Author Topic: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro  (Read 4186 times)

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Offline <k>

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Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« on: April 08, 2019, 08:56:35 PM »


Belgium: Flanders, Wallonia, and Brussels.





Belgium and its neighbours.



From Wikipedia:

The Kingdom of Belgium covers an area of 30,688 square kilometres (11,849 sq mi) and has a population of more than 11.4 million. The capital and largest city is Brussels. Belgium's institutional organisation is structured on both regional and linguistic grounds. It is divided into three highly autonomous regions: Flanders in the north, Wallonia in the south, and the Brussels-Capital Region. Brussels is the smallest and most densely populated region, as well as the richest region in terms of GDP per capita.

Belgium is home to two main linguistic groups or Communities: the Dutch-speaking, mostly Flemish Community, which constitutes about 59 percent of the population, and the French-speaking Community, which comprises about 40 percent of all Belgians. A small German-speaking Community, numbering around one percent, exists in the East Cantons. The Brussels-Capital Region is officially bilingual (French and Dutch), although French is the dominant language. Belgium's linguistic diversity and related political conflicts are reflected in its political history and complex system of governance, made up of six different governments.

The second half of the 20th century was marked by rising tensions between the Dutch-speaking and the French-speaking citizens, fueled by differences in language and culture and the unequal economic development of Flanders and Wallonia. This continuing antagonism has led to several far-reaching reforms, resulting in a transition from a unitary to a federal arrangement during the period from 1970 to 1993. Despite the reforms, tensions between the groups have remained, if not increased; there is significant separatism particularly among the Flemish; controversial language laws exist, such as the municipalities with language facilities; and the formation of a coalition government took 18 months following the June 2010 federal election, a world record. Unemployment in Wallonia is more than double that of Flanders, which boomed after the war.

Belgium is one of the six founding countries of the European Union and hosts the official seats of the European Commission, the Council of the European Union, and the European Council, as well as a seat of the European Parliament in the country's capital, Brussels. Belgium is also a founding member of the Eurozone, NATO, OECD, and WTO, and a part of the trilateral Benelux Union and the Schengen Area. Brussels hosts several of the EU's official seats as well as the headquarters of many major international organizations such as NATO.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2019, 08:59:28 PM »




The greater version of the Belgian coat of arms.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2019, 09:01:08 PM »



The national flag of the kingdom of Belgium is a tricolour of three bands of black, yellow, and red. The colours were taken from the coat of arms of the Duchy of Brabant, and the vertical design may be based on the flag of France.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2019, 09:03:21 PM »



The flag of Flanders, called the Vlaamse Leeuw ("Flemish Lion") or leeuwenvlag ("Lion flag"), is the flag of the Flemish Community and Flemish Region in Belgium. The flag was officially adopted by the Cultural Council for the Dutch Cultural Community in 1973, and later, in 1985, by its successor, the Flemish Parliament. In 1990, also the coat of arms was adopted as an official symbol.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2019, 09:05:44 PM »



The flag of Wallonia represents the Walloon Region and French Community. Designed in 1913, the flag depicts a red rooster on a yellow field. The red and yellow colouring is historically associated with the city of Li├Ęge. The flag's association with Wallonia also mean that it is commonly used by the Walloon Movement.

On 3 July 1991, the French Community adopted by decree the Walloon Flag as its symbol, confirming an older decree from the former French Cultural Community of Belgium on 20 July 1975. On 15 July 1998, the Walloon Flag was officially recognised as the Flag of Wallonia by the Walloon Region.

 
« Last Edit: February 03, 2020, 11:55:10 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2019, 09:21:33 PM »
During World War 2, Belgium was occupied by the Nazis. As a war-time measure, the regular coinage was replaced by a zinc coinage.

See: Belgium under Nazi Occupation.

After the war, a new coin series, with new designs, was issued in stages, from 1948 to 1954.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2019, 09:26:00 PM »



I shall post the coins in order of denomination, not date.

In 1953 the first new 20 centimes was issued, with a French legend on the obverse. The coin was made of bronze and was 17 mm in diameter.

However, both French and Flemish-legend coins had a common reverse, showing a miner with a lantern.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2019, 09:27:52 PM »




The reverse of the 20 centimes coin with French legend.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2019, 09:28:34 PM »




The version with Flemish legend was issued in 1954.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2019, 09:36:41 PM »



The first new 50 centimes coins - both language version - were issued in 1952. They were made of bronze and were 19 mm in diameter. They had the same reverse design as the 20 centimes coins.

See: The last half-franc coin - Museum of the National Bank of Belgium
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2019, 09:37:56 PM »




The obverse of the Flemish version of the 50 centimes.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2019, 09:38:43 PM »




The obverse of the French version of the 50 centimes.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2019, 10:12:10 PM »



In 1950 the Flemish and French legend versions of the 1 franc coin were issued. They were made of copper-nickel. The reverse design featured the head of the goddess Ceres, alongside a cornucopia.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2019, 10:13:50 PM »




The common obverse design featured a crowned oak branch. Here you see the Flemish legend version.
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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2019, 10:14:44 PM »




Here you see the French legend version.
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