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Canada $1 1935: prototype sketches of Le Voyageur

Started by <k>, May 16, 2020, 05:36:19 PM

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<k>

From Wikipedia:

In 1935, a commemorative silver dollar was struck for King George V's Silver Jubilee. It showed the King on the obverse and, a canoe containing a voyageur, (French-Canadian fur trader) and an Indigenous man, on the reverse. The canoe also contains two bundles of furs—on one, the initials HB, for Hudson's Bay Company may be seen. The reverse was designed by Emanuel Hahn.
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<k>

#1


Hahn's initial sketch of the design known as Le Voyageur.

Image taken from the book "Striking Impressions: The Royal Canadian Mint and Canadian Coinage", by James A Haxby.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


A later sketch of Le Voyageur by Hahn.

Image taken from the book "Striking Impressions: The Royal Canadian Mint and Canadian Coinage", by James A Haxby.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

From Wikipedia:

Beginning in 1936, the silver dollar (in .800 fine silver) was struck more-or-less annually as a regular issue for general circulation, with the same reverse design as in 1935. Although commemorative dollars were struck for circulation for the visit of King George VI in 1939, no regular issue dollars were struck that year, or, as it turned out, until the end of World War II in 1945. Thereafter, Voyageur Dollars were struck each year through 1966, except in years (e.g. 1935, 1939, 1949, 1958, and 1964 ) when a commemorative dollar was struck for circulation.

Beginning in 1968, following the 1967 special Canadian centennial series, which included a new commemorative dollar as well as new commemorative designs for the remaining 5 coins (1, 5, 10, 25, and 50 cents), the Voyageur Dollar series resumed. It now, however, was struck in pure nickel with the diameter reduced from 36 mm to 32 mm, as Canada's coinage was debased from silver to nickel. In 1970, 1971, 1973, and 1974, the series was interrupted for circulating commemorative nickel dollars. Circulating commemorative nickel dollars were struck again in 1982 and 1984, but the Voyageur dollar was also produced. It was last struck for circulation in 1986 and for collectors in 1987.

Neither the silver nor nickel dollars circulated well. However, a need was seen by the mint for a circulating dollar coin. To encourage circulation, the size was reduced, the colour was changed, and the one-dollar note was eliminated from circulation.

Originally, the plans called for the Voyageur design to be continued on the new gold-coloured dollar coin of 1987. However, the set of dies depicting the design was lost in transit. To eliminate the risk of counterfeiting, an alternate design, featuring a loon, was used. This became known as the loonie.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

brandm24

That's a beautiful coin, <k>.

I think I prefer the first design with geese flying over. The final design selected has a cleaner appearance, but the first symbolizes Canada a wee bit more, I think. Still, one of the most appealing large silver coins I've ever seen.

Bruce
Always Faithful

<k>

Quote from: brandm24 on May 16, 2020, 11:45:47 PM
I think I prefer the first design with geese flying over.

Those shapes had not registered with me for some reason. I did not realise that they were meant to be geese. Thank you for pointing this out.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Another interesting aspect is the heraldic lily and the maple leaf tucking in CANADA. The maple leaf is clear. My best guess is that the lily symbolises French-speaking Canadians.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

Quote from: Figleaf on May 17, 2020, 09:54:52 AM
Another interesting aspect is the heraldic lily and the maple leaf tucking in CANADA. The maple leaf is clear. My best guess is that the lily symbolises French-speaking Canadians.

Peter
That was two other features I liked too. Both important symbols of Canada.

Bruce
Always Faithful