Author Topic: Some more scarcer Jitals  (Read 3233 times)

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Offline bububoy

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Re: Some more scarcer Jitals
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2015, 10:34:21 AM »
I liked the geometric design on the first coin, nice!
mahe

Offline THCoins

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Re: Some more scarcer Jitals
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2015, 10:40:53 AM »
Thanks for your reply and appreciation ! I like the design also, also because it is a bit of an exeption within the range. Still have to get the Ghaznavid type with the same design.

Offline THCoins

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Re: Some more scarcer Jitals
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2015, 07:41:20 PM »
I alreay piled a lot of scarcer Jitals in this thread. here is another one issued under the authority of Ala-ud-din Muhammad Khwarezmshah.
This coin was struck is Kurzuwan. The mintname in Arab is divided over the centre of the obverse and reverse.
AE 21 mm, 2.11 gr, Tye#270.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Some more scarcer Jitals
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2015, 12:02:31 AM »
Isn't this an Arab style coin, a fals? Maybe I don't quite understand what a jital is. I thought that would be Indian style, thick, billon. I like this design btw.
-- Paul

Offline THCoins

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Re: Some more scarcer Jitals
« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2015, 07:50:26 PM »
Yes, you are right, this type certainly has Arab influences. But that doesn't immediately make it a Fals.
We do not know how the contemporary users called these coins. Generally the term Jital is used for the billon and copper coinage for every day use in the area now comprizing Afghanistan, Pakistan and northern India, derived from the bull and horseman coinage of the Shahi of Kabul.
Under Ala-ud-din Muhammad a very large amount of these cointypes were issued which partly appear related and partly show a divergence in design and fabric over time and place. This also includes taking elements of other coinage, like the flat medium fals size. In nomenclature it is just a choice how one whishes to classify there different types. To emphazise their interrelation i generally use the term Jitals. A more pragmatic approach is that all of these are included in the "Jitals" catalogue of Robert Tye. Only for those which probably were used in a different manner it may be prefered to use alternative terms, like the fiduciary bronze dirhems.

I also like the design a lot. Also because, regardless of Arabic elements, it is immediately recognizable as a typical Khwarezmshah bronze coin.