Author Topic: Ghaznavid, Masud III, Lahore, 1099-1115 AD, Tye 105.  (Read 1054 times)

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Offline asm

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Ghaznavid, Masud III, Lahore, 1099-1115 AD, Tye 105.
« on: December 30, 2014, 05:07:04 PM »
Wt: aprox 3.5 g. Please help attribute.

Amit
« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 04:27:17 PM by THCoins »
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Offline THCoins

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Re: Bull type. Please help attribute.
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2014, 05:22:02 PM »
Interesting ! I believe this is supposed to be a Ghaznavid type issued bye Masud III, Lahore, 1099-115 AD, Tye 105.
However, the spelling above the bull is a bit weird variation. It is supposed to read "Sri Samanta Deva. The "Nta" part has degenerated quite a bit. If i were to read it like it is written i would read "Sri SaBhiH DeVa" or "Sri ShaHi Deva"
« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 05:00:15 PM by THCoins »

Offline THCoins

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Re: Ghaznavid, Masud III, Lahore, 1099-1115 AD, Tye 105.
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2015, 03:58:34 PM »
When i first replied to this thread i just considered the text above the bull an interesting example of a degenerate text due to repeated copying. The "Samanta Deva" that should be there, just mingled up.
Over the past months however i have seen more examples of very nicely engraved coins with the same strange text elements.
Delving into the references, mr Tye distinguishes between 8 subtypes of type Tye#105. The general text is given as "Sri Samanta Deva". Looking at the line drawings however, type Tye#105.1, 3 and 4 al share the malformed character, but the top of this is missing, so it is difficult to give a certain reading from this.
Here below is another example of a expertly engraved coin, with almost fully visible legend above the bull. It is very similar, but not die identical, to the one above. I can only draw one conclusion from this; This does not read "Samanta Deva" and i think it is unlikely this was intended to read as such.

The leftmost character is a clear "Sri". After this comes a "Sa". The bottom left pointing flag on this makes this "Su". (Compare with how the "Su"is written on the coins of Kashmir ruler Sussala Deva.) There is definitely no "Ma" after the "Sa".
The second character, as stated before, looks like a "Bha" or "Ha". However, the right loop also resembles that of "Nta"on the samanta deva types. So it could also be a compound character ending with "Ta". The left part of the character would very well fit "La" (The retroflex type, like used in Brahmi on the coin legend of Satavahana ruler Sri Pulomavi. This "Ḷ" type seems not to be used in modern Devanagari any more.).
After this character there are three lines in a row. A punctuation mark or visarga seems unlikely. The only Sharada candidate character for this is "Na" (retroflex type, Ṇa). This is followed by "DeVa".

In summary, i suggest that the accepted reading of the legend on these coins of "Samanta Deva" is not correct for specific subtypes. It seems more likely that it is intended to read something different. The most likely, and sensible, hypothesis i think is a reading of "Sri SuLtaNa Deva". On later Delhi types "SuRiTaNa" is used for the transcription of "Sultan". But that does not preclude the Ghaznavids from using another form.

Anthony
« Last Edit: July 31, 2019, 02:39:13 PM by THCoins »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Ghaznavid, Masud III, Lahore, 1099-1115 AD, Tye 105.
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2015, 05:27:38 PM »
It seems more likely that it is intended to read "Sri Shahi Deva". Whether this change in text was due to repeated transcription errors, or on purpose, is something that can probably not be answered.

Isn't there the option of these coins belonging to another ruler? There are 21 occurrences of the word shah in the Wikipedia lemma on the Ghaznavids.

Peter
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Offline THCoins

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Re: Ghaznavid, Masud III, Lahore, 1099-1115 AD, Tye 105.
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2015, 05:46:59 PM »
That's a possibility that is luckily ruled out by the arab text on the other side of the coin. The last two lines state the name of the ruler: Abu Sa'd / Mas'ud.