Author Topic: Japan, 10 yen 1979  (Read 2271 times)

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Offline ghipszky

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Japan, 10 yen 1979
« on: August 02, 2009, 02:17:22 AM »
Here is another coin I need help with.
Ginger
« Last Edit: August 02, 2009, 01:04:23 PM by Figleaf »

Offline Prosit

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Re: Chinese coin, I think
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2009, 02:23:34 AM »
I had one of those!  Never was sure where it was from.  Good looking coin tho.
Dale
 

Offline ghipszky

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Re: Chinese coin, I think
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2009, 02:48:16 AM »
My first thought was China, but I am not totally sure. Any one out there who could help, then both Dale and I will know what type of coin it is.
Ginger

Offline Overlord

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Re: Chinese coin, I think
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2009, 04:18:21 AM »
Japan, 10 Yen
Reeded edge: Y#73
Plain edge: Y#73a
« Last Edit: August 02, 2009, 04:21:16 AM by Overlord »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Chinese coin, I think
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2009, 01:00:55 PM »
Look at the row of characters just below the 10. The fourth character from the left looks like a cross, which means 10. The character to its left is 5 and the one to the right, looking like a window with curtains is 4. Together, they read 54. Add the accession date of emperor Hirohito (1926) and deduct 1 and you get 1979, the date of the coin. In front of the date is the name of the era: Showa. This tells you that the coin was struck during the reign of emperor Hirohito.

The same cross is at left, below the temple. The other character means yen. The three characters above the temple mean "Nippon koku", the official name of Japan. These coins are easier to read than those of Harar ::)

As for the temple, have a look here.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 02, 2009, 01:03:08 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: Japan, 10 yen 1979
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2009, 01:26:03 PM »
Thanks a ton for breaking it down, Peter. Do you know any good references (online or offline) for reading Japanese coins?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Japan, 10 yen 1979
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2009, 01:40:47 PM »
I used the table with all the funny numbers in KM for the funny numbers. Just like Arabic numbers, Japanese/Chinese numbers are easy to remember with a bit of practice. The date conversion method is in the introduction of KM, but it works just like any ole regnal year anywhere in Asia. Since the dates of the eras are in the header of the Japan chapter, that's a short cut. The eras are specified in the header of the Japan chapter in KM. The country name is in Wikipedia, in the Japan lemma. I am now waiting with trepidation for Martin's comment, because he's a pro when it comes to Japanese. He doesn't call himself translateltd for nothing.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Japan, 10 yen 1979
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2009, 03:03:53 PM »
The South Korean and Japanese coins look very similar.I was also confused when I got my first coin from S.Korea.
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translateltd

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Re: Japan, 10 yen 1979
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2009, 10:05:10 PM »
I am now waiting with trepidation for Martin's comment, because he's a pro when it comes to Japanese. He doesn't call himself translateltd for nothing.


I got to be "translateltd" from the many hours that I spent deciphering just such squiggles and "windows with curtains" as a kid, using the various tables to be found in coin books at the time, and when they ran out, the sets of encyclopaedias at the local library.  Maybe I should have posted this under "What kind of coin collector are you?"  I'm the kind that got an education and a completely non-numismatic career out of my hobby :-)