Author Topic: France, token  (Read 3002 times)

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Offline JeanPar

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France, token
« on: July 02, 2007, 03:00:26 PM »
Can some one tell me where I can find this coin -?- in Krause Mishler? Thank you in advance.



Rgds., Jean Par :)
« Last Edit: March 10, 2012, 10:22:52 PM by coffeetime »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin or token ?
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2007, 05:33:15 PM »
This is one of a long series of tokens issued in France in the period 1916-1922. Châtellerault is a town in the departement of Vienne of military importance as the production centre of the "Lebel" rifle, the standard for Fench troops in the first world war. Your piece is the 10 centimes from a series that also contains a 5 and a 25 centimes. All are dated 1922. The tokens are signed Thévenon, a noted sculptor and designer of many other French trade tokens.

In 1916, the supply of coins started to stagnate and tokens first came about. At the end of the first world war, the official French dogma was "les boches payeront", the Germans will pay everything. This also meant that the old silver coins of the Semeuse type would come back. Until such time, the government refused to issue coins in base metal and locally issued tokens filled the gap.

It was of course quite beyond the capacity of the German economy to come up with the amounts demanded. To their credit, the US and UK accepted this and wanted to get the German economy running again. However, France and Belgium were not in the mood for concessions to Germany. In 1923, France occupied the Ruhr area in order to enforce further payments, which led to bloody encounters between striking German workers and the French army. This ignoble phase was followed by a period of hyperinflation that destroyed the remainder of the German economy and finally made the Franco-Belgian coalition see the light.

At home, France finally allowed new coins to be issued, not by the central government, but by the national chamber of cmmerce and industry. The Franco-Belgan policy was doomed, as its demands were impossible, but by not fighting inflation at home, squeezing the German economy dry and humiliating the German nation beyond repair, it set the stage for another world war.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 23, 2017, 06:07:18 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline JeanPar

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Re: Coin or token ?
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2007, 12:53:10 AM »
Thanks for the information, Peter! :) This way one learns each day something 8)


translateltd

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Re: Coin or token ?
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2007, 09:39:08 PM »
This is one of a long series of tokens issued in France in the period 1916-1922. At home, France finally allowed new coins to be issued, not by the central government, but by the national chamber of cmmerce and industry.

Peter

Was this also the reason behind the Belgian coins of 1922 or thereabouts with BON POUR / GOED VOOR preceding the denomination?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coin or token ?
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2007, 10:19:06 PM »
Quite right, Martin. Some concept, but their "bon pour" coins were issued by the government.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

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Coin or token ?
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2007, 11:57:28 PM »
Quite right, Martin. Some concept, but their "bon pour" coins were issued by the government.

Peter

Peter,the 1924 1 Leu & 2 Lei from Romania are also a government-issued token coinage,as they are inscribed 'BUN PENTRU' (Good For).

Hundreds of towns in France & Germany issued these emergency tokens,as there was a severe shortage of small change during World War I & for a few years after that.

Aidan.