Author Topic: Comments on 'Luxembourg's coinage after World War 2 but before the euro'  (Read 609 times)

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Offline <k>

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Parent topic: Luxembourg's coinage after World War 2 but before the euro.



The parent topic (above) gives an overview of Luxembourg's pre-euro coinage after World War 2. Please post any comments, questions or corrections here.
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Offline <k>

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Was the 5 francs coin of 1949 a commemorative?

Interesting that 'franc' is spelled 'frang'. It suggests an 'ng' sound is used instead of the usual nasal vowel. I heard a similar pronunciation in the south of France when I visited in 1979.
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Offline <k>

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This silver 250 francs coin was issued in 1963 to commemorate the Millennium of Luxembourg City.

It shows an attractive aerial view of part of the city - instantly recognisable to anybody who has visited.

It was a collector coin only, so I post it here and not in the main topic.
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Offline chrisild

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Was the 5 francs coin of 1949 a commemorative?
No, I don't think so. Was simply a one-year issue ...

Quote
Interesting that 'franc' is spelled 'frang'.
Frang is the Luxembourgish word for franc. See here for example:
LOD - Lëtzebuerger Online Dictionnaire
Quite a few coins from LU mix languages this way. :)

Christian

Offline <k>

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I see. Thank you for that.
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Offline <k>

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I find the number of different crowns portrayed quite interesting.

How many are there? Or are they just shown from different angles?















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Offline Figleaf

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It is important to note that the technical specifications of the Luxembourg coins were normally the same as those of the same denomination Belgian coins. The reason for a change of type was usually following a change in Belgian circulating coins. In practice, most coins in circulation in Luxembourg were Belgian. This also explains the gap in mintage as it became clear that the Luxembourg franc would be succeeded by the euro. Mintage could simply be stopped as a cost-saving measure. Belgian coins filled the gap.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Look at the fonts used for the year on these coins, which are part of the same series. Why are they so different? Admittedly they are not as bad as on the pre-euro Austrian coins.

A little more uniformity would have been nice. Is it too late to ask for a refund?  >:(
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Offline <k>

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And look at the NJL and N . J . L . on these coins of the same series. This was not planned properly.
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Offline <k>

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Look at the differences in the treatment of the legend on the obverse of these coins.

Admittedly they are all from different series.
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Offline <k>

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Amongst all the wreaths and the heraldry, this lone design of a puddler stood out.

I suppose the pre-euro German coinage was similar, with its lone human (a peasant woman) on the 50 pfennig coin.

The Belgian pre-euro coinage had the head of a miner but also the head of Mercury. Nothing else matched with those designs.

So there was no great logic behind these design series.
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Offline chrisild

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Amongst all the wreaths and the heraldry, this lone design of a puddler stood out.

The design was used for various coins and patterns of different denominations though. Today that puddler may appear a little odd, but between the late 19c and the mid 20c Luxembourg, the steel industry played a very important rule in the country.

Don't know about the different crown styles, but another thing is interesting: Luxembourgish did not become an official language until the mid-1980s. At that time, the spelling of the country name in Luxembourgish changed from „Letzeburg“ to „Lëtzebuerg“ (with the trema and the ue). When Grand Duke Jean used the country name as part of his title, however, it was always in French anyway: Grand-Duc de Luxembourg.

Side note: In Luxembourg, just as in some other European monarchies, it is common that the head of state resigns at some point. So in 2000, Jean resigned, and Hereditary Grand Duke Henri became Grand Duke. Now this happened in the transition phase between the launch of the euro (Jan-1999) and the euro cash becoming legal tender (Jan-2002), so the country simply avoided issuing any coins in that three year phase. All franc coins are dated 1998 and earlier; all euro coins are dated 2002 and later. The only exception is a 500F commem issued in 2000 when Henri became head of state.

Christian