Author Topic: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago  (Read 2699 times)

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BC Numismatics

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Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« on: July 13, 2009, 07:28:10 AM »
You will all be very pleased to know that I finally got in a 50c. coin of the Republic of Trinidad & Tobago that actually circulated as currency - the 1977 50c. coin,which has the steel drums on the reverse.

They came in an old coin album that I had to strip at work yesterday afternoon.In the same album,there were also 4 examples of the Trinidad & Tobago 1969 F.A.O. commemorative $1 coin.I also picked up 2 of them,as one of them is an error struck slightly off-centre.

Aidan.

Galapagos

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2009, 10:28:30 PM »
The ones I can't find are the 1983 and 1984 five cents designs showing a butterfly.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2009, 05:03:16 AM »
In the fictional book Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, the island that Crusoe was stranded on (Sept 30, 1659) for so many years was Tobago.  Defoe never saw the island but the tales of Sir Walter Raleigh and others must have made a great impression on him.

I have often thought about collecting a few coins from Trinidad and Tobago but never have.  Also would like an English and Spanish coin from about the time of Crusoe's fictional birthday.  Not sure when that was without reviewing the book but was probably in mid to late 1630's. 

I would enjoy seeing some trinidad & tobago coins images posted here if anyone has any to post.

Dale

PS the image is of my 1900 edition of the book
« Last Edit: July 15, 2009, 05:09:48 AM by dalehall »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2009, 02:18:26 PM »
Prior to the British takeover in 1797, Tobago was Spanish and using Spanish gold (the doubloon of 16 pesos) and the peso fuerte, divided in 9 bits. The money of account was the peso sincillo of 10 reales. The official rate of a peso of 8 reales was not observed. Since the price of the doubloon overvalued gold over silver, silver would have been driven out at a rate of 8 bits, so the dollar was devalued to 9 bits.

Even this didn't stop silver exports, due to an unpaid trade surplus with Britain. Pridmore mentions a cut dollar of 11 bits in 1798, made 12 bits in 1811 (KM 12) as well as the piece cut out, a moco of 1-1/2 bit (KM 9). Both pieces are rare and there are many more forgeries than originals. He also lists a number of counterstamp TB on copper Cayenne black dogs with (KM 6) or without (KM 5) annulet. These are very hard to come by. Moreover, all antedate the 1630's by a wide margin.

I think that if any money circulated on Tortoga around 1630 it would have been Spanish colonial silver in the name of Philip IV. These are not hard to find and not overly expensive. Moreover, they are badly struck and have just the right "look" for the book.

Attached is (my determination) a peso 1627-1629 Potosí (now in Bolivia).On the left is a cross with lions (Léon) and towers (Castilia) in a floral design. On the right is the Habsburg coat of arms with P•T (my interpretation) on the left and the denomination on the right.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2009, 06:08:46 PM »
Defoe's novel was inspired by a real Scotsman who had been stranded alone on a very small S. American island (not Tobago) for some months. I hadn't realised that he identified the island in his novel as Tobago.

My current scanner no longer works. I've just bought a new PC that uses Vista, so the driver is out of date and not replaceable. I've ordered a new scanner but it'll take around a week to arrive, so I can't post any images meantime.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2009, 06:12:25 PM by The Squadron of Simpletons »

Offline Prosit

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2009, 06:27:04 PM »
Defoe's novel was inspired by a real Scotsman who had been stranded alone on a very small S. American island (not Tobago) for some months. I hadn't realised that he identified the island in his novel as Tobago.

My current scanner no longer works. I've just bought a new PC that uses Vista, so the driver is out of date and not replaceable. I've ordered a new scanner but it'll take around a week to arrive, so I can't post any images meantime.

The Preface in my edition of the book identifies the island as Tobago and provides a map.  Not sure who wrote the preface...will have to look.  I have no expertise in the matter, just parroting the preface.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2009, 07:29:34 PM »
From Wikipdia:

The story was likely influenced by the real life Alexander Selkirk, a Scottish castaway who lived four years on the Pacific island called "Más a Tierra" (in 1966 its name was changed to Robinson Crusoe Island), Chile. However, the details of Crusoe's island were probably based on the Caribbean island of Tobago

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2009, 02:05:52 PM »
Here is an excerpt from the Intro of the book by Louis Rhead.

No one have any Trinidad coins to show here?   :)


Galapagos

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2009, 06:31:04 PM »
Figleaf's account of Selkirk and the island off Chile is the one I remember. But as Dale points out, Defoe himself based his fictional island on Tobago. I'll have to look up the origin of Defoe's surname now, as it COULD originate from "de Foe" - then again, it may not.

All I know of the T&T coins of the 1970s is that they were designed by a team of Franklin Mint numismatic artists. Norman Nemeth designed the bird on the 5 cents coin, but I don't know who did the other denominations.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2009, 09:14:16 PM »
His name was originally Foe, he had it leagally changed to Defoe becaue he thought it sounded more
aristocratic  :)

Dale

Galapagos

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2009, 12:52:19 PM »
No one have any Trinidad coins to show here?   :)

Is correct. They're from my new scanner. Do they look ok on your monitor? This is my 1975 proof set.

Signed,

No one.

« Last Edit: July 18, 2009, 03:17:41 PM by The Squadron of Simpletons »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2009, 06:57:26 PM »
These are of course Franklin Mint souvenir sets, designed for the US "collector item" market, not for circulation. Since the value of TTD is €0.117, I suspect Trinidad & Tobago uses banknotes only, while they'll take USD also. Nevertheless, I presume the multi-named tortoise got them for their design, not for their historic or economic significance

Peter
« Last Edit: July 18, 2009, 07:00:12 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline africancoins

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2009, 08:22:28 PM »
Actually I have a number of recent dates from Trinidad and Tobago... 1 Cent and 25 Cents dated as recently as 2007, 10 Cents 2006 and 1 Cent 2003. I only have one recent 50 Cent coin and it is of 2003. A friend went there a few years ago and hardly saw any coins.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

Galapagos

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Re: Coins of Trinidad & Tobago
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2009, 12:01:53 AM »
It's true, Figleaf -I did get them for their designs, which are very well executed. As Paul says, it seems to be mostly notes rather than coins that circulate in those islands.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 12:24:15 AM by Ice Torch »