Papua New Guinea: 1975 coinage - adopted and unadopted designs

Started by <k>, December 24, 2016, 03:15:27 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Papua New Guinea issued its first coinage as an independent state in 1975. 

The designs were produced by David J Thomas for the Royal Mint.

They were later modified by artists and engravers at the Franklin Mint.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG Flying fox-1.jpg


A flying fox hangs upside down on this unadopted design for the 1 toea coin.

The issued coin features a butterfly.

In recent years Fiji adopted a similar design for its 10 cents coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG anat-correct-2.jpg


PNG-2-.jpg

An unadopted design of a butterfly cod.

The same species appears on the issued coin but looks rather different.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG-5.jpg

A pitted shell turtle.  The issued design was quite similar.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG-10.jpg



PNG anat-correct-10.jpg

A pig. A spotted cuscus appeared on the issued 10 toea coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG-20.jpg



PNG anat-correct9.jpg


A spotted cuscus - a type of marsupial. 

A dwarf cassowary appears on the issued 20 toea coin.

A different design of the cuscus appears on the issued 10 toea coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG 1 kina sketch.jpg

A single crocodile for the 1 kina coin.  Not adopted.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG 1K-rev.jpg

Two crocodiles for the 1 kina coin. 

A rather different version was adopted for the issued coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG 1K-obv sketch.jpg


A design intended for the obverse of the kina coin.

It features a stylised bird of paradise.

The issued design is similar but different in certain respects.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

PNG 1K-obv.jpg


This is somewhat closer to the issued design.

The date is in the same position.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Here you see the issued coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Obverse of the 1 kina coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

I wonder why they felt such a great need for a hole on the kina...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

Here is the paragraph from From Cowrie to Kina giving the official decision to have a hole:

On 10 April 1974 the decision to have a hole in the 1 Kina coin was announced; the reasons given being that it was a link with traditional currencies, most of which had natural or man made holes, also that "in the Papua New Guinea situation, this feature can be very useful in facilitating the storage and carrying of money". One will recall also that the first circulating coinage to bear the legend "New Guinea", struck between 1935 and 1945 during the Australian Mandate, was also holed. A holed coin would also be lighter in weight and the lower metal content would reduce costs. The date for introducing the new currency — K Day — was proposed for late April 1975.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.