Author Topic: Best computer-aided designs  (Read 1663 times)

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Offline <k>

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Best computer-aided designs
« on: November 13, 2014, 06:59:31 PM »
Sometimes you look at a design and you just know it has been created on a computer. Show your favourite examples here.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2014, 07:00:02 PM »
Alderney, 1000 Pounds, 2004. 60th Anniversary of D-Day.  Designer: Matt Bonaccorsi.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2019, 08:46:28 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2014, 07:00:54 PM »


Cook Islands, $200, 2003.  275th anniversary of the birth of Captain Cook.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2014, 11:13:19 PM »
UK 20 pence, introduced 2008.

Though I do not like the old-fashioned heraldic theme of the current UK coin series, I do like the execution of the designs. The textured look on parts of the coin would not have been possible without computer-aided design.
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Offline augsburger

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2014, 08:49:40 AM »
What do we mean here? That the initial design was done on computer or that the final product has been done on computer?

The reality is, Dent's British designs were designed first on paper. I've seen the initial drawings somewhere on the internet. However, they were put into the computer.

I think most designers do things on the computer now, it makes life so much easier. You can draw onto the computer now, use one drawing you like and keep it, while changing other stuff, saves a lot of time and effort.

However I saw this coin for the first time last weekend, and I was surprised that it actually looks like that. I had thought it was just like that on the computer because people had only the design of the coin, and not actual pictures.


« Last Edit: November 15, 2014, 01:00:40 PM by eurocoin »

Offline <k>

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2014, 02:04:47 PM »
What do we mean here? That the initial design was done on computer or that the final product has been done on computer?

Really, I mean that there are aspects of the design that are computer-enhanced, and which you would not have seen in traditional methods of engraving.
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Offline augsburger

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2014, 02:24:22 PM »
I'd suggest that very few now are non-computer designed at some point in the process. My olympic 50p wasn't as far as I know, and some were drawn. Though I'd say anything coming out of the modern mints are all computer processed.

Offline <k>

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2014, 06:45:26 PM »
Quote
I'd suggest that very few now are non-computer designed at some point in the process.

I agree. What I mean is designs that LOOK distinctly as though they have been designed and/or sculpted and/or engraved on a computer and are unlikely to have been done by non-computerised methods.

According to Matt Bonaccorsi, who was an engraver and designer at the Royal Mint, he started there in 1996 and the computes came in a few weeks later. That suggests that this coin, the 1995 1 tambala of Malawi, was designed without the aid of a computer, but to my eyes the fish scales look too precise to be a computer-free product.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2014, 07:24:47 PM »
Augsburger has a point that coins aren't produced without 'puter beasties any more, but it looks like you're after something else: patterns on coins looking too neat to be natural.

I'd add another class: effects that cannot be hand-made, such as a hologram (don't we already have a thread on those somewhere?) Here's my contribution: the map of 2009 Manhattan was made by Google maps and cut so precise, that, with the help of a microscope, I could locate the Millenium Hilton hotel I once stayed in. A gimmick, but it couldn't have been done by hand.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Best computer-aided designs
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2014, 10:50:53 PM »