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Laos: coinage of 1980

Started by <k>, April 09, 2022, 08:15:44 PM

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<k>

From Wikipedia:

Laos, officially the Lao People's Democratic Republic, is a socialist state and the only landlocked country in Southeast Asia. It is located at the heart of the Indochinese Peninsula. Its capital and largest city is Vientiane. It has a population of around 7.25 million.

Present-day Laos traces its historic and cultural identity to Lan Xang, which existed from the 14th century to the 18th century as one of the largest kingdoms in Southeast Asia. Because of its central geographical location in Southeast Asia, the kingdom became a hub for overland trade and became wealthy economically and culturally. After a period of internal conflict, Lan Xang broke into three separate kingdoms—Luang Phrabang, Vientiane, and Champasak. In 1893 the three territories came under a French protectorate and were united to form what is now known as Laos.

It briefly gained independence in 1945 after Japanese occupation but was re-colonised by France until it won autonomy in 1949. Laos became independent in 1953, with a constitutional monarchy under King Sisavang Vong. A post-independence civil war began, which saw the communist resistance, supported by the Soviet Union, fight against the monarchy that later came under influence of military regimes supported by the United States. After the Vietnam War ended in 1975, the communist Pathet Lao came to power, ending the civil war. Laos was then dependent on military and economic aid from the Soviet Union until its dissolution in 1991.

Laos is a member of the Asia-Pacific Trade Agreement, the ASEAN, East Asia Summit, and La Francophonie. Laos applied for membership of the World Trade Organization in 1997; on 2 February 2013, it was granted full membership. It is a one-party socialist republic, espousing Marxism–Leninism and governed by the Lao People's Revolutionary Party, under which non-governmental organisations have routinely characterised the country's human rights record as poor, citing repeated abuses such as torture, restrictions on civil liberties, and persecution of minorities.

The politically and culturally dominant Lao people make up 53.2% of the population, mostly in the lowlands. Mon-Khmer groups, the Hmong, and other indigenous hill tribes live in the foothills and mountains. Laos's strategies for development are based on generating electricity from rivers and selling the power to its neighbours, namely Thailand, China, and Vietnam, as well as its initiative to become a "land-linked" nation, as evidenced by the construction of four new railways connecting Laos and neighbours. Laos has been referred to as one of Southeast Asia and Pacific's fastest growing economies by the World Bank, with annual GDP growth averaging 7.4% since 2009.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The location of Laos within south-east Asia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Map of Laos.jpg

Map of Laos.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Flag of Laos.png


From Wikipedia:

The current flag of Laos was first adopted in 1945 under the short-lived Lao Issara government of 1945–46, then by the Pathet Lao. It is one of the two flags of a currently communist country (the other being Cuba) that currently does not use any communist symbolism. The current flag was adopted on December 2, 1975, when it became a socialist state.

According to the original creator of the current Lao flag, Maha Sila Viravong, the white disk in the center symbolizes the unity of the Lao people (and the future reunification of the two Laotian regions of Laos and Northeastern Thailand that are divided by the Mekong River) under one nation. It is also said to represent a full moon against the Mekong River. The red stripes stand for the blood shed by the Lao people on both banks of the Mekong River (the multi-ethnic people of Laos and the Isan people of Northeastern Thailand) in their struggle for freedom and independence from the French, and the blue symbolizes the Mekong River itself, a symbol of the nation's prosperity.
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<k>

#4
Emblem of Laos-1975-1991.jpg


The national emblem of Laos from 1975 to 1991.

It featured a road, a paddy field, a forest and a hydroelectric dam.

At the top were the communist symbols of a star and a hammer and sickle.

At the bottom was a partial cog wheel.

The emblem included crescent-shaped stalks of fully ripened rice
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<k>

From Wikipedia:

The kip is the currency of Laos since 1955. Historically, one kip was divided into 100 att. The name kip derives from a Lao word meaning "ingot."

In 1980 coins were again issued in Laos for the first time in 28 years, with denominations of 10, 20 and 50 att, with each being struck in aluminum and depicting the state emblem on the obverse and agricultural themes on the reverse. However, due to the economic toll of the Soviet collapse in 1991 and the persistence of chronic inflation, coins are rarely seen in circulation nowadays.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
Laos 20 att 1980-.jpg


The coins issued in 1980 were all made of aluminium.

They all carried the same obverse design of the national emblem.

Only the obverse of the 20 att coin is shown here.
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<k>

#7
Laos 10 att 1980.jpg


Numista N# 5531.

The 10 att coin had a diameter of 21 mm and weighed 1.2 grams.

The reverse design showed a peasant woman and bundles of rice stalks.
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<k>

#8
Laos 20 att 1980.jpg


Numista N# 4319.

The 20 att coin had a diameter of 23 mm and weighed 1.55 grams.

The reverse design showed a man ploughing a paddy field with an ox.
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<k>

#9
Laos 50 att 1980.jpg


Numista N# 5532.

The 50 att coin was the highest denomination of the series.

It had a diameter of 26 mm and weighed 2.5 grams.

The reverse design featured a tilapia fish flanked by date palm trees.
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<k>

That finished my topic.

Does anybody know what the motifs on the 20 att coin are supposed to represent? They flank the numerals of the denomination.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

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Figleaf

The decorations on both sides of the 20 att are the flames (?) of the Naga, a deity that is half human, half serpent. The Naga is a national symbol of Laos.

Peter

Naga.JPG
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.