How to portray tall thin birds on coins

Started by <k>, August 12, 2020, 08:17:41 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>



Canada, $1, 1967.  Canada goose.  100th anniversary of the Confederation of Canada.


Here a lot of space is left blank on the coin. Most of the design is concentrated in the top half of the coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



New Zealand, $2 coin.  A kotuku, also known as a white heron and a great egret.


Here again, there is a lot of blank space towards the bottom of the coin. The motif takes up some space to make the design look less blank.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Finland, 10 markkaa, 1995. Finland's EU membership.  Swan in flight.


Here the wings extend onto the ring of this bimetallic coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3


This Australian fantasy of 1967 was not an official coin.  See: Australia 1966 Rejected Designs Resurrected as Patterns.




Below you see the design when it was issued as an official Australian silver 20 cents collector coin.

On both designs, the wings take up more space than on the other designs that I have shown.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Bahamas, $2, 1966.  Two flamingos.  Collector coin.


This design avoids the problem of too much blank space by including two birds and also some background scenery.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Russia, 1994, 50 roubles.  Two flamingos.


This design uses a similar approach to the Bahamian design. Maybe the artist had seen that design.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

South Korea, 500 won, 2002.  Crane.

This design of a single bird is successful, because both wings are outstretched and use more space.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In conclusion, we can say that, where designs of tall thin birds are concerned, two birds are better than one, and some background scenery helps to use up blank space.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

The Korean x solution is by far the best imho, as it gives the design depth, but I also like the Australian solution with the denomination utilising the space in the awkward +. Finland had a great solution on a commemorative coin: a whole flock in flight (KM 50). It combined deliciously with the design on the other side. It may not have worked on a smaller coin.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

Most US coins that portray birds portray the bald eagle. Tall, angry looking, and ferocious but not thin. I did find this 2014 America the Beautiful quarter commemorating the Everglades National Park with tall thin birds in the design. The one is a spoonbill, but I'm not sure about the other. Nevertheless, a nice design.

Bruce
Always Faithful

<k>

#10
Apparently the bird on the right is an anhinga.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

brandm24

Quote from: <k> on August 12, 2020, 10:05:45 PM
Apparently the bird on the right is an anhinga.
That's a rather exotic bird that would fit right into the Everglades. An interesting ecosystem to study along with the bayous and swamps of Louisiana.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Figleaf

I did a touristy boat tour in the Everglades long ago. Birds were in trees, not in the water. Makes sense if you know how many always hungry crocodiles are in the water.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

Apparently, the anhinga is a tad more intelligent than the spoonbill, but I notice old spoonie's only "ankle" deep. :)

Bruce
Always Faithful