Author Topic: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone  (Read 2084 times)

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Offline <k>

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The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« on: April 28, 2018, 06:01:06 PM »
Sierra Leone, officially the Republic of Sierra Leone, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Guinea to the northeast, Liberia to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest. Sierra Leone has a tropical climate, with a diverse environment ranging from savanna to rainforests. The country has a total area of 71,740 km2 (27,699 sq mi) and a population of around 7 million. It is a constitutional republic with a directly elected president and unicameral legislature known as Parliament.

Sierra Leone became independent from the United Kingdom on 27 April 1961, led by Sir Milton Margai, who became the country's first Prime Minister. From 1991 to 2002, the Sierra Leone Civil War was fought and devastated the country. The proxy war left more than 50,000 people dead, much of the country's infrastructure destroyed and over two million Sierra Leoneans displaced as refugees in neighbouring countries. In January 2002, President Ahmad Tejan Kabbah fulfilled his campaign promise by ending the civil war, with the help of the British government, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the United Nations. Kabbah won reelection in the 2002 general election for his final term as president, with 70% of the vote.

More recently, the 2014 Ebola outbreak overburdened the weak healthcare infrastructure, leading to more deaths from medical neglect than Ebola itself. It created a humanitarian crisis situation and heavily impacted economic growth. The country has an extremely low life expectancy relative to other countries, at 57.8 years.

About sixteen ethnic groups inhabit Sierra Leone, each with its own language and customs. The two largest and most influential are the Temne and the Mende people. The Temne are predominantly found in the north of the country, while the Mende are predominant in the southeast. Comprising a small minority are the Krio people, who are descendants of freed African American and West Indian slaves.

Although the English language is the official language spoken at schools and government administration, the Krio language, an English-based creole, is the most widely spoken language across Sierra Leone and is spoken by 97% of the country's population. Sierra Leone is a Muslim majority country, with the overall Muslim population at 78% of the population, though there is an influential Christian minority of various denominations at about 21% of the population. Almost all of Sierra Leone's Heads of State have been Christians.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2018, 06:02:21 PM »
The colours of the flag carry cultural, political, and regional meanings. The green alludes to the country's natural resources – specifically agriculture and its mountains – while the white epitomizes "unity and justice". The blue evokes the "natural harbour" of Freetown, the capital city of Sierra Leone, as well as the hope of "contributing to world peace" through its usage
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Offline <k>

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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2018, 06:03:17 PM »
The shield on the arms depicts a lion beneath a zigzag border, representing the Lion Mountains, after which the country was named. It also shows three torches which are meant to symbolize peace and dignity. At the base are wavy bars depicting the sea.

The supporters of the shield are lions, similar to those on the colonial badge. The three main colours from the shield – green, white and blue – were used to form the flag.

The green represents agricultural and natural resources, the blue represents the Harbour of Freetown and the white represents unity and justice. At the bottom of the shield, the national motto can be seen.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2018, 06:04:05 PM »
Sierra Leone's location in Africa.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2018, 06:07:28 PM »

Sir Milton Margai.



Sir Milton Augustus Strieby Margai (December 7, 1895 - April 28, 1964) was a Sierra Leonean politician and the first prime minister of Sierra Leone. He was the main architect of the post-colonial constitution of Sierra Leone and guided his nation to independence, which was achieved on 27 April 1961 in 1961. Margai died in office in Freetown in 1964 and was succeeded as prime minister by his brother Albert Margai.

 
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 06:40:21 AM by <k> »
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2018, 06:18:50 PM »

The common obverse of the first coins featured Sir Milton Margai.



The leone was introduced on 4 August 1964. It replaced the British West African pound at a rate of 1 pound = 2 leones (i.e., 1 leone = 10 shillings). Decimal coins were introduced in denominations of ½, 1, 5, 10 and 20 cents. The coins size and compositions were based in part on those of the former colonial state British West Africa. All bore the portrait of the first president of Sierra Leone, Sir Milton Margai.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2018, 06:22:32 PM »

Half cent.



The reverse of the half cent coin featured two bonga fish (Ethmalosa fimbriata). All the reverse designs of the coins, as well as the portrait of Sir Milton Margai, were the work of Michael Rizzello, an artist and sculptor who designed many coins for the Royal Mint (UK).
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2018, 06:25:14 PM »

1 cent coin.



The reverse of the 1 cent coin featured two oil palm branches.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2018, 06:27:49 PM »

5 cents coin.



The reverse of the 5 cents coin featured the Kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra).
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2018, 06:30:22 PM »

10 cents coin.



The reverse of the 10 cents coin a ring of Oryza sativa grains, commonly known as Asian rice.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2018, 06:39:49 PM »

20 cents coin.



The reverse of the 20 cents coin featured a rampant heraldic lion in front of two oil palms.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2018, 06:48:55 PM »

1 leone.



The 1 leone coin, the highest denomination, featured the coat of arms on the reverse.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2018, 07:02:09 PM »

Siaka Stevens, obverse portrait.



From 1972, beginning with the 50 cents coin, a new design series was gradually issued. The common obverse featured a portrait of Siaka Probyn Stevens (1905 – 1988), who was Prime Minister from 1967 to 1971 and President from 1971 to 1985. This portrait was also the work of Michael Rizzello.
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2018, 07:17:56 PM »

1 cent coin.



The new design series now featured the coat of arms on the reverse of every coin. Instead of Sierra Leone, the legend included the title "Republic of Sierra Leone".
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Re: The coinage of modern Sierra Leone
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2018, 07:19:35 PM »

50 cents coin.



A half cent coin was issued as before, but as before there was no standard circulating 1 leone coin.

The 1 leone coin was issued in proof sets only.

 

 
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 11:31:14 PM by <k> »
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