin is eminently readable and breaks, no, it crashes the impression of an impersonal, robot-made design. Human at work. I can't think of another coin with a legend in script. On the Brazil coin, Joly plays with the idea of morphing one date into another and letting the eye do the work again. Great idea, but it doesn't work. One of the dates remains unclear and the movement is not achieved. By contrast, letting the faces look at BRASIL does work.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Coinsforever

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Re: Raymond Joly
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2011, 01:45:47 PM »
Interesting & knowledgeable story of Engraver ,   much passionate about his work with limited resources .

Skillful job
Cheers ;D 
Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Raymond Joly
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2011, 12:56:17 PM »
AFAIK, Joly is the last engraver who worked directly on steel. See this thread and this one for more information.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.