Author Topic: Shah Jahan: Rupee, Akbarabad, AH 1038 RY2, KM 224.4......Spl 'changeover' coin !  (Read 273 times)

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Offline mitresh

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Shah Jahan, Silver Rupee, Dar-ul-khilafat Akbarabad, 11.50g, 22mm, AH 1038 RY 2, Farwardin, KM 224.4

While the coin looks 'normal' silver rupee, it is indeed a special 'changeover' coin as it signifies the change in the name of the city from Agra to Dar-ul-Khilafat Akbarabad.


Note by Shailen Bhandare

This is the earliest silver issue with mint-name 'Akbarabad'. We see from coins that the change of Agra to Akbarabad took place in AH1038, just prior to the commencement of the month Farwardin (the month on this coin) which covers the period 10 March to 10 April 1629. Quite likely, the name was changed during the celebration of Shahjahan’s first anniversary on 16 January 1629. But there might be a few other celebrations when the name could have been changed - Shahjahan's weighing (3 Jamada II, 1038 = 18 January 1629) which took place at Gwalior or the Nowrooz festival celebrated on 24 Rajab 1038 = 09 March 1629.

For details, see Alan deShazo's article in ONS, or the summary provided by Jan Lingen on Zeno #122732.

Note on Zeno #122732 by Jan Lingen

The coins of Shah Jahan struck at Agra commenced with the date AH1037/Ry Ahd and may have been struck from the 8th of Jumada II (=25 Bahman (11) = 04 February 1628). All coins of AH1037/Ry Ahd bear the mint name Dar al-Khalifat Agra.

The initial issue has the Ry Ahd on top (ZENO#26348), followed by the shift of the Ry to the 2nd line and ‘badshah ghazi’ on top
AH1038/Ry Ahd commenced on 21 August 1628 (01 Muharram =10 Shahrewar (06), AH1038)

2nd regnal year commenced on 16 January 1629 (01 Jumada II = 7 Bahman (11), AH1038)

The first coin to be struck in AH1038, has still the mint-name Dar al-Khalifat Agra and Ry Ahd (ANS 1972.284.39).

After this issue the Ilahi months were introduced on the coinage, but also the name of Agra was changed into Akbarabad. The earliest issue of this type is AH1038/Ry 2, Ilahi month Farwardin (01) (ZENO#27523 & 27524). This covers the period 10 March to 10 April 1629.

The above coin of AH1038/Ry 2 (period 16 January to 10 March 1629) without Ilahi month is observed now for the first time. (Mitresh Note: the coin talked about is a gold Mohur with date AH 1038 RY2 but no Ilahi month).

Other coins for AH1038/Ry 2 are known of the months Ardibihisht (02) square , Tir (04) round (PMC 1238), Amardad (05) square.
Till recently no coins for AH1038/Ry 2 with the Ilahi month Khurdad (03) had been observed, but ZENO#139713 proves that this date exists too.

AH 1039 commenced on the 30 Amardad (05), so for AH1038 no later Ilahi months will be observed. The first issue for AH1039/Ry 2 is with the Ilahi month Shahrewar (06) (PMC.1239), but then changed to the non-Ilahi type ZENO#26347, by now also the mint-epithet ‘Dar al-Khalifat’ was skipped on the rupees and mohurs. It continued to be used on the 'Nisar'-coinage.

On account of the coins, the change of Agra into Akbarabad took place in AH1038, prior to the commencement of the month Farwardin (10 March 1629) and possibly during the celebration of Shah Jahan’s first anniversary on 16 January 1629.

But there a few other celebration as well, viz.: His Majesty’s Solar weighing (3 Jamada II, 1038 = 18 January 1629) which took place in Gwalior or the Nauroz festival celebrated on 24 Rajab 1038 = 09 March 1629.

The ‘Shah Jahan Nama’ of ‘Inayat Khan, however, is silent about it. Throughout the book Akbarabad is used as the name for Imperial capital.




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Offline Figleaf

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If you realise the historic interest of the coin, it becomes even better. Thanks for pulling the documentation together, Mitresh. Numismatics may only be a branch of the science of history, it can provide some really interesting information.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.