Author Topic: Anything bigger than this?  (Read 10264 times)

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Offline mrbadexample

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Anything bigger than this?
« on: March 08, 2016, 06:30:54 PM »
Hi All,

A new arrival came in the post this morning. I don't normally buy slabbed coins, because I think it takes something away - you lose the tactility of the coin in hand. (It also makes them difficult to photograph!) But for years I've wanted a good one. I've already got a bad one.  ;D

This has to be my favourite coin, the "cartwheel" two pence from the UK, 1797.  Over 5mm thick, 41mm in diameter and a massive 56.7g of copper. They minted 722,160 of them.

I'd like to know if any world coin, issued for general circulation, can beat this for size?

Or can you tell me the largest circulation coin from your country of choice?

Have fun,
MBE  8)

(Edited for the pre-slab pictures.)
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 11:51:53 PM by mrbadexample »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2016, 06:58:47 PM »
Not counting recent 1 kilo and worse "coin" issues that have no possible claim to being money, my candidates, early Russian coppers, are a mere 51 grams. However, there are more types to collect: Cr 9, 59 both with several sub-types and an overstrike, Cr 44.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 07:10:37 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2016, 07:09:46 PM »
However, the champion of big copper is Sweden. Its plate money easily beats everything. My picture shows a particularly heavy piece (19.7 kilograms) from the collection of the royal coin cabinet in Stockholm. Such somewhat exaggerated pieces served mainly as opportunistic ballast on ships, but the lighter plate coins were in use.

Both Sweden and Russia (in particular Siberia) were dominant European copper producers.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 08:55:16 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2016, 08:43:40 PM »
However, the champion of big copper is Sweden. Its plate money easily beats everything. My picture shows a particularly heavy piece (19.7 kilograms) from the collecting of the royal coin cabinet in Stockholm. Such somewhat exaggerated pieces served mainly as opportunistic ballast on ships, but the lighter plate coins were in use.

Both Sweden and Russia (in particular Siberia) were dominant European copper producers.

Peter

That's a coin?  :o

Ok, you win.  :D

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 08:44:56 PM »
What do the Cr numbers refer to Peter? I'd like to take a look at the Russian coppers.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2016, 09:43:38 PM »
Cr stands for Craig. The catalogues of Yeoman and Craig were in the 1960s what KM is today. When KM started out, it used Y and Cr numbers. Almost all country chapters were re-numbered, but the Russia chapter still uses Y and Cr numbers plus (for the older coins) KM numbers. On top of that chaos, Y and Cr numbers overlap, so you can't use the original catalogues and expect that collectors using KM will understand *sigh*

Attached is one of those Russian heavyweights, in the name of Ekaterina II, as impressive as her coins, not only by deeds (she's known as Catherine the great), but also by her weight (she famously died by collapsing her toilet). Ekaterinenburg mint (EM), dated 1763.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2016, 09:52:44 PM »
I think I'd like me one of them. :)

Offline bruce61813

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2016, 09:57:37 PM »
If you go to ancients, look at http://ptolemybronze.com/ptolemy_series.html , the  Ptolemy II
Sidon Double Cornucopia - Series 3, 42mm - 68.4gm
Sv758 - Double Cornucopia on eagle shoulder. I have one of these , the single eagle type though, looks like a bronze hocky puck.

Bruce
« Last Edit: March 10, 2016, 02:38:01 AM by Quant.Geek »

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2016, 11:49:06 PM »
If you go to ancients, look at http://ptolemybronze.com/ptolemy_series.html, the  Ptolemy II
Sidon Double Cornucopia - Series 3, 42mm - 68.4gm
Sv758 - Double Cornucopia on eagle shoulder. I have one of these , the single eagle type though, looks like a bronze hocky puck.

Bruce

Thanks Bruce, that is a whopper! Are they difficult to acquire?
« Last Edit: March 10, 2016, 02:40:06 AM by Quant.Geek »

Online Figleaf

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2016, 11:58:39 PM »
Are these cast, Bruce? It would take an angry elephant to strike them with a hammer...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Afrasi

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2016, 01:41:32 AM »
Making the flans would be even more difficult. If I remember correct, the flans were cast, but the coin struck.

Online malj1

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2016, 03:15:06 AM »
Even larger are the tokens produced for the Birmingham workhouse, a extremely rare copper sixpence, of which only six were made, along with this threepence at 44.7mm with 72.3g of copper.

I think that is about 2.5+ ounces.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2016, 12:56:25 AM »
Certainly the biggest token I've ever seen.  :o

Online malj1

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2016, 01:29:52 AM »
If you go to ancients, look at http://ptolemybronze.com/ptolemy_series.html, the  Ptolemy II
Sidon Double Cornucopia - Series 3, 42mm - 68.4gm
Sv758 - Double Cornucopia on eagle shoulder. I have one of these , the single eagle type though, looks like a bronze hocky puck.

Bruce

I wasn't allowed to visit that link.  ::)
« Last Edit: March 10, 2016, 02:39:10 AM by Quant.Geek »
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Quant.Geek

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Re: Anything bigger than this?
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2016, 02:38:34 AM »
Fixed the link  ;D
A gallery of my coins can been seen at FORVM Ancient Coins