Australia: pattern florin of 1910

Started by <k>, March 30, 2020, 04:43:39 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Australia sketches.jpg


In 1909 plans for the first official national Australian coinage were already well advanced.

The Royal Mint (UK), then still based in London, planned the production of the coins for Australia.

In August 1909 a sketch of provisional designs for the sixpence and florin reverses appeared in the Sunday Times newspaper (UK).

They depicted a map of Australia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Australia 1909 pattern.jpg


In 1909 the Royal Mint produced a uniface trial of the map design for the planned florin.

The image below is copyright of The Royal Mint Museum.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


Australia, sixpence, 1910.





Australia, florin, 1910.



Ultimately the map design was not used for either the sixpence or the florin.

A coat of arms was used instead.

See: Predecimal coinage of the Commonwealth of Australia.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

According to Numista.com:

From the trial specimen two electrotypes were made, one for the Royal Australian Mint and one for the New South Wales Museum of Applied Science (now the Powerhouse Museum).

In the 1970s an Australian forger named David Gee stole the electrotype from the New South Wales Museum and used it to make forgeries of the 1909 pattern florin. They are distinguished from the genuine pattern by the fact that Gee also forged an obverse from an Edward VII two pound piece. Replicas of that forgery can be found online.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4


In 1938 a pattern Australian crown was produced, with a design similar to that of the 1909 pattern florin.

My thanks to Australian numismatic researcher and writer T. Vincent Verheyen for providing this image.

He found a photo of it at the Victorian public records office in Melbourne, file VPRS 10219/P00001/3.

Unfortunately, there was no documentation with it.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.


malj1

Quote from: <k> on March 30, 2020, 04:56:50 PM
In the 1970s an Australian forger named David Gee stole the electrotype from the New South Wales Museum and used it to make forgeries of the 1909 pattern florin.

Here is the book written about the theft:
THE TRUE STORY OF DAVID GEE AUSTRALIA'S MOST AUDACIOUS COIN .FORGER  HEADS I WIN by ©  Jeffrey Watson, Don Thomas end Jack Bennett Publ. 1986 ISBN 0 207 15246 2.

I also have the newspaper cutting from the time.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.