AZORES - The 1887 GP crowned counterstamp

Started by AZislands, February 05, 2010, 12:17:53 AM

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AZislands

Often we noticed the appearance of coins with counterstamps GP crowned with modern manufacturing, an imitation of the counterstamp of the Azores in 1887, leading some people to naively buy such pieces as if they were authentic.

Ever since long it has circulated in the Azores foreign coins due to the shortage of Portuguese coins. The constant lack of coins also contributed to the existence, at the time, of a lot of counterfeit coins.

The law of 31 March of 1887, with ordered silver foreign coins to be counterstamped , was intended to regulate the coin stock, legalizing the good coin by putting the GP crowned counterstamp for improved confidence in the coin and so, with the coin legalized through the counterstamp it could now be used in government payments.


DESCRIPTION OF THE GP CROWNED COUNTERSTAMP  OF THE AZORES

Some authors consider the existence of three slightly different impressions:

Type I - crown with  rosettes topped by the cross.
Type II - crown with  rosettes topped by the sphere.
Type III – crown without rosettes topped by the sphere..

The first type is characterized by a thin traced circle with about 8.5 mm in diameter containing the letters GP, topped by a crown with 5 visible pearled arches, and internally covered with rosettes in the form of a clover in a perfectly smooth and non granular field.
On the reversed side you can see a strong circular worn out part in the opposite direction to the counterstamp.




As for the the second and third types I have some doubt of its authenticity, so I'd consider only the first type as genuine.




The law that determines the stamping refers only to foreign silver coins, however, one can consider the counterstamps in portuguese silver and copper coins as genuine.



DESCRIPTION OF THE FAKE COUNTERSTAMPS

Today we rarely find counterfeit counterstamps of the time and therefore are much appreciated. They usually appear on also false or questionable coins.



The modern counterfeit counterstamps abound in huge variety and quantity and have no numismatic value, they are just curious, unfortunately they are the ones that most appear on the market. So far we have identified about 20 of these counterstamps, which are basically identical to the original, crowned GP within a circle, but have completely different styles. Many of these counterstamps have originated from Brazil and Spain.



Finally we still have to consider modern counterfeit counterstamps, which have the same style as the original. They are usually in good coins and are easily recognised by its rough appearance. They are possibly counterstamps that are copied from genuine counterstamps.



M. Rodrigues

Figleaf

Thank you for making this great information available, AZislands. Often, it is more difficult to get good information on imitations than on genuine coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Afrasi

Many Thanks! I made copies of your articles in the Portuguese forum, but this is much more practically, because it is concentrated in one view, and it is updated. One of these faked countermarks looks very familiar to me.  ;) Am I right?

Afrasi


AZislands

Quote from: Afrasi on February 06, 2010, 01:43:13 AM
... One of these faked countermarks looks very familiar to me.  ;) Am I right?

Right!  :) I know that counterstamp, the penultimate of the fakes counterstamps list, only in portuguese copper coin, I think it´s a fake, maybe old, made in Portugal.



M. Rodrigues

lusomosa

I does look fake to me,  the G and the P looks quite wierd...

LP

RVCOINS

Nice section with very useful information.

It is nice to know that you have a good one in the collection. ( c/m crowned GP on a Dutch Guilder of 1848 )

regards

Roland

AZislands

#7
Quote from: RVCOINS on February 23, 2010, 12:15:44 PM
...( c/m crowned GP on a Dutch Guilder of 1848 )

I don't have in my collection and neither do I know of any Dutch coin with the GP counterstamp of the Azores, there could be some but then they would very rare.

For your viewing pleasure, here's a coin with an interesting route:

- Azores 1200 Reis. The Law of March 31, 1887.
- Portugal 870 Reis. The Law of September 1, 1834.
- Mexico 8 Reales of 1821.




M. Rodrigues

RVCOINS

I know two Dutch coins with this countermark.

Dutch Guilder 1848 ( In my own collection )
Dutch 2 1/2 Guilder 1870

Roland

Figleaf

I would be extremely interested in seeing the coin from your own collection, RV. Is it possible for you to post it here?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

RVCOINS

HI Peter,

The collection is on a safe place. I will see if i have a picture somewhere.
The coin is mentioned in the "Munten en bankbiljetten Encyclopedie part 3"

Both coins where sold by Rondomons, The Rijksdaalder of 1870 was too expensive at that time.

Roland