Author Topic: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names  (Read 243 times)

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Offline <k>

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Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« on: August 17, 2020, 01:46:35 AM »
Kazakhstan.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2020, 01:47:56 AM »


Kazakhstan has changed the spelling of its name to Qazaqstan.

See: Kazakhstan or Qazaqstan ?.

 
« Last Edit: August 17, 2020, 02:38:48 AM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2020, 01:52:31 AM »


On 19 April 2018, King Mswati III announced that the Kingdom of Swaziland had renamed itself the Kingdom of Eswatini, reflecting the extant Swazi name for the state eSwatini, to mark the 50th anniversary of Swazi independence. The new name, Eswatini, means "land of the Swazis" in the Swazi language and was partially intended to prevent confusion with the similarly named Switzerland.



Our forum member chrisild will be mightily relieved. He regularly confuses Slovenia and Slovakia and has often flown to Amazonia when he meant to visit Macedonia.  :D
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2020, 01:53:56 AM »
Dahomey, 10 000 francs, 1971.

Who remembers Dahomey and knows what it is now called?
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2020, 01:58:00 AM »
5000 CFA francs.

Do you see the name Haute Volta? In English we knew it as the Republic of Upper Volta. What is it called now? Why doesn't it have its own board on the forum?
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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2020, 02:03:49 AM »


The collapse of communism from 1989 into the 1990s caused the creation of some new countries.

In 1993 Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

It was somewhat shocking to see the country divide itself up in a similar way to how Hitler and the Nazis had done it.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2020, 02:10:24 AM »
In 1991 the mighty Soviet Union collapsed, something I had never expected to see in my life time.

The initials CCCP appeared on Soviet coins. It stood for the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics - or USSR in the Latin alphabet.

Initially it collapsed into 15 countries, but then Transnistria seceded from Moldova. In recent years Georgia has lost control of some of its territory, and I do not know what the situation is in parts of Ukraine, for instance Donetsk.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2020, 02:14:27 AM »




From Wikipedia:

Zaire was the name of a sovereign state between 1971 and 1997 in Central Africa that is now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The country was a one-party totalitarian dictatorship, run by Mobutu Sese Seko and his ruling Popular Movement of the Revolution party. Zaire was established following Mobutu's seizure of power in a military coup in 1965.



I liked the name Zaire. It sounded romantic. Now there are too many countries with Congo in their name (well, two), and it's confusing.

See: Zaire, and the many faces of Mobutu.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2020, 02:23:48 AM »




Yugoslavia collapsed in the 1990s. Republics seceded, and terrible wars and atrocities followed.

The cynicism and megalomania of Slobodan Milošević was largely behind this.

The former country now consists of seven countries instead: Slovenia, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Kosovo.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2020, 02:29:23 AM »




The dismantling of the British Empire did not produce as many name changes as one might have expected.

Above you see a coin of Rhodesia, which later became Zimbabwe.



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Offline <k>

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Re: Coins from countries with defunct or amended names
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2020, 02:35:05 AM »




Ceylon became Sri Lanka.



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