Author Topic: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967  (Read 4167 times)

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Offline Arthas1011

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USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« on: September 13, 2015, 02:02:09 PM »
Hi there.  I was wondering if anyone had an example of a USSR coin I once had.  It was a Kopek coin and it had a vostok rocket on one side.  Im not sure it was a commemorative coin as it was of a general circulation quality.

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2015, 05:49:16 PM »
USSA, 10 kopek, 1967, "Fifty years of Soviet rule."
Metal: Copper-Nickel.
Diameter - 17,27mm.
The thickness of the edge - 1.3 mm.
Weight - 2.05 g
Circulation: 50 million., Including 211.25 thousand improved quality (uncirculated).

Painter - Y.A. Lukyanov.
Author sculpting - I.S. Komshilov.
Minting made at the Leningrad Mint. The reverse side shows the monument "Conquerors of Space", built in Moscow in 1964.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2015, 07:24:18 PM by Gusev »
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2015, 05:59:11 PM »
 :)
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2015, 06:14:45 PM »
USSA, 1 rubl, 1977, "Sixty years of Soviet rule."
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Arthas1011

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2015, 12:23:55 AM »
Many thanks

Offline canadacoin

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2015, 04:17:08 AM »
Same monument also appears on the 1980 Olympic ruble coin
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 02:52:36 PM by <k> »

Offline bgriff99

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2015, 08:51:29 AM »
My eyes are attracted to the ship on the ruble coin.    The Aurora?

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2015, 09:56:09 AM »
My eyes are attracted to the ship on the ruble coin.    The Aurora?
Yes.
Aurora  is a 1900 Russian protected cruiser, currently preserved as a museum ship in St. Petersburg. Aurora was one of three Pallada-class cruisers, built in St. Petersburg for service in the Pacific. All three ships of this class served during the Russo-Japanese War. Aurora survived the Battle of Tsushima and was interned under US protection in the Philippines, eventually returned to the Baltic Fleet. The second ship, Pallada, was sunk by the Japanese at Port Arthur in 1904. The third ship, Diana, was interned in Saigon after the Battle of the Yellow Sea. One of the first incidents of the October Revolution in Russia took place on the cruiser Aurora. (From Wikipedia)
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline canadacoin

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2015, 01:04:34 PM »
Aurora is also shown on the 1967 20 kopeeks
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 02:51:26 PM by <k> »

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2015, 02:21:54 PM »
Once shot the cannon and on 70 years Russia was plunged into gloom.

 8)  :'(
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2015, 03:42:56 AM »
It's sort of a shame they locked onto that ship as a political icon.   I mean, for 1917?  It was a relic, with no glorious fighting history.     But who remembers the Slava?

Offline Figleaf

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2015, 08:26:53 AM »
Aurora is not pictured on the coins for its fighting history, but for its value as a symbol of communism.

Wiki says: part of her crew joined the 1917 February Revolution. A revolutionary committee was created on the ship, with Aleksandr Belyshev elected as captain. Most of the crew joined the Bolsheviks, who were preparing for a Communist revolution.

At 9.45 p.m on 25 October 1917 (O.S.) a blank shot from her forecastle gun signaled the start of the assault on the Winter Palace, which was to be the beginning of the October Revolution.


Note the search light pointing forward on both coins, which is a standard part of Soviet iconography.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2015, 01:30:55 PM »
Thank you Peter for complete information. Probably, for many this story is not known
We studied it in school as the beginning of the history of the USSR. :)
When I joined the All-Union Leninist Young Communist League (Komsomol) in 1967, I received the following question:
How many people were killed during the storming of the Winter Palace?
Of course, I knew the answer.
Who on this forum knows the right answer? ???
I give three answers (one of them is correct)
1. Nobody.
2. Several hundred.
3. Several thousand.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Arthas1011

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2015, 03:31:46 PM »
I would think B.  I know initially the royal family were spared until they more or less became expendable.

Offline Gusev

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Re: USSR: commemorative 10 kopek, 1967
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2015, 05:27:47 PM »
I would think B.  I know initially the royal family were spared until they more or less became expendable.
No, it is not correct.
Nicholas 2 in the Winter Palace at this time there was no. It was the residence of the Provisional Government.
Nicholas II abdicated following the February Revolution of 1917 during which he and his family were imprisoned first in the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo, then later in the Governor's Mansion in Tobolskи  (Siberia), and finally at the Ipatiev House in Yekaterinburg. In the spring of 1918, Nicholas was handed over to the local Ural soviet by commissar Vasili Yakovlev who was given a written receipt.[8] Nicholas II; his wife, Alexandra Feodorovna; his son, Alexei Nikolaevich; his four daughters, Olga Nikolaevna, Tatiana Nikolaevna, Maria Nikolaevna and Anastasia Nikolaevna; the family's medical doctor, Evgeny Botkin; the Emperor's footman, Alexei Trupp; the Empress' maidservant, Anna Demidova; and the family's cook, Ivan Kharitonov, were executed in the same room by the Bolsheviks on the night of 16/17 July 1918.

Interesting fact. Nikolai 2 attended 11.05.1900 when launched the cruiser Aurora.
A shot of the cruiser Aurora has buried the Romanov empire and gave birth to an empire of Communists and KGB.

"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.