Author Topic: The decimal coinage of Australia  (Read 2235 times)

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Offline <k>

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The decimal coinage of Australia
« on: October 16, 2017, 12:53:54 AM »
In 1963 the Australian government took the decision to prepare for decimalisation. The government decided that the new coinage should portray Australian wildlife. A design competition was held, and here you can see some of the designs that were considered: Unsuccessful Australian Decimal Designs.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2017, 12:58:02 AM »

Stuart Devlin.



The design competition was won by Stuart Devlin. He thought that most traditional coin designs did not take sufficient account of the circular shape of the flan on which they were placed. Additionally, he felt that a design should occupy more of the surface of the flan than was usually the case.

 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2018, 12:05:30 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2017, 01:00:33 AM »




The first decimal coins used the new effigy of the Queen, created by Arnold Machin.

The 1 cent coin depicted a feathertail glider (Acrobates pygmaeus),  the world's smallest gliding possum.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2017, 01:01:33 AM »

A larger image of the reverse design.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2017, 01:02:53 AM »

The feather-tailed glider.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2017, 01:05:10 AM »

The 2 cent coin depicted a frilled necked lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii).

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2017, 01:07:13 AM »

The frill-necked lizard.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2017, 01:12:35 AM »

The echidna, or spiny anteater, appeared on the 5 cents coin.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2017, 01:15:16 AM »

The echidna.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2017, 01:16:58 AM »

The 10 cents coin featured a male lyrebird.

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2017, 01:20:43 AM »

The male lyrebird, fanning its tail out in a courtship display.

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2017, 09:27:06 AM »

The 20 cents coin depicted a platypus.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2017, 09:33:06 AM »

A platypus underwater.

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2017, 09:39:19 AM »

The 50 cents showed a new version of the coat of arms.

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2017, 09:45:26 AM »
Unlike the 5, 10 and 20 cents coins, the 50 cents was not copper-nickel but silver. However, it was discovered that the Australians often mistook the 50 cents for a 20 cents coin, which was 3 mm narrower in diameter. As a result, trials were performed to find a more satisfactory coin.

As you can see here, the Royal Australian Mint considered 7-sided, 12-sided and 16-sided versions of the coin.