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Nawanagar KM2, Dokdo 1570-1850(?)

Started by Rangnath, August 10, 2007, 04:17:03 PM

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Rangnath

Having a scale helps. It was the weight, 7.7 grams, and size, 16 mm, that allowed me to ID this as a Dokdo.  It is either a KM 2 (variation) or it is not listed; take your pick.  Personally, I like being able to write down a number!

But the date bothers me:  1570 to 1850!  That is quite a spread of years. 

On the reverse, a reference is made to Muzaffar Shah and Shri Jam.  Shri Jam is the title of the ruler of Nawanagar.  Most coins from 1570 on refer to Muzaffar Shah.  Who was he?
richie

BC Numismatics

The name 'Muzaffar Shah' is that of Muzaffar III of Gujarat (ruled 1560-73).This is also inscribed on coins of Porbandar as well.

Aidan.

Rangnath

Thank you Aidan.  I made note of that.  Richie

Figleaf

#3
I have been unable to find the complete name and titles of Muzaffar, but I hit upon Nawanagar's only claim to greatness: Lieutenant General Maharaja Jam Shri Sir Digvijaysinhji Ranjitsinhji Jadeja, GCIE, KCSI, ADC, Maharaja Jam Saheb of Nawanagar. Cricket types seem to love him and historians seem to hate him. Maybe sports and history are incompatible?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

Ah, yes. I read the article. 
Another of my cricket heroes knocked off his pedestal. 
That does bring Nawanagar to life.
richie

BC Numismatics

Richie,K.S. Ranjitsinghji was the most famous of all the Indian princely state rulers who played cricket.Even as late as 20 or 30 years ago,there was Indian royalty playing cricket for the Indian national cricket squad.

Cricket is actually my favourite sport,even though I haven't played it for years.In India (& the other British Commonwealth member states in that part of the world!),cricket is almost like a religion.

Aidan.

BC Numismatics

Richie,
  The '1570' is actually a frozen date.Both the Nawanagari & Porbandari coins are very similar to one another in terms of their design.I think that Kutch also had similarly-designed coins prior to its modern issues as well.

Aidan.

Oesho

The coins of Nawanagar, Porbandar and the early issues of Kutch, can be distinguished by the Nagari legend on them.
The coins of Nawanagar reads Shri Jam, those of Porbandar Sri Rana and on the issues of Kutch, as a rule, the actual name of the ruler. The coin as shown above is missing the Nagari legend, but as Porbandar didn't issue any copper (as far as we know) and the fabric of the Kutch coins is different, it must no doubt be an issue of Nawanagar.
Besides the name Muzaffar Shah Sultan, it has also a frozen date 978. The coins were issued over a long period of time and became pretty crude (like the above coin). Similar types are missing the Nagari legend, but having a VS date instead. These coins are known with dates from VS1909 (=AD1852) to VS1919 (=AD1862).
Probably soon after, decent copper coins of the same type were struck by machinery.

Oesho

#8
Quote from: Oesho on November 21, 2008, 11:37:38 PM
The coin as shown above is missing the Nagari legend, but as Porbandar didn't issue any copper (as far as we know) and the fabric of the Kutch coins is different, it must no doubt be an issue of Nawanagar.
Porbandar did issue copper coins, Sorry for the error
I will add some images of the various issues.

KM#3, Dhinglo or 1 1/2 Dokda, crude style ca. AD1570-1850

KM#8, Dhinglo or 1 1/2 Dokda, finer style ca. AD1850

KM#14, Dokdo, ND, Vibhaji (VS1909-1951/AD1852-1894)

KM#16, Dokdo, VS1919 (=AD1862), Vibhaji (VS1909-1951/AD1852-1894)

KM#19, 3 Dokda, VS1942 (=AD1885), Vibhaji (VS1909-1951/AD1852-1894)
Still the Muzaffar Shah legend is found on the coin.

Rangnath

Thanks so much for this series.
A cursory glance at a coin from Nawanagar or Kutch or Porbandar can get me into trouble. I appreciate the difference between Sri Jam (though a false cognate, it has an appealing sound in English.  8) ), Sri Rana or the name of the ruler, on some degraded coins or on some coins in which the legend is not well centered, I have difficulty.
On the three dokdo of 1885, there are repeated Rosettes of 7 dots.  Are those significant?  Can they alone be used to differentiate a Nawanagari coin from one of its neighbors?
The Katar on that same coin is different in type than that which appears on any coin from Kutch. Can one use the Katar types to differentiate a Nawanagari coin from one of its neighbors?
richie

Rangnath

#10
I think it appropriate to add this coin to this thread.  I'll split it later, should that become a better alternative.

Safe to say, this coin is either from Nawanagar or Porbandar.  Only a little of the Nagari is in evidence.  On the basis of what is there, can we make an attribution?
richie