Sunth Paisa

Started by Rangnath, March 04, 2009, 04:40:55 AM

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Rangnath

A little over 1000 sq km., the princely state of Sunth is SMALL.  I think that Aidan will be interested in this coin, but I know little about the state.
My guess, is that this coin is KM #4.  It weighs 5.1 grams, bit heavier than the range listed in the standard catalog; 1.9 to 4.3 grams.  And the shape is odd, not rectangular or square as would be indicated in the catalog.  But it does have two spears on both sides. 
There is no date and the attribution is uncertain.  The standard catalog dates the coin as 1870 to 1920.
Anyone have more information?
richie

Rangnath

Yes, that is exactly the way I felt. I was very happy to find this coin!
If I find a second one, I'll let  you know!
richie

Figleaf

#2
Sunth. — State in the Political Agency of Rewa Kantha, Bombay, lying between 22° 55' and 23 33' N. and 73 45' and 74 10' E., with an area of 394 square miles. It is bounded on the north by the Kadana State of Rewa Kantha and the States of Dungarpur and Banswara of Rajputana ; on the east by the Thalod tdluka of the British District of the Panch Mahals ; on the south by Sanjeli State under Rewa. Kantha and by the Godhra tdluka of the Panch Mahals ; and on the west by Lunavada State.

To the north the country is fairly flat and open, crossed by several small streams on their way north to the Mahl ; to the south it is rugged, covered with long craggy lines of hill. The Mahl flows through the north-west, and the Panam through the south-west corner of the State. Near the centre the small stream of Chibota passes by the village of Sunth, and towards the east the Suki flows past the village of Rampur. A range of hills, of no great height, running in a curve from the Panam river in the south to the Mahl in the north, divides the State into two parts. Besides this principal range, many other hills run in parallel lines from north to south. The climate is generally unhealthy and malarious.

The family of the chief of Sunth, Poriwar or Paramara by caste, claims to belong to the Mahipawat branch of the famous Malwa dynasty. The dynasty was driven from Ujjain (it is stated in the tenth century a.d.) ; and, according to the Sunth bards, Jhalam Singh, a Ponwar from Mount Abu, established his power at Jhalod in the Panch Mahals, and gave his name to the town.

There is a legend that the emperor, hearing of the exceeding beauty of the daughter of Jhalam Singh, Rana of Jhalod (the fifth in succession from Jhalam Singh, the founder of the dynasty at Jhalod), demanded her in marriage ; and that on Jhalam Singh declining the alliance, he was attacked by the Mughal army, defeated, and killed. His son, Rana Sunth, fled for safety to the Sunth jungles, then under the sway of a Bhll chief called Sutta. In the year 1255 Sunth defeated Sutta, and took possession of his capital, called Brahmapuri. He changed its name to Sunth, and established his own dynasty. According to another tradition, the Sunth family is said to have come from Dhar in Malwa, when that principality was conquered by the Muhammadans.

From 1443 the State was tributary to the Ahmadabad Sultans, and, on their decline, received some additions of territory. In 1819 Sunth was overrun by Sindhia's troops, and would have been either annexed or laid waste had not the British Government interfered. Through the medium of Sir John Malcolm it was arranged that, on condition of Sindhia withdrawing his troops, Sunth should pay a tribute of Rs. 6,100. The control of the State, vested in the British Government under this arrangement, was in 1826 made over to the Rewa Kantha Political Agent. The chief is entitled to a salute of 9 guns. The family follows the rule of primogeniture for succession, and holds a sanad authorizing adoption.

The population was: (1881) 52,822, (1891) 74,275, and (1901) 39,956, showing a decrease of 46 per cent, during the last decade, due to the famine of 1899- 1900. The State contains one town, Rampur (population, 3,338); and 87 villages. Hindus number 38,211 and Muhammadans 1,552. The capital is Rampur, situated on the range of hills that crosses the State from north to south.

The only arable land is in the valleys, where the soil, well charged with moisture, yields without manure two crops a year of ordinary grain. Maize is the staple ; and millet, pulse, gram, wheat, and in a few well-favoured spots sugar-cane, are also grown. The forests yield a large supply of timber. Irrigation is carried on from tanks and wells. In 1903-4 the value of exports from the State was 2 lakhs and of imports Rs. 90,000.

The chief has power to try his own subjects for capital offences without the permission of the Political Agent. He enjoys a revenue of about \\ lakhs, and pays a tribute of Rs. 5,384-9-To to the British Government. The State contains one municipality, Rampur, with an income in 1903-4 of Rs. 228. There is no organized military force, but a body of 13 Arabs act as guards of the palace, 5 men of the foot police act as gunners in addition to their ordinary duties, and 39 pattawats hold villages on feudal tenure. In 1903-4 the police numbered 155. The State contains one jail, and a dispensary, treating annually about 6,000 patients. There were, in 1903-4, n schools with 494 pupils, of whom 60 were girls.

Source: The Imperial Gazetteer of India, Vol XXIII

Kipling would have been able to describe lovingly the dry British civil servant put to work on the catalogue of feudal states for the Imperial Gazetteer of India, knowing fully well that few would read it and no one would care. I am no Kipling. All I can do is smile.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

Thanks Peter.
You've included enough information for a mini-series: love, war, famine, disease.. stark hills and a river runs through it. 
Thanks,
richie

Rangnath

#4
 
Oesho has this to add to our discussion of coins from Sunth:

The coins of Sunth were for the first time more correctly described by Ken W. Wiggins and M. Culver in the Information Sheet no.28 of the Oriental Numismatic Society: The coinage of some Rewa Kantha States, Gujarat, India. Earlier Valentine thought they were from Banswara, whilst in earlier editions of KM they included them under the heading of Rampur.
The publication in the Information Sheet 28 aroused some interest and in the ONS-Newsletter 155 (Winter 1998) an addendum was published.

The coins were known as Rampurias, the capital of the state was Rampur and the coins themselves bear the inscription Sri Rampur on one side; the word following each and line upon line.
On the obverse a variety of symbols is shown, particular a kind of "solar symbols" or "sunbursts". They probably are neither, but it is suggested that they are representations of the agni-kunda. This was the altar of the ancient Rajput Pramara clan on which was kindled the agni or sacred flame. As the Maharana of Sunth was of the Pramara clan it is possible that it was thought appropriate to put this symbol on the coins.
Many coins found struck on coins of Lunavada and on coins of Baroda. Below a selection of Sunth coins for the readers perusal, however many more varieties, overstrikes, denominations, etc. exist.
Sunth paisa 1 (KM#3)
Sunth paisa 2 (KM#6.2)
Sunth paisa 3, over struck on a coin of Dalal Sinhji of Lunavada
Sunth paisa 4, over struck on a coin of Baroda (AH128x, therefore struck after 1865)
Sunth paisa 5, over struck on an earlier issue of Sunth
Sunth paisa 6, fly wisk
Sunth paisa 7, four katars arranged in a circle
Sunth paisa 8, four hands arranged cross-wise

Rangnath

I think that the second series is better for viewing.  Please let me know privately or here which is preferable


What an incredible resouce. Where else would it be possible to see such a series of Sunth coins?  Thanks Oesho.
richie


asm

Oesho and Richie,
Thanks for the incredible pictures. I have been under the impression that Rampur and Sunth are two separate states. I have a few coins of Rampur which I have currently classified as such, while I also have a coin of Sunth (as the first illustrated above). Later this week I will see if I am able to reclassify the same inlight of the discussions above. In case I have any difficulties, I will come to you with a request for help.
Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Figleaf

#7
The second series does better on my screen also. It would be good to keep the descriptions with the illustrations. Once more, I am agape at a series that I had never seen a single coin of, let alone this magnificent series. Yet another world class thread here ...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Rangnath

I agree with you Peter. The series is incredible; a true feast for the senses.
I removed the higher resolution images.  I'll reserve them for moments when close-ups are necessary.
richie

Overlord

Here is one I found (Paisa, KM#9):

Mass=8.1 g

Obverse


Reverse

MORGENSTERNN

Here some more Sunth paisa KM#6.1&2 and one half paisa that I don't know how attribute because it's similar to Rampura KM#7 and Lunavada KM#B12

MORGENSTERNN

Here other half paisa from Lunavada or Sunth
please help to attribute correctly

MORGENSTERNN

And finaly 2 paisa from Rampura

asm

Quote from: MORGENSTERNN on July 16, 2015, 08:57:03 PM
Here some more Sunth paisa KM#6.1&2 and one half paisa that I don't know how attribute because it's similar to Rampura KM#7 and Lunavada KM#B12

All the coins you post are not Sunth [Rampur is a creation of KM - the state of RAMPUR was in UP (Uttar Pradesh)] thousand odd kilometers from the Rewa Kantha State of SUNTH whose capital was Rampur and the mint was situated at Rampur.

I would love it if the coins you have posted are split into individual posts to be able to attribute them to the correct state / please PM me smaller images so that I will split the SUNT and LUNAVADA coins for you.

Amit

PS: I (along with a friend) am currently working on a catalogue for the 4 Rewa Kantha States and may be the final work may be ready by the end of the year.
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

MORGENSTERNN

Thank you for your answer Amit

I also suspected Sunth and "Rampura/Rampur" beeing the same state but Zeno split them so I did it also...

Is there a difference between Sunth - Sunt - Sant states or are they denomination of the same place and in this case which is better ?

I already found the difference with Rampur (mint of Sunth) and Rampura state in north of India so if I well understand the state of "Rampura" mentioned in Krause is a mistake and should be join to the Sunth issues.

I post the first coin to attribute on the Topic
I will see later if I manage to send others with PM
Weight of this coin is 4.20 grams size is 14 mm and my first impression was Lunavada ruler Wakhat Singhji
Do you think that coin could be a copy? (the same sender sold me fakes 1/4 rupees from Jodhpur)