Author Topic: The final coin series of Yugoslavia  (Read 263 times)

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Offline <k>

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The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« on: August 23, 2020, 12:48:27 AM »
In 1991, Croatia, Slovenia, and the Republic of Macedonia declared independence from Yugoslavia. In March 1992 Bosnia-Herzegovina also declared independence from Yugoslavia.

After the breakup of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, only the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Montenegro were left. On 28 April 1992, they formed the new state of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Its aspirations to be the sole legal successor state to SFR Yugoslavia were not recognised by the United Nations, which affirmed that the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia had ceased to exist and that the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was merely a breakaway state. However, the government of Slobodan Milošević opposed any such claims, and as such Yugoslavia was not allowed to join the United Nations.

Years later, Milošević resigned from the Yugoslav presidency amid demonstrations following the disputed presidential election of 24 September 2000, and he was arrested by Yugoslav federal authorities on 31 March 2001 on suspicion of corruption, abuse of power, and embezzlement.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2020, 12:49:59 AM »


Map of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in the year 2000.

Yugoslavia is shown in pink.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2020, 12:54:34 AM »



From Wikipedia:

The flag of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a horizontal tricolour of blue (top), white (middle) and red (bottom). The design and colours were based on the Pan-Slavic flag adopted at the Pan-Slavic Congress of 1848, in Prague. Following the end of the First World War in 1918, the Southern Slavs united into a single unitary state of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, later known as Yugoslavia. The monarchy selected the pan-Slavic design to symbolise the new founded unity of all Southern Slavs.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2020, 12:58:34 AM »



From Wikipedia:

The coat of arms of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia consisted of a shield with the Serbian eagle (a white double-headed eagle adopted from the Nemanjić dynasty), and within that a shield with a quartering of the Serbian cross (or cross with firesteels) and the Montenegrin lion passant.

The coat of arms was designed after the breakup of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, to symbolise the new union consisting only of Serbia and Montenegro. Its design thus features the traditional heraldic elements connected historically with both countries.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2020, 01:03:14 AM »
On 6 November 1999, Montenegro decided that, besides the Yugoslav dinar, the Deutsche Mark would also be an official currency. On 13 November 2000, the dinar was dropped in Montenegro and the Deutsche Mark (by that time defined in terms of the euro) became the only currency there.

On 15 December 2000 the new democratic government of Yugoslavia nonetheless issued a new coin series of the Yugoslav dinar. Although still called the Yugoslav dinar, it was now only used within Serbia.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2020, 01:05:19 AM »



The lowest denomination of the new coin series was the brass 50 para coin. The dinar was subdivided into 100 para.


The obverse design showed a female allegory of the country. The reverse showed the coat of arms above the denomination.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2020, 01:10:23 AM »



The 1 dinar coin was issued from 2000 to 2002. It was made of nickel-brass.

The reverse design featured the building of the National Bank of Yugoslavia.



The image seen above is courtesy of coinz.eu.

The site is well worth a visit. It famously insists that every coin has three sides, not just two.

It therefore always shows the third side, namely the edge.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2020, 01:13:18 AM »



The building of the National Bank of Yugoslavia.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2020, 01:26:02 AM »



The 2 dinara coin was made of nickel-brass.

The obverse showed the coat of arms.


The coin was issued from 2000 to 2002.

Like all the coins of the series, it used both the Latin and the Cyrillic alphabet.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2020, 01:28:53 AM »



The reverse of the 2 dinara coin featured the Gračanica Monastery.

A surprising number of the coins of former communist states feature religious themes.

Religion was largely suppressed under communism.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2020, 01:32:22 AM »


The Gračanica monastery.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2020, 01:44:33 AM »



The nickel-brass 5 dinara coin was the highest denomination of the series.


The obverse design of the 5 dinara coin was the same as that of the 2 dinara coin.

The reverse design showed the Yugoslav Parliament building.


Notice how the numeral '5' obscures part of the building.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2020, 01:48:20 AM »


The Yugoslav Parliament building.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2020, 01:54:43 AM »
Apart from the 50 para, then, which was issued in the year 2000 only, the series was issued from 2000 to 2002. The designs were attractive and not something one would have expected from Yugoslavia. Some of them were carried forward onto the later Serbian dinar, where the architectural theme was continued.
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Re: The final coin series of Yugoslavia
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2020, 01:58:55 AM »
From Wikipedia:

In 2002, Serbia and Montenegro came to a new agreement regarding continued co-operation. On 4 February 2003, the Federal Assembly of Yugoslavia created a loose state union or confederacy—the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro, although Yugoslavia was still commonly used. A new constitutional charter was agreed to provide a framework for the governance of the country.

On 21 May 2006, Montenegrins voted in an independence referendum, with 55.5% supporting independence. Fifty-five percent or more of affirmative votes were needed to dissolve the confederation and Yugoslavia. The turnout was 86.3% and 99.73% of the more than 477,000 votes cast were deemed valid.

The subsequent Montenegrin proclamation of independence on 3 June 2006 and the Serbian proclamation of independence on 5 June ended the confederation of Serbia and Montenegro and thus the last remaining vestiges of the former Yugoslavia.




Throughout the period of the confederation of Serbia and Montenegro, Serbia used the Serbian dinar, which replaced the Yugoslav dinar. Montenegro used the euro as its currency of choice, without however being a member of the euro zone.
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