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Tuvalu: unadopted designs

Started by <k>, December 25, 2016, 05:30:47 PM

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<k>

The Gilbert and Ellice Islands were a British protectorate from 1892 and a colony from 1916. A referendum was held in December 1974 to determine whether the Gilbert Islands and Ellice Islands should each have their own administration. As a consequence of the referendum, the Gilbert and Ellice Islands colony ceased to exist on 1 January 1976 and the separate countries of Kiribati and Tuvalu came into existence.

The Ellice Islands were renamed as Tuvalu, which became independent from Britain on 1 October 1978. The Gilbert Islands were renamed as Kiribati, which is apparently the local way of saying "Gilbert". Kiribati became independent on 12 July 1979.

Tuvalu previously used the Australian dollar but issued its first coinage in 1976. The Tuvaluan dollar was kept at par with the Australian dollar. The reverse designs of the coins were created by London goldsmith John Donald. They were modelled by English artist, sculptor and coin designer, Avril Vaughan.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Tuvalu 2c.jpg

2 cents.  Butterfly fish. Not adopted.


The legend "Tuvalu Islands" was incorrect but was later changed.

There is much to learn when a new nation is born.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Tuvalu 5c.jpg

An early 5 cents design showing an octopus.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
Tuvalu 10c.jpg

A shark on the 10 cents.

This was later moved to the 5 cents.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4
Tuvalu 20c.jpg

The crab was later moved to the 10 cents.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
Tuvalu 50c.jpg

The flying fish was later moved to the 20 cents.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
Tuvalu 1c.jpg

The stingray later moved to the 2 cents coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#7
Tuvalu dollar.jpg


The dollar was originally going to have a hole.

The original design featured a variety of sea shells.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8
Tuvalu dollar-.jpg


This design shows a palm tree.

It is not successful because of the hole.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
Tuvalu $1.jpg

Eventually it was decided to feature a turtle on the dollar.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
Tuvalu $5 commem.jpg

The commemorative 5 dollars shows an outrigger.
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<k>

#11
Tuvalu $50 gold.jpg


A design of a traditional meeting hut, with an open entrance.

It was meant for the commemorative gold 50 dollars.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The Royal Mint contacted the experts at the Natural History Museum, London, for their thoughts. They had several criticisms, concerning the appearance (one or two creatures looked too "Disney-like"), anatomy and postures of the animals - too many to list.

The Royal Mint also contacted the Tuvaluans regarding the correctness of the outrigger designs. Their experts replied that they looked too much like the Kiribatese vessels, which were rather different. And they added other technical details - again, too many to list.

Meanwhile, the Royal Mint Advisory Committee liked the designs but thought they should show more background detail. Later they thought that Mr Donald had added maybe too much detail so asked him to remove some.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#13
Tuvalu-1c.jpg


1 cent. The shell of a Lambis millipeda: a millipede spider conch.

This is a species of sea snail.

The RMAC thought it too detailed.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14
Tuvalu-1c-.jpg

The 1 cent design with less detail.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.