Author Topic: Khwarezm shah Ala ud-Din Muhammad (1200-1220), Trio in copper and silver.  (Read 465 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline THCoins

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5 516
In the index on WoC already there is quite a selection of Jitals issued under the rule of Ala-ud-din Muhammad Khwarezmshah. His big coppers are a bit under represented, so i'd like to present some.

The coins shown are generally known as "Broad Dirhams". In contrast to other dirhams, these were not made of solid silver, but of copper with a thin silver layer which has commonly disappeared on many collector specimen. The "broad"is meant literally, all the specimen shown here have a diameter around 32 mm.

In style this is typical city coinage, with also similarities to types issued under Mongol and Qarakhanid rule.
To distinguish the different types these are usually named after the city of issue, but they are also known by the words which are placed at the top of the obverse text.

Coin 1 - Balkh, "Qadiri-Dirham", 4.49 gr, Album-1723.
Coin 2 - Tirmidh (Termez), "Fathi-Dirham", 4.1 gr, Album-1724.
Coin 3 - Tirmidh, "Sultani-Dirham", 5.16 gr, Album-1724.

All these have some of their original silvering left, which makes them better readable than most.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 06:35:23 PM by THCoins »

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 494
Great trio, TH. I am fortunate to have a billon jital of Ala ud-Din Muhammad as well as some broad dirhams of previous and later rulers. I am frustrated by not understanding the economics of them.

The jitals look coppery and are listed as low grade silver. They look a bit lumpy. Mine weighs 3 grams. The broad dirham, as you note, were silvered. They look fragile and the earlier ones are also about 3 grams. Those are completely different approaches for basically the same coin. I am wondering if there were mints that struck both coins. Or did some mints produce the one and other mints the other?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline capnbirdseye

  • Vic
  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6 310
Superb coins, I don't have a single example of these copper based broad Dirhams but will see what I can find as I would like at least one example
Vic

Offline toofast

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 99
    • Numismatics of Iran and Turkestan
These coins were published by Elena A. Davidovich (1997) in "The Coins of Muhammad b. Takish (1200-1220) from a Hoard Found on the Site of Stary Termez".
Here is the summary of it.
Quote
A description of 25 coins from  a large hoard disclosed in Stary Termez (South Uzbekistan). The coins (now in a private collection) belong to silvered copper dirhams of Muhammad b. Takish struck at Balkh, Termez, Chaghaniyan and Samarqand between 613/1216-17 (earliest date) and 616/1219-20 (latest date). The 613  and 615 AH dirhams of Samarqand have been known since long ago and published many times. The rest one are either rare or unknown at all. For instance, the 615/1218-19 Termez coins of three types and the coin dated 616/1219-20 are met with for the first time. The 616/1219-20 dirham of Termez is scarce, while only one sample piece has been published before. The dirhams of Balkh and Chaghaniyan can also be considered scarce to rare.

--Dmitry

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 494
Very interesting, Dmitry. Can you read the date on the three coins above?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline toofast

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 99
    • Numismatics of Iran and Turkestan
The first coin is dirham of Balkh, [61]6 AH.
Obverse center:
قادرى
السلطن الا
عظم علا الد
نيا و الدين ابو الفتح
    Reverse center:
بلخ
محمد بن السلطن
برهان امير
المومنين
Obverse margin:
ضرب هذالدرهم ببلخ فى شهور سنه سث
Reverse margin:
Quran IX 33


Offline toofast

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 99
    • Numismatics of Iran and Turkestan
The second coin is dirham of Termez, 615 AH.
Obverse center:
فتحى
السلطان الا
عظم علا الد
نيا و الدين انو
الفتخ
  Reverse center:

محمد بن
السلطن
تكش
Obverse margin:
ضرب هذ االدرهم بترمذ سنه خمس عشر ستمائة
  Reverse margin:
Same as on the obverse

« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 01:05:11 PM by toofast »

Offline THCoins

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5 516
Thanks for the background information and additions Dmitry ! I had not gotten around to studying these in detail yet and see that i already made some errors in my transcriptions.
I got these in a large lot. I have a second example of both the Tirmidh pieces. There were also some medium size falus which i will show on another occasion.

Peter, i think these large fiduciary Dirhams are mostly linked to the cities in the North-West of the Khwarezmian empire.
The Jitals were more used for local trade in the Eastern regions. There are a few cities where both types were minted.