Dhows and other sailing boats

Started by Galapagos, May 10, 2009, 12:20:15 PM

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Galapagos

Pakistan Pice Paisa.jpg  Pakistan 5 paisa.jpg


There are quite a few ships on both circulation and NCLT coins.

Here is an attractive sailing boat design on a Pakistan coin of the early 1960s.


Note the legend change from "FIVE PICE" to "5 PAISA".

The figure five is shown in Arabic form on the sail - a nice touch.


There is also a later variation of the coin from 1971.

This time it has a European figure five on the sail.


There is no longer any European lettering on the design.

Can anybody read what is written in the native language?


Notice also how the European Christian-era date has been replaced by a star.

The date is now given on the obverse as "1971", in European figures.

Harald

All inscriptions say the same, just the denomination: "pānč paisã" in Urdu, "pāṁc paýasā" in Bengali. The latter was dropped after 1972 for obvious reasons. The switch-over from "pice" to "paisa" was a sort of de-colonialisation of languages.

cheers
--
Harald
http://www.liganda.ch (monetary history & numismatic linguistics)

Galapagos

#2
Muscat and Oman 5 baiza 1962.jpg

Muscat and Oman, 5 baiza, 1962.


This is another one-off ship/boat design.

It's a 5 baisa from Muscat and Oman, issued in 1961, and depicts an Arab dhow.


Presumably "baisa" is the same word as "paisa" or "pice" on the Pakistani coins.

Arabic doesn't normally use the letter 'p', but Urdu does. 

This probably explains the use of the b for this denomination.


The coin was produced by the Royal Mint and appears in its documents of the time.

Unfortunately it doesn't tell who designed this attractive little coin.

Bimat

Quote from: translateltd on May 10, 2009, 08:54:10 PM
Arabic doesn't normally use the letter 'p', but Urdu does.  This probably explains the use of the b for this denomination.


Oman has coins denominated in Baisa.So,it is possible that both Baisa and Paisa have same meaning.
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

andyg

#4
Lebanon.jpg

Here's a modern one from Lebanon.

QuoteNot a yacht in any meaning of the word, but a lateen rigged sloop.

Originally, a yacht was a light, fast two-master, tasked with distributing messages from the admiral to the captains of the ships in a commercial or military fleet. Being fast, it could catch up with the larger ships, hence the name, which comes from the Dutch "jacht" (hunting). Today, it is mostly applied to motorized pleasure craft in Dutch (cabin cruiser in English), while it is used indiscriminately to all kinds of (mostly expensive) sailing boats in English.

Originally a sloop was a workboat on board a larger ship. It was used to get crew to shore ferry supplies to the ship, as a lifeboat or to catch fish (from setting out nets to harpooning whales), while based on a mother ship. They sometimes, but not very often, carried mast and sail. Today, in English, a sloop is a simple, one-masted boat with two sails, a head sail and a main sail. The main sail is often "square", but the sloop on the coin has a latin (triangular) sail aft. In Dutch, a sloep is still a rowing boat.

Peter

always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

<k>

#5
Djibouti 10fr 1999.jpg

A ship and a boat together. An exotic Arab design from Djibouti: 10 francs, 1999.
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<k>

#6
French Somalia 1952 20fr.jpg

French Somalia, 20 francs, 1952. 
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<k>

#7


Maldives, 25 rufiyaa, 1978.
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Figleaf

Indeed, a boat, rather than a ship, probably a sailing canoe. Even in the Maldives, I expect that such craft are now motorized. The size of the octopus relative to the boat can still be explained away with "perspective", but the size of the fish swinging in the air relative to the boat is funny. I suppose the whole picture is meant metaphorically ::)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

#9
Qatar, 50 dirhams, 1998.jpg

Qatar, 50 dirhams, 1998.  Dhow.
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<k>

#10


Bahrain, 250 fils, 1969.

Fishing dow at anchor. The same type of boat under sail is here.
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<k>

#11
Senegal 50fr 1975.jpg

Senegal, 50 francs.


Sailing canoe, probably a fisherman. Very pretty rigging.

Similar sails are used in Sri Lanka and the Philippines where they typically use outriggers.
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<k>

#12
Maldives 250R 1996.jpg

Maldives, 250 rufiyaa, 1996.
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<k>

#13
Oman 1 rial 1996 Al Badan.JPG

Oman, 1 rial, 1996. Badan dhow.
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<k>

#14
Oman 50 riyals 1971.jpg

Oman, 50 riyals (gold), 1971.  Dhow.
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