Author Topic: China, Ming Rebel Prince of Fu 1644  (Read 1071 times)

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Offline bgriff99

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China, Ming Rebel Prince of Fu 1644
« on: January 28, 2015, 06:16:41 AM »
Hung Kuang t'ung-pao, reverse 'feng' for Feng-yang, Anhui Province.     Prince Fu was a grandson of the Wan-li emperor, set up as new emperor of what was left of the Ming at Nanking in 1644.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: China, Ming Rebel Prince of Fu 1644
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2015, 10:29:31 PM »
What a great coin to find! He ruled for less than a year.

I am somewhat surprised by the sloppiness of the characters. His reign name 弘光 is almost hard to recognise and does not contain any triangles. Difficult circumstances, I suppose...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: China, Ming Rebel Prince of Fu 1644
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2015, 11:40:23 PM »
Peter, there are numerous varieties with more conventional writing.   Virtually mint state pieces can be had right now on eBay for $9 or so.   That is always tempting, since I have only one other piece, well worn.    This one I posted because it is somewhat rare and not often seen.   

This prince gets some fictionalized treatment in Jonathan Spence's 'Return to Dragon Mountain', which depicts the fall of the Ming from the perspective of a wealthy and privileged Chinese man.    He portrays the Prince of Fu as feckless, incompetent but utterly self-indulgent.    Not worth anyone's allegiance.
The arc of the story is essentially the self-realization of the narrator that he himself has been nothing but self-absorbed, and that the country itself collapsed because that was regarded as the desirable way to live.     When he meets the prince, he is at first awed by his high office and the severe circumstances he must deal with.   But then quickly realizes he is not capable or even interested in doing so.   Just maintaining his privileges and cushy life.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: China, Ming Rebel Prince of Fu 1644
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2015, 12:41:06 AM »
If self-indulgence were a crime, we wouldn't have enough prisons. I get your point, but it is beyond me that such a person didn't realise that his self indulgence could only be maintained by beating the Qing.

There was so much wrong with the Mings and it is so wonderfully summed up by "they lost the mandate of heaven". Maybe that is the key to the prince of Fu's behaviour. If you believe that heaven is against you, your best option is to enjoy life to the fullest, before someone takes your head off and you die of your wounds.

Meanwhile, I am agape at the price you quote. Has a large quantity been found?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bgriff99

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Re: China, Ming Rebel Prince of Fu 1644
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2015, 01:28:59 AM »


Meanwhile, I am agape at the price you quote. Has a large quantity been found?

Peter

The common varieties were never scarce.   Nowadays many cash coins are lower than in the 1970's simply because so many are being excavated in China, and the distribution opened up.   In Zhongguo Guqian Daji the price given for all the common varieties is 15 yuan, or about $2.50.   

Vietnam is really amazing for having Le Dynasty pieces so plentiful now, selling at 10% or 20% what they did 35 years ago, and in much better condition.   It is a good time to acquire them.   Just as it was a good time to obtain Sinkiang coins when they came flooding out in the 1980's, and Chinese cash from Indonesia in the 1970-80's.