Author Topic: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals  (Read 10657 times)

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constanius

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British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« on: January 27, 2010, 10:34:33 PM »


The Mond Nickel Company Ltd, undated, struck from 99.9% pure nickel for the British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 45mm by PM (Percy Metcalfe 1895-1970) unlisted in BHM.
Obv:  Britannia helmeted right, holding trident, below, part of a globe featuring a deer(springbok?), beaver, kangaroo and tiger,(for South Africa, Canada, Australia & India)
Rev:  THE/ MOND / NICKEL / COMPANY / LTD / NICKEL 99.9% plain edge.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2014, 08:28:33 PM by andyg »

constanius

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2010, 10:41:10 PM »

THE BRITISH EMPIRE EXHIBITION 1924 BHM# 4194. 28mm AE. CC. by W. McMillan
Obv. Head of Mercury, left. COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY.
Rev. A crane above a steamship. THE BRITISH EMPIRE EXHIBITION 1924
This medal was struck at the Royal Mint stand at the exhibition. It was one of the so-called 'keep-sake' medals and cost 6d. This medal was also the runner-up in the competition for a commemorative piece for the exhibition.

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2010, 12:14:54 AM »
In the first (Mond) one, your 'globe' is probably Britannia's shield.

I particularly like the Royal Mint one, the reverse really says "commerce and industry".   Both sides are really well executed and it is unusual to find an artist who can achieve success with portraits and enginering subjects.

Lovely exhibits.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

constanius

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2010, 04:28:08 AM »
In the first (Mond) one, your 'globe' is probably Britannia's shield.

I particularly like the Royal Mint one, the reverse really says "commerce and industry".   Both sides are really well executed and it is unusual to find an artist who can achieve success with portraits and enginering subjects.

Lovely exhibits.

Bill.

Thanks Bill, I agree with you about the shield but the Obv. Head of Mercury, left. COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY is a direct quote from Brown's BHM#4194 & one that I accept as the correct notation.

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2010, 04:50:41 AM »
What I really meant to say is that the ship etc. really depicts the subject of commerce and industry.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2010, 01:00:01 PM »
I find the obverse of the "Mond" medal surprisingly good! The style is typical of the thirties, so on this medal, it is "avant garde". I would see it as a mixture of classicism (classical Greek influences), faux medieval and modernist, resulting in a creative rendering of a familiar theme.

Just for the fun of it, the ship on the second medal shows a remarkable resemblance to the "Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse", a bit unexpected after the first world war...

Peter
« Last Edit: January 28, 2010, 05:24:54 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

constanius

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2010, 05:04:26 PM »
What I really meant to say is that the ship etc. really depicts the subject of commerce and industry.

Bill.

I almost added to my post "am I misunderstanding your point" & obviously I was.  Now I see you said the "the reverse really says "commerce and industry".  Sorry Bill.

translateltd

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2010, 10:42:42 PM »
I've now found the other Metcalfe example that I mentioned here a few weeks ago: http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,5356.0.html

It's 27.5mm, bronze, and looks like some eejit has polished it ...


Offline Figleaf

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2010, 11:11:26 PM »
Another great one from Mr. Metcalfe. My respect for him is still growing. Have you tried the universal recipe of a long soak in olive oil on this one?

(noting "eejit" in little black book) :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2010, 12:24:04 AM »
Another great one from Mr. Metcalfe. My respect for him is still growing. Have you tried the universal recipe of a long soak in olive oil on this one?


Not sure the olive oil trick would work, as the surface appears to have suffered some smoothing in the polishing process, unfortunately.

Offline constanius

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2014, 07:53:03 PM »


Another medal by Percy Metcalfe, this one is for Noble Industries, first struck dated 1924 is BHM#4195 CC.
This, dated 1925 is BHM#4204 C. AE 37mm. Struck at the Exhibition, the planchets had been chemically treated prior to striking to give a colourising effect. This example looks far better in the hand as you can tilt it and the full beauty becomes clear(difficult to show in a pic), sadly most of these that you see for sale have lost their original lustre, this one retains it.


Silver BHM#4192
Obv. Britannia seated right striking a coin. BRITANNIA MONETA(British Mint).
Rev. View of the mint London. .THE. .ROYAL. .MINT. .LONDON.
AR CC; AE CC. 36mm. Designed by John Langford Jones. Both the silver & bronze were struck with a matt finish.
Though the medals themselves give no clue as to why or when they were struck, they were struck at the Royal Mint stand at the British Empire Exhibition in 1924 & 1925. 2,402 were struck in 1924 & a further 122 in 1925, these numbers are for both the bronze & silver combined. The bronze sold for 1s/6d and the 1 troy ounce of .925 silver for 3s/6d.
The obverse image has since been used for various Mint trial dies, which sometimes leads even dealers to mislist these 1924/25 exhibition medals as trial pieces,

Pat

Offline malj1

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2014, 09:25:37 AM »
I did a double-take on your description of it being in silver, my piece, somewhat scruffy, didn't have the appearance of silver at first sight but looking at this again today I now agree and have adjusted the page here to suit.  :o





Here are my two pieces from that page. The silver is 30.6g.

Thanks too for correctly attributing these, I shall now remember for ever after.  ;D


Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline constanius

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2014, 07:40:57 PM »
I did a double-take on your description of it being in silver, my piece, somewhat scruffy, didn't have the appearance of silver at first sight but looking at this again today I now agree and have adjusted the page

Thanks too for correctly attributing these, I shall now remember for ever after.  ;D

"Scruffy might just be hiding silver" versus  "all that glitters is not gold"  ;)

My pleasure Malcolm, it is nice feeling to be the bearer of good news :)

Pat

Pat

Offline malj1

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2014, 09:00:14 AM »
One that I had forgotten:



Bronze 51mm., British Exhibition 1924 with George V bust etc. in case of issue.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2017, 11:58:51 PM by eurocoin »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Manzikert

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Re: British Empire Exhibition 1924-1925 Medals
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2017, 12:28:05 PM »
Another souvenir struck at the Wembley Exhibition was a replica of an Alfred the Great penny, which has appeared elsewhere http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,5356.msg33309.html#msg33309

I have had one of these for many years, but recently got another, of a slightly different type, and thought it might be appropriate to post both of them here.

An interesting account was published as part of an article by Christopher Eimer in the BNJ in 1985 on the medal in inter-war Britain, and I quote:

 'The central feature of the Mint exhibit was an illustration of minting, including that of a replica King Alfred penny in tin (no. 8 ), struck by men in Saxon costume and employing traditional methods of production.

Even this innocent diversion drew Johnson into a squabble when, on 20 May 1924, a question was raised in Parliament by Professor Charles Oman, asking the chancellor whether he realised that those Alfred pennies differed little from  the  originals.

  On 21 May, Johnson gave a written reply to Oman expressing his sorrow that Oman should have classed him with Becker the forger, and insisting that 'the facsimilies [had] received the approval of the British Museum ... No doubt  [he  continued] the size of the coin is that of the London silver penny but ... the metal is tin ... [and] I can hardly imagine a coin collector who was such a mug as not to look  pretty narrowly through a glass at a coin in so fine a  condition'.

  After further discussions between Johnson, the Treasury and George Brooke at the British Museum, the matter was finally resolved by the preparation of different dies, and a new moneyer, Philip at Wembley, was  'discovered' (no.  9).  In the event, this particular gimmick had proved reasonably popular, and more than ten thousand pieces were sold at sixpence each.'

My original is of the first type, and the new one is of the second type, with the PHILIP AET WEMBLEY signature, which is a reference to Philip Snowden, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, who of course was ex-officio Master of the Mint.

Looking at mine and a couple of pictures on the web it appears that only a new reverse die was made, as both of mine seem to be from the same obverse die (which had been discreetly dated '1924' on the shoulder of the bust anyway).

Now I just have to find a better example of the original type (mine is rather worn and has damage to the reverse).

Alan

[Edit] It is always unwise to make sweeping statements, and glancing at this post to look for any errors it became obvious that the obverse die of the 'original' type has a prominent 'T' on the chest (though the small details of the lettering are identical) so presumably was reengraved at some time: I will have to dig deeper.