Author Topic: US Nickels  (Read 850 times)

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Offline gpimper

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #30 on: August 02, 2020, 04:26:02 PM »
Jefferson Nickels...more to them than you might think!  1938 to 1942 were considered "pre-war" Jefferson's.  Designed by Felix Schlag they were copper-nickel mix.  The reverse depicts Thomas Jefferson's plantation with the name MONTICELLO (the name of his plantation).  Here is an OK 1940 Philadelphia.   
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline brandm24

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #31 on: August 02, 2020, 04:41:49 PM »
That could very well be a die defect.  37-D three legged variety was do to a damaged die as was the 36-D 3 1/2 legged variety...guess Denver was having some issues  ;D  Both go for big $ in decent condition.
The 37-D three leg was caused the over-polishing of clashed dies. Instead of changing out the damaged ones a mint employee tried to repair them with an emery stick. Glad he did because he created a very cool error. They definitely had issues at the mint like you say, Greg.

Bruce
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Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #32 on: August 02, 2020, 07:49:33 PM »
It is interesting to me at least is there are 42-D and 42 no mint mark that are pre-war but there is also a
42-P and 42-S that are war coins.

In my opinion the 42-D pre war coin is quite a tough coin to find in MS-65.
The 38-D and S although much fewer in mintage is easier and cheaper to find.

Other than errors the 39-D in MS-65 is the costliest in the set.

Dale

Jefferson Nickels...more to them than you might think!  1938 to 1942 were considered "pre-war" Jefferson's.  Designed by Felix Schlag they were copper-nickel mix.  The reverse depicts Thomas Jefferson's plantation with the name MONTICELLO (the name of his plantation).  Here is an OK 1940 Philadelphia.

Offline gpimper

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #33 on: August 02, 2020, 09:09:12 PM »
Dale, you are correct.  Later 1942 through 1945 Nickels were the same design but were referred to as "wat-time" Nickels.  Major difference was that they were composed of a copper-silver-manganese blend and the P mint mark was introduced.  Here is an example on a 43. 
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #34 on: August 03, 2020, 12:34:34 AM »
An interesting story.

Back in the late 1970's I was a member of a local coin club for a short while and when we met (once a month) there was always a member coin auction.  It was a good source of collector coins and a good place to get rid of our extras. A 1/2 roll of  Uncirculated 1943-P Jefferson Nickels came up for auction and I bid on it.  A lot of us did. I noticed one member was much more aggressive in his bidding and he eventually won the coins at I thought an inflated price. Later I asked him about it and he showed me the 1/2 roll of coins. The entire group was 1943-P 3 over 2. Today you can likely buy ONE for about $700 USD depending on condition. Not a coin I am interested in unless I could find a roll or half roll for cheap :-)

Dale

Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #35 on: August 03, 2020, 12:51:36 AM »
In 1950 the mint at Denver minted 2.62 million coins making the 1950-D the lowest mintage of the series. There were a lot of hype and promotion and there were a LOT of them saved in mint state. So although it is the lowest mintage in MS-65 grade you should be able to find one for $20-30 USD while some of the earlier coins with much higher mintage in MS condition will cost more.

Dale

Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #36 on: August 03, 2020, 12:58:12 AM »
For many years (in modern times say after 1967) the US Mint sets provided ready access to mint state coins for collectors. In 1982 and 1983 there were no mints sets issued although a few souvenir sets were sold at the mint's gifts shops. So the 1982 and 1983 Nickels are the unsung stars of the modern Nickels. The few souvenir sets command a decent premium.

Dale

Offline gpimper

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #37 on: August 03, 2020, 01:51:08 AM »
Dale, that is a beautiful '50!  From 1946 to 2003 the design did not change but they did go back to the copper-nickel...no more silver :-(
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #38 on: August 03, 2020, 02:22:48 AM »
Like I said there were no minst sets in 1982 and 1983 to collect mint state coins from.

There were massive mintages
1982-P, mintage 292,355,000
1982-D, mintage 373,276,544
1982-S, Proof only, mintage 3,857,476
1983-P, mintage 561,615,000
1983-D, mintage 536,726,276
1983-S, Proof only, mintage 3,279,126

Of the non-proof the 83-P cost the most in MS-65. Probably get one for 6-10 USD non graded.
Hard to believe a coin minted in the hundreds of millions cost $ a little less that $10 USD.
Collectors are crazy :-)

This one is not MS-65 but it likely is MS-63.

Dale

Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2020, 02:27:15 AM »
Speaking of coin grading, US coin grading is crazy!

A MS-65 modern US coin compared to a MS-65  US old coin is absolutely not in the same condition.

Dale


Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #40 on: August 03, 2020, 02:31:35 AM »
Thank you very much. When I got it I considered buying it painful :-) Good thing my wife never knew the costs of my purchases, modest though they may seem to many.  I remember in the 70's agonizing over a $3 1913-S Lincoln Cent for several days before I bought it.
Don't have any of those coins now but I did replace it many years later.

Dale


Dale, that is a beautiful '50!  From 1946 to 2003 the design did not change but they did go back to the copper-nickel...no more silver :-(

Offline Prosit

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2020, 02:34:41 AM »
Another note on the 50-D. If you avoid MS-65 you can get a lower MS for maybe $10
and a lot less circulated.  Just my opinion. May have no relation to reality :-)

Dale

Offline gpimper

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #42 on: August 03, 2020, 03:13:38 AM »
Something I'd like to point out about the war-time Nickels...because of the composition of metals they to tend to tarnish more that the copper-nickel types.  Don't hold it against them!   ;) 
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline gpimper

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #43 on: August 03, 2020, 03:33:24 AM »
All right, Dale, we are on :-)  71 Proof!  Philadelphia.  My lighting may have not been the best.
The Chief...aka Greg

Offline gpimper

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Re: US Nickels
« Reply #44 on: August 03, 2020, 03:38:38 AM »
And folks didn't think Nickels were fun  ;D
The Chief...aka Greg