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US Criticizes Romanian Central Bank for Issuing 'Anti Semitic' Coin

Started by Bimat, May 14, 2016, 08:17:44 AM

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Bimat

US knocks Romania for 'anti-Semitic' coin

BY AP May 13, 2016, 9:40 pm

BUCHAREST, Romania — The US Embassy in Romania on Friday criticized the country's central bank for releasing a coin bearing the image of a former bank governor who it said actively promoted anti-Semitism.

The embassy called the bank's decision to honor Mihail Manoilescu, the former governor of the National Bank of Romania, "disappointing." In a statement, it said he was "an active promoter of and contributor to fascist ideology and anti-Semitic sentiment."

Manoilescu was foreign minister in 1940, when Romania was allied with Nazi Germany. A supporter of the fascist Iron Guard, he signed a diktat under which Romania lost large swaths of territory to Hungary.

It said in a statement that the coin was part of a series minted in mid-April honoring former bank governors and noted that Manoilescu had been governor in 1931, a year of economic crisis.

It said that the coins it minted were not intended to offend any community or "send a message with an offensive, xenophobic or discriminatory nature."

It added it was examining the criticism and would establish working procedures to "avoid potential regrettable situations in the future."

Manoilescu died in a Communist prison in 1950.

Source: Times of Israel

Photo Caption: A Romanian coin bearing the likenesses of former governors of the National Bank of Romania from left) Ion I. Câmpineanu, Mihail Manoilescu and Ion I. Lapedatu. The coin is one of a series of three in gold, bronze and silver. (Romanian National Bank)


It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

chrisild

Maybe that US ambassador should have a brief look at his country's $20 bill, featuring Andrew Jackson of "Indian Removal" fame. Contrary to that paper money, those Romanian coins will certainly not circulate. Guess the mintage will be less than 1,000 again (have not looked it up), surcharged, for collectors only.

I agree, if such a collector coin honored one person only, it would in this case have been better to not issue it. But obviously it features several central bank governors. Leaving one out would be strange, I think. Remember that Belgian series of gold pieces honoring the country's kings? They merely put each of them on a coin, including Leopold II who exploited his "personal colony" in Congo in a cruel way. But again, it was a chronological series, not some coins honoring "the best" kings ...

Christian

augsburger

This is typical of the US government, to jump in on human rights without wondering about their own human rights.


constanius

Maybe their effort would be better used in gagging Trump.

As, pointed out, this is a collectors coin and as such would have very limited exposure, except now with the US making an issue about it will have greater exposure, not that I think that is a bad thing.

Honouring the governors of a bank does not imply that the lives of the each, or any, individual in that group are being honoured or condoned in anyway.


Pat

Prosit

IMO I don't see how gagging Trump could offend anyone.   >:D

Dale



Quote from: constanius on June 06, 2016, 11:24:37 PM
....Maybe their effort would be better used in gagging Trump.


Pabitra

Quote from: Prosit on June 07, 2016, 12:00:45 AM
IMO I don't see how gagging Trump could offend anyone.   >:D
Gagging Trump will be a big loss to free entertainment industry.😃

Zantetsuken

Quote from: chrisild on May 14, 2016, 12:03:25 PM
Maybe that US ambassador should have a brief look at his country's $20 bill, featuring Andrew Jackson of "Indian Removal" fame. Contrary to that paper money, those Romanian coins will certainly not circulate. Guess the mintage will be less than 1,000 again (have not looked it up), surcharged, for collectors only.

I agree, if such a collector coin honored one person only, it would in this case have been better to not issue it. But obviously it features several central bank governors. Leaving one out would be strange, I think. Remember that Belgian series of gold pieces honoring the country's kings? They merely put each of them on a coin, including Leopold II who exploited his "personal colony" in Congo in a cruel way. But again, it was a chronological series, not some coins honoring "the best" kings ...

Christian

I agree, and I'm an American saying it. Our government is a bunch of hypocrites. Say one thing. Do another. Nothing new there. However, I hear they're entertaining putting Harriette Tubman on the $20 bill in place of Jackson. How far this will go is anyones guess.

Zantetsuken

Quote from: Zantetsuken on July 04, 2016, 11:55:18 PM
I agree, and I'm an American saying it. Our government is a bunch of hypocrites. Say one thing. Do another. Nothing new there. However, I hear they're entertaining putting Harriette Tubman on the $20 bill in place of Jackson. How far this will go is anyones guess.

I doubt there would be enough fabric in the world to gag Trump's big mouth.  ;D

Figleaf

I don't worry about Trump. I worry about so many people voting for him, especially those who claim he says what everyone thinks.

Will split this off eventually as it has drifted away from the original subject...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Just when you think we're drifting, we're getting back to coins ... As mentioned in the initial post, there are three versions of that issue. 100 lei gold, 10 lei silver (image link below) and 1 leu tombac. Mintage 150 (one hundred and fifty) each. The design of the other side, by the way, shows the office of the BNR governor. (His name was Messydescu, I think. ;D )

Now what is a little strange in my opinion: Apparently the coins do not depict three consecutive central bank governors. You can find the list of them all here: http://www.bnro.ro/Guvernatorii-BNR--1060.aspx  So Câmpineanu was the first (1888), Manoilescu was BNR governor in 1931 as mentioned before, and Lapedatu in 1944/45.

Christian



Zantetsuken

Beautiful piece. I don't have too much in the way of post-communist coinage from Romania, but this is certainly inspiring me to acquire some. Thanks for sharing. Is this one yours?

chrisild

No, that is an embedded link, see here. Somewhere in that list you will find the Bank Governors issues; there is an English version too.

I do have some Romanian circulation coins, as well as most of the circulating commems (50 bani). But the collector coins with those awfully ;) low mintages I do not collect, even though many of them do have intriguing designs ...

Christian

EWC

Since my better half has Romanian roots, I ought to confess a degree of partiality here.

But getting back to the origional post -  if we look at the reverse of modern US dime with the subtlety recommended by the Leo Strauss school, does not that torch looks rather a lot like errr.....a transformed fasces?

I think we should be told!

Just joking fellers   :)

Figleaf

Symbols are important. A torch is a symbol of light and leadership, it was not used by the nazis (those in the Nuremberg rallies were tools, not symbols.) A fasces is a symbol for strength through co-operation. The tale of an arrow that can be broken individually, but not in a bunch exists in Roman as well as Japanese mythology.

The governor is a symbol also. To the Romanians he is a symbol of the bank, to the Americans he is a symbol of deadly discrimination, which is something that, understandably, does not sit well with them. Since symbols are a creation of the mind, both parties can be right at the same time.

If Americans use symbols that can be interpreted in several ways, like Jackson, that does not mean they have no right to object to others doing the same. Two negatives usually pile up, rather than cancel each other out, except in mathematics, which is quite separate from reality anyway.

Quote from: chrisild on May 14, 2016, 12:03:25 PM
those Romanian coins will certainly not circulate. Guess the mintage will be less than 1,000 again (have not looked it up), surcharged, for collectors only.

I think this is a strong argument. This is an insignificant medal with a denomination that will soon be forgotten. Nobody is forced to buy it. The counter-argument is that one hopes the episode will have forced the Romanian authorities to give it a think. That would be good. Few things are more frustrating than someone pointing out symbols of deadly discrimination and the other party just shrugging. Even Trump knows that now.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.